CollectionsExaminer
IN THE NEWS

Examiner

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
May 11, 1996 | by Frank Dougherty, Daily News Staff Writer
The independent examiner who chaired SEPTA's 1997 capital budget hearings said he has no choice but to recommend that the SEPTA board adopt a budget he fears is "flirting with disaster. " It's a $268 million plan that will force SEPTA commuters to make do - or do without well into the 21st century, warned examiner Robert B. Johnston. It "will substantially reduce replacement and/or expansion of SEPTA facilities, thereby reducing SEPTA's ability to serve the region," Johnston said.
NEWS
August 14, 1991 | By John P. Martin, Special to The Inquirer
Lee Franczyk expected to have a license to drive when he walked out of the state troopers' barracks in Trevose last month. But the only ride he got was out the door - allegedly on the foot of an irate license examiner who was unable to put on the brakes during a verbal dispute. Yesterday, state police filed assault charges against John J. Simons, an examiner for eight years, in the July 20 attack on Franczyk, 20, of Hellerman Street in Philadelphia. "He literally kicked the kid out," said David Zellis, senior deputy district attorney in Bucks County.
NEWS
October 7, 2010
Ilio Alessandrini, 87, of Buena Vista, former chief postal systems and finance examiner of Southeastern Pennsylvania, died of congestive heart failure Sunday, Sept. 26, at the New Jersey Veterans Memorial Home in Vineland. After returning home from World War II, Mr. Alessandrini took the postal service exam and became a mail carrier in his native South Philadelphia. He rose through the ranks and became superintendent of Post Office Station D in South Philadelphia before taking the promotion of chief postal systems and finance examiner of Southeastern Pennsylvania, which covered Philadelphia.
NEWS
August 26, 2011 | Associated Press
BALTIMORE - Former Cy Young Award winner Mike Flanagan died of a self-inflicted shotgun wound to the head, the Maryland medical examiner ruled Thursday. A police investigation revealed that the 59-year-old pitcher was upset about financial issues. He left no note. Flanagan's body was found Wednesday afternoon about 250 feet behind his home. An investigation showed he was home alone. Flanagan won the AL Cy Young Award in 1979 and helped the Baltimore Orioles win the 1983 World Series.
NEWS
September 21, 1998 | by Kitty Caparella, Daily News Staff Writer
Reputed mob boss Ralph Natale should spend 16 months in jail on parole violations for meeting with his underboss, other mobsters and convicted felons, a federal hearing examiner told the U.S. Parole Commission last week. The commission is expected make a final determination on the violations shortly. Natale's lawyers, Marc Neff and Carmen C. Nasuti, vowed to appeal the ruling if it means jail time for their client. Patricia Denton, the examiner, made her recommendation after a 4 1/2-hour hearing on Sept.
NEWS
August 4, 1988 | By LESLIE SCISM, Daily News Staff Writer Staff writer Joe O'Dowd contributed to this report
At 4:05 p.m. yesterday, Yvette Green, her mother and an aunt threw their arms in the air and let out cries of relief. "Oh, thank God!" Green screamed, tears sliding down her tired face. "Thank God! "It is not my fault. I would never, ever neglect my children. " The three women, seated in Green's third-floor apartment above a North Philadelphia corner bar, had just found what little silver lining there was in the death Tuesday of Green's 4-month-old daughter, Shareena: The medical examiner's office ruled the child had died of natural causes.
NEWS
May 16, 1996 | by Frank Dougherty, Daily News Staff Writer
The other shoe SEPTA was waiting for just dropped! Hearing examiner John Miller has warned if SEPTA attempts to resolve a $75 million deficit in its 1997 operating budget through layoffs and service cuts, it will create a "death spiral" for its riders. "I would recommend that the SEPTA board vote against the 1997 operating budget, realizing that such a vote may be purely symbolic and, perhaps, like tilting at windmills," Miller wrote. SEPTA needs $748 million to fund its 1997 operating budget.
NEWS
May 13, 1988 | By ROBIN PALLEY, Daily News Staff Writer
With better management, St. Mary Hospital could stay open and turn a profit, an examiner who studied the hospital's records said yesterday. "The decision to close the hospital was based on inadequate information . . . based more on the moral judgment of the Sisters (of St. Francis, founders of the hospital) rather than the best interest of the bankrupt estate," court-appointed examiner George L. Miller said. Still, the court should move to close the hospital and liquidate its assets - unless funding is found to subsidize its operation until a buyer comes forward, Miller's report concluded.
NEWS
March 18, 1995 | by Kurt Heine and Kitty Caparella, Daily News Staff Writers
Blond beauty Valerie Sheridan - stoned on cocaine and booze - dozed off and accidentally slipped beneath the waters of socialite Harry Jay Katz's hot tub, the medical examiner's office has concluded. The cause of death for the 35-year-old Roxborough woman was declared to be drowning due to multiple drug and alcohol intoxication, said Barry Dickman, a medical examiner's spokesman. The death was an accident, he said. The drugs included an assortment of prescription medicines and cocaine, a source said.
BUSINESS
April 13, 2004 | By Todd Mason INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Bucks County lender hid losses on its books in "almost comical proportions," according to a report by the company's court-appointed examiner. The report, filed last week in U.S. Bankruptcy Court in Delaware, is the first accounting of a baffling standoff last year between DVI Inc., of Jamison, and Deloitte & Touche, its auditing firm. The auditor resigned in June, withholding its approval of DVI's quarterly financial report. The company said Deloitte wanted more information on a financial transaction.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
REAL_ESTATE
July 25, 2016 | By Alan J. Heavens, Staff Writer
In the space tagged either "The Build" or "The Art of the Deal" in this section, I try to strike a balance between market-rate and affordable-housing developments in the city and the suburbs. I find the projects that are rising in the "edge" neighborhoods the most interesting ones. Because I have been writing about real estate here since 1989, I have seen these neighborhoods in various stages of decline and development. Although you might have issues with some of the ramifications of development, it's safe to say that most of us prefer it to continued decline.
NEWS
June 26, 2016 | By Melanie Burney, Staff Writer
Gov. Christie has again nominated a former North Jersey medical examiner to head the state Medical Examiner's Office. Andrew L. Falzon has served in the top position in an acting capacity, overseeing the troubled system for the last year. The position has been vacant since 2003. The permanent appointment, announced Thursday night by Christie's office, needs confirmation by the Senate. Christie first nominated Falzon in June 2015. But the Senate didn't act, so the governor nominated Falzon again for the new legislative session.
NEWS
May 21, 2016 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Staff Writer
Defense lawyers lit into U.S. Rep. Chaka Fattah's hired political gun Thursday in a dogged cross-examination of the man who has emerged as a key witness in the government's racketeering conspiracy case. It remains to be seen whether their attacks on Thomas Lindenfeld, the chief strategist behind Fattah's failed 2007 mayoral bid, were enough to sway the federal jury weighing the fates of the congressman and his four codefendants. In six hours of testimony, Lindenfeld parsed words with the smoothness of a man who had spent the last three decades working in Washington politics.
BUSINESS
May 11, 2016 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Staff Writer
Memo to the Pennsylvania Convention Center Authority from Pennsylvania Labor Relations Board hearing examiner Jack E. Marino: Get over it. Marino didn't use those words in his 18-page opinion, in which he declined to recuse himself from considering unfair labor practice charges filed against the authority by the Carpenters union after it lost working jurisdiction in the center in May 2014. But they convey his meaning. "Unfavorable rulings are the very nature of our business," Marino wrote.
NEWS
April 2, 2016 | By Michael Boren, Staff Writer
The attorney for David "D.J. " Creato Jr., the Haddon Township father charged with killing his 3-year-old son, Brendan, filed motions in court Thursday to prevent prosecutors from using Creato's statement to investigators as evidence, and to have the indictment against his client dismissed. The motions suggest Creato, 22, who was indicted by a grand jury on charges of murder and endangering the welfare of a child, was not read his rights or told he was a suspect when he willingly spoke to investigators in the days after Brendan's body was found.
NEWS
March 14, 2016
ISSUE | CITY BIDDING Examine all aspects The city intends to improve its bidding process ("Reverse bidding: City sees big savings," Tuesday). But what about fundamental aspects: What's the level of participation on the bids? If the response is low, why? Once the bid is awarded, is the contractor required to provide what the contract stipulates? These issues are more important than the mechanics of the bid process. |Mike Egan, Philadelphia, mchlegan@gmail.com
NEWS
January 31, 2016 | By Mari A. Schaefer, STAFF WRITER
Four years ago when the family of Paul Brasberger learned of his sudden death, their first thoughts were that he was murdered. On Friday, despite the chilly temperatures, about a dozen family and friends gathered in front of the Delaware County courthouse to bring attention to his death - which they contend has not been investigated thoroughly. "We are never going to stop until we get justice," said Mark Brasberger, Paul's brother. Paul Brasberger, 49, died suddenly of what a Delaware County medical examiner first told his family may have been heart disease.
NEWS
January 23, 2016 | By Sam Wood, Staff Writer
Nearly a week after Vice President Biden visited Philadelphia to announce a new federal "moon shot" to battle cancer, the heads of six leading Pennsylvania cancer centers and other experts gathered in Center City on Thursday to discuss treatment and prevention developments, and sort the promise from the hype. The six directors were panelists at "Cancer Precision Medicine, Big Ideas in Research, Treatment and Prevention," a half-day conference at the College of Physicians of Philadelphia.
NEWS
December 18, 2015 | BY JULIE SHAW, Staff Writer
NO VERDICT YET for Kathryn Knott, the 25-year-old woman accused of inciting and participating in an assault on a gay couple in Center City last year. Jurors deliberated for a second day Thursday, and about 4:15 p.m. they wanted to go home. The Philadelphia Common Pleas panel of eight women and four men will resume deliberations Friday morning. Knott, 25, of Southampton, Bucks County, faces two counts each of aggravated assault, simple assault and reckless endangerment. She also faces one count of conspiracy to commit aggravated assault.
NEWS
November 15, 2015 | By Sandy Bauers, For The Inquirer
In addition to the medical and emotional toll, the financial cost of cancer can be overwhelming. On average, some of the newer drugs run to $10,000 a month, with some exceeding $30,000 a month, according to the American Society of Clinical Oncology, a group of about 35,000 cancer professionals. ASCO and another group, the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN), have begun developing guidelines and tools to help physicians, patients, and their families assess efficacy, toxicity, and costs of the various treatment options.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|