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Examiner

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NEWS
May 11, 1996 | by Frank Dougherty, Daily News Staff Writer
The independent examiner who chaired SEPTA's 1997 capital budget hearings said he has no choice but to recommend that the SEPTA board adopt a budget he fears is "flirting with disaster. " It's a $268 million plan that will force SEPTA commuters to make do - or do without well into the 21st century, warned examiner Robert B. Johnston. It "will substantially reduce replacement and/or expansion of SEPTA facilities, thereby reducing SEPTA's ability to serve the region," Johnston said.
NEWS
August 14, 1991 | By John P. Martin, Special to The Inquirer
Lee Franczyk expected to have a license to drive when he walked out of the state troopers' barracks in Trevose last month. But the only ride he got was out the door - allegedly on the foot of an irate license examiner who was unable to put on the brakes during a verbal dispute. Yesterday, state police filed assault charges against John J. Simons, an examiner for eight years, in the July 20 attack on Franczyk, 20, of Hellerman Street in Philadelphia. "He literally kicked the kid out," said David Zellis, senior deputy district attorney in Bucks County.
NEWS
October 7, 2010
Ilio Alessandrini, 87, of Buena Vista, former chief postal systems and finance examiner of Southeastern Pennsylvania, died of congestive heart failure Sunday, Sept. 26, at the New Jersey Veterans Memorial Home in Vineland. After returning home from World War II, Mr. Alessandrini took the postal service exam and became a mail carrier in his native South Philadelphia. He rose through the ranks and became superintendent of Post Office Station D in South Philadelphia before taking the promotion of chief postal systems and finance examiner of Southeastern Pennsylvania, which covered Philadelphia.
NEWS
August 26, 2011 | Associated Press
BALTIMORE - Former Cy Young Award winner Mike Flanagan died of a self-inflicted shotgun wound to the head, the Maryland medical examiner ruled Thursday. A police investigation revealed that the 59-year-old pitcher was upset about financial issues. He left no note. Flanagan's body was found Wednesday afternoon about 250 feet behind his home. An investigation showed he was home alone. Flanagan won the AL Cy Young Award in 1979 and helped the Baltimore Orioles win the 1983 World Series.
NEWS
September 21, 1998 | by Kitty Caparella, Daily News Staff Writer
Reputed mob boss Ralph Natale should spend 16 months in jail on parole violations for meeting with his underboss, other mobsters and convicted felons, a federal hearing examiner told the U.S. Parole Commission last week. The commission is expected make a final determination on the violations shortly. Natale's lawyers, Marc Neff and Carmen C. Nasuti, vowed to appeal the ruling if it means jail time for their client. Patricia Denton, the examiner, made her recommendation after a 4 1/2-hour hearing on Sept.
NEWS
August 4, 1988 | By LESLIE SCISM, Daily News Staff Writer Staff writer Joe O'Dowd contributed to this report
At 4:05 p.m. yesterday, Yvette Green, her mother and an aunt threw their arms in the air and let out cries of relief. "Oh, thank God!" Green screamed, tears sliding down her tired face. "Thank God! "It is not my fault. I would never, ever neglect my children. " The three women, seated in Green's third-floor apartment above a North Philadelphia corner bar, had just found what little silver lining there was in the death Tuesday of Green's 4-month-old daughter, Shareena: The medical examiner's office ruled the child had died of natural causes.
NEWS
May 16, 1996 | by Frank Dougherty, Daily News Staff Writer
The other shoe SEPTA was waiting for just dropped! Hearing examiner John Miller has warned if SEPTA attempts to resolve a $75 million deficit in its 1997 operating budget through layoffs and service cuts, it will create a "death spiral" for its riders. "I would recommend that the SEPTA board vote against the 1997 operating budget, realizing that such a vote may be purely symbolic and, perhaps, like tilting at windmills," Miller wrote. SEPTA needs $748 million to fund its 1997 operating budget.
NEWS
May 13, 1988 | By ROBIN PALLEY, Daily News Staff Writer
With better management, St. Mary Hospital could stay open and turn a profit, an examiner who studied the hospital's records said yesterday. "The decision to close the hospital was based on inadequate information . . . based more on the moral judgment of the Sisters (of St. Francis, founders of the hospital) rather than the best interest of the bankrupt estate," court-appointed examiner George L. Miller said. Still, the court should move to close the hospital and liquidate its assets - unless funding is found to subsidize its operation until a buyer comes forward, Miller's report concluded.
NEWS
March 18, 1995 | by Kurt Heine and Kitty Caparella, Daily News Staff Writers
Blond beauty Valerie Sheridan - stoned on cocaine and booze - dozed off and accidentally slipped beneath the waters of socialite Harry Jay Katz's hot tub, the medical examiner's office has concluded. The cause of death for the 35-year-old Roxborough woman was declared to be drowning due to multiple drug and alcohol intoxication, said Barry Dickman, a medical examiner's spokesman. The death was an accident, he said. The drugs included an assortment of prescription medicines and cocaine, a source said.
BUSINESS
April 13, 2004 | By Todd Mason INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Bucks County lender hid losses on its books in "almost comical proportions," according to a report by the company's court-appointed examiner. The report, filed last week in U.S. Bankruptcy Court in Delaware, is the first accounting of a baffling standoff last year between DVI Inc., of Jamison, and Deloitte & Touche, its auditing firm. The auditor resigned in June, withholding its approval of DVI's quarterly financial report. The company said Deloitte wanted more information on a financial transaction.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 29, 2015 | By Howard Gensler
AFTER MONTHS of speculation about what killed Bobbi Kristina Brown and whether foul play was involved, medical examiners in Atlanta have found no obvious cause of death or significant injuries. The Fulton County Medical Examiner's Office began its autopsy yesterday on the daughter of Whitney Houston and Bobby Brown and said that there was no evidence of previously unknown medical conditions. Bobbi Kristina died Sunday in hospice care nearly six months after being found unresponsive in a bathtub inside her suburban Atlanta townhouse.
SPORTS
June 10, 2015 | BY BOB COONEY, Daily News Staff Writer cooneyb@phillynews.com
WHEN CLEVELAND Cavaliers guard Matthew Dellavedova went to the foul line with 10.1 seconds of overtime remaining in Game 2 of the NBA Finals on Sunday night, 76ers coach Brett Brown saw a look he has become very familiar with through the years. "He bit down on that mouthpiece, grabbed the ball from the ref and bam, bam. He nailed both of them without any hesitation," said Brown, sounding a bit like a fan, more like a proud father. Dellavedova's two makes gave the Cavaliers a 94-93 lead in what eventually turned into a 95-93 win, evening the series with the Golden State Warriors at one game each.
NEWS
June 10, 2015 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gov. Christie has nominated a former North Jersey medical examiner to head the State Medical Examiner's Office, an agency that has for years been without a leader. Andrew L. Falzon, a previous medical examiner for Middlesex and Monmouth Counties, would oversee a system that has come under criticism over the years, including by its former leaders. Falzon - who state records indicate graduated in 1986 from the University of Malta, a small country of islands south of Italy - was a forensic pathology fellow at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, according to the school.
NEWS
June 8, 2015 | By Barbara Boyer, Inquirer Staff Writer
When the Somerset County prosecutor concluded in March that Cooper Health System CEO John P. Sheridan Jr. killed his wife, set their house on fire, and then committed suicide, it reignited concerns about the competency of New Jersey's medical examiner system. By ruling the deaths a murder-suicide, the prosecutor's office closed the high-profile case. But the couple's four sons, who believe both their parents were murdered in September in their Montgomery Township home, have asked the state Attorney General's Office for a new investigation.
NEWS
May 11, 2015 | BY MORGAN ZALOT, Daily News Staff Writer zalotm@phillynews.com, 215-854-5928
DURING GRAPHIC testimony yesterday, a former Philadelphia deputy medical examiner snaked a belt around prosecutor Peter Lim's neck, demonstrating for a jury how he believes Dr. Melissa Ketunuti's killer tightened a leather belt around her neck before setting her body on fire. Dr. Gary Collins, now Delaware's chief medical examiner, testified for the prosecution on the third day of trial for 39-year-old Jason Smith. Smith is the exterminator accused of killing Ketunuti, 35, before binding her neck, wrists and ankles and setting her body ablaze Jan. 21, 2013 when he visited her Southwest Center City rowhouse to address a rodent problem.
BUSINESS
April 25, 2015 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
State regulators are seeking a special inquiry into a new Peco Energy Co. rate proposal that would affect commercial customers who produce some of their own power. The Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission on Thursday voted to investigate Peco's $190 million electric rate filing, a routine action that guarantees the proposal will be assigned to an administrative law judge for hearings and undergo scrutiny for up to seven months. In a joint statement, Chairman Robert F. Powelson and Commissioner Gladys M. Brown raised specific questions about Peco's proposal to replace the Auxiliary Service Rider in its existing rates with a new Capacity Reservation Rider.
NEWS
March 20, 2015 | BY JENELLE JANCI, Daily News Staff Writer jancij@phillynews.com, 215-568-5906
WHEN THE Liberian Women's Chorus for Change performed for soldiers involved in that country's civil war, Philadelphia Folklore Project Director of Programs Toni Shapiro-Phim said that some in the audience were so moved that they handed their guns to the performers as a sign of peace. The artists from the same group performed in different communities with people of varied ethnic backgrounds as a model for reconciliation in the country, Shapiro-Phim said. Shapiro-Phim said these are perfect examples of what the PFP's event tomorrow, "Peacebuilding and Traditional Arts: A Forum," will discuss - how traditional arts and social-justice work can combine to create positive change in communities.
NEWS
February 8, 2015 | By Matt Gelb, Inquirer Staff Writer
Denise McGovern remembered at least five times in which she asked that Margarita Garabito send her stepdaughter to a doctor for a physical exam. Teachers told McGovern, the nurse at Feltonville Intermediate School, that Charlenni Ferreira had trouble walking. She could not keep pace with other students. The school nurse stapled an additional paper to the school-mandated physical form, asking that a doctor examine Ferreira's hip and hobbled gait. She wanted Ferreira, a 10-year-old fifth grader, to undergo physical therapy.
BUSINESS
February 4, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Union carpenters and Teamsters angling to regain their jobs at the Convention Center had their hopes thwarted Monday when a hearing examiner for the Pennsylvania Labor Relations Board said the board did not have jurisdiction to handle a complaint filed by the two unions. The unions, which have been staging protests outside the Convention Center for months, lost the right to work there in May, when they did not sign a new customer-satisfaction agreement by a deadline set by the Pennsylvania Convention Center Authority board.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
The supernatural TV series, so long stuck in the familiar territory of ghosts, goblins, and vampires, took a strange and interesting turn last year with several fascinating dramas, including The Leftovers on HBO, ABC's Resurrection , The Returned on Sundance, and, last but not least, the chilling procedural Intruders on BBC America. Each told the story of people who traversed the line between life and death - transgressing both categories. They challenged long-held theological views and our usual way of depicting ghosts as ethereal higher beings.
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