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Exchange Program

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NEWS
April 26, 1992 | By Michael Lear-Olimpi, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Parlez-vous francais? Well, you do not have to know how to speak French to help some young people from France learn more about the United States - and improve their English. International Exchange Opportunities Inc. is looking for host families in the region for 50 to 100 French visitors ages 14 to 21 who will participate in a cultural and language-enrichment program this summer. "It's a chance to see America firsthand," said program director Mike Di Sandro of Washington Township.
NEWS
December 21, 1986 | By Suzanne Gordon, Inquirer Staff Writer
If four foreign exchange programs progress as planned, 80 Haverford High School students will be spending several weeks next spring in France, Italy, Spain and West Germany. The Haverford school board Thursday night approved the expanded foreign exchange program, which had been limited to an annual exchange with a school in Germany for the past 13 years. A fifth exchange proposed with a school in Buckingham, England, had to be scrapped after school officials notified Haverford this week that they had to back out of the program.
NEWS
July 25, 1996 | By Marguerite P. Jones, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Academic Year in the USA International, a high school exchange program, is now offering a full scholarship in China for this fall. The semester-long scholarship includes living with a Chinese family, courses in calligraphy and history, international airfare and orientation. There is no language requirement for the program; a tutor will be provided. Applications must be received by Aug. 10. AYUSA also needs families to host high school exchange students from China. The Chinese students will live with volunteer host families and attend local schools.
NEWS
November 1, 1990 | By David McClendon, Special to The Inquirer
Anya Yelfimova, 16, a soft-spoken girl with long, brown hair and deep-set, soulful eyes, is determined to be successful so that she can help her country, the Soviet Union, tackle its problems. She's also smart enough to know that sometimes to help your home, you have to experience things out of home. That is one reason she and nine classmates from Leningrad's School No. 80 in the Soviet Union's largest republic, Russia, jumped at the opportunity to visit the United States, she said.
NEWS
February 16, 2000
Graphic pamphlets for prostitutes: No. Needle exchanges for AIDS prevention: Yes-plus. That's our opinion as City Council convenes for budget hearings today on the Health Department's funding for next year. We called for a re-evaluation of AIDS prevention programs last week when we had to wonder, once again, at the judgment of Prevention Point, the nonprofit organization that gets $300,000 from the city Health Department and runs Philadelphia's needle exchange program.
NEWS
January 3, 1988 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
U.S. Rep. Curt Weldon (R., Pa.), a junior member of the House Armed Services Committee and a longtime Russian affairs buff, is to visit Moscow this week for an exchange program that will include a meeting with Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev. The trip will be paid for by the American Council for Young Political Leaders, a bipartisan, nonprofit Washington foundation, that sponsors exchanges with foreign countries, principally the Soviet Union, Weldon said. Founded in the early 1970s, the council aims to promote international understanding by sponsoring exchange visits by political leaders who are 40 years old or younger.
NEWS
July 10, 1988 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
For the last 11 years, Marc Kasher, 18, of Bryn Mawr, has spent the summer at a New Hampshire camp. But Kasher, who recently graduated from The Shipley School in Bryn Mawr, cut short his camping vacation this year to do something a little different: to study and to travel for a month in the Soviet Union as part of what organizers are calling the first-ever, national high-school exchange program with the Soviet Union. Yesterday, Kasher and 20 other students from throughout the United States reported to Bryn Mawr College for an orientation session designed to prepare them for their monthlong Soviet sojourn.
BUSINESS
November 16, 2012 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
More than 1,000 foreign college students who came to the United States for a cultural exchange but ended up working long hours for below minimum wage in a warehouse packaging Hershey's candy will receive back pay, the U.S. Department of Labor announced Wednesday. Three companies will pay $213,042 to 1,028 students who worked at the warehouse in Palmyra, Pa., between November 2009 and October 2011. The students made headlines in August 2011 when they went on strike over their situation and the complicated hiring process behind it. "I feel deeply inspired today, because our strike has had the incredible result of exposing and addressing the fundamental problems facing so many workers," Chinese student Chen Wen said in a statement from the National Guestworker Alliance, an advocacy group.
NEWS
January 31, 1993 | By Marguerite P. Jones, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
In Port Antonio, Jamaica, they know plenty about tropical fruits and vegetables. In Doylestown, the specialities are agribusiness and entrepreneurship. But in the next few years, agriculture students and faculty in these distant locations will become more proficient in areas they now know little about. Delaware Valley College in Doylestown Township is launching an extensive exchange program with the College of Agriculture in Port Antonio to share information and broaden its international outreach.
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SPORTS
February 20, 2015 | By Mike Jensen, Inquirer Columnist
What's the path that took Kadir Burton, a 15-year-old freshman at KIPP DuBois Collegiate Academy, to soccer fields in Nicaragua and Colombia? You might say it began on the 52 bus, with a transfer to the 65, eventually getting Burton from his school in West Philadelphia to Main Street in Manayunk, to the Starfinder soccer facility, where Burton plays three afternoons a week. That was just the start of the journey last month. The U.S. State Department had helped set up an exchange program for countries that try to use soccer as a tool for social development.
NEWS
August 4, 2014 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
As the Gaza conflict drags on, Iraq has faded from the headlines, even though the country is falling to pieces. So it was intriguing to meet a terrific group of Iraqi college students at Temple University on a State Department exchange program that introduces them to religious pluralism in America. Needless to say, I wondered whether they could apply these lessons in Iraq. The impressive five-week program run by Temple's Dialogue Institute exposed the five Iraqis - along with Lebanese, Turkish, and Egyptian peers - to a dizzying variety of religions as well as the U.S. protections for religious freedom.
NEWS
June 20, 2013 | By Barbara Boyer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mi casa, su casa . An exchange program for Spanish teenagers is looking for families in Camden County who would like to host students for the month of July. Fifteen students and a chaperone are coming from July 1 to 29, and eight students have been placed in host homes. "They're sharing their culture and you're sharing the American way of life," said Dan Herman, a coordinator for the Greater Cherry Hill area for Global Friendships, a homestay program for international students who travel abroad.
BUSINESS
November 16, 2012 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
More than 1,000 foreign college students who came to the United States for a cultural exchange but ended up working long hours for below minimum wage in a warehouse packaging Hershey's candy will receive back pay, the U.S. Department of Labor announced Wednesday. Three companies will pay $213,042 to 1,028 students who worked at the warehouse in Palmyra, Pa., between November 2009 and October 2011. The students made headlines in August 2011 when they went on strike over their situation and the complicated hiring process behind it. "I feel deeply inspired today, because our strike has had the incredible result of exposing and addressing the fundamental problems facing so many workers," Chinese student Chen Wen said in a statement from the National Guestworker Alliance, an advocacy group.
BUSINESS
August 20, 2011 | By Jingwen Hu, Inquirer Staff Writer
"Hershey, Hershey, can't you see," the protesters sang, "what justice means to me?" Led by a man wearing a silver hoopskirt on his head with chains draped over his shoulder (an enslaved Hershey's Kiss), some 30 Philadelphians protested at Sixth and Market Streets on Friday, championing the cause of some 375 J-1 visa students working at a Hershey warehouse in Palmyra, Lebanon County. Backed by National Guestworker Alliance and union leaders, the students say they were misled about the exchange program.
NEWS
August 5, 2011 | BY JASON NARK, narkj@phillynews.com 215-854-5916
"JERSEY SHORE" made a blockbuster trade earlier this year, dumping a group of boorish, bronzed clowns on Europe in exchange for hundreds of studious young men and women, eager to make money and soak up the American experience. We gave the world "Snooki" and "The Situation. " The world gave us Aytac and Olesia. The cast of MTV's "Jersey Shore," according to published reports, didn't have a personal renaissance in Florence. They spent their time racking up fines, beating each other up, and butchering the native tongue while the country collectively referred to the crew as "tamarri," Italian for uncultured or vulgar.
NEWS
April 2, 2011 | By Kia Gregory, Inquirer Staff Writer
As family members headed to their seats, 15 inmates at Cambria Community Center waited nervously in the wings for their big day. They were the first class of students in almost two decades to take college-credit courses in the Philadelphia prison system, city and prison officials say. And in a celebration Friday morning, in their prison blues, they received certificates for completing their first semester. The prison system offers literacy programs, GED courses, and job-readiness workshops.
NEWS
April 8, 2010 | By Claudia Vargas INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Charles A. Evers, 58, of Philadelphia, an architect whose love of historic structures took him all over the world, including several expeditions to Egypt, died of a heart attack Wednesday, March 31, at his home. Mr. Evers worked on the restoration of more than a dozen historical structures and sites in the area, including the Roman and Etruscan galleries at the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, the Fort Mifflin Commandant's House in Philadelphia, and the Rogers Locomotive Works in Paterson, N.J. He also created master plans for several churches throughout the country.
NEWS
November 3, 2008 | By Megan DeMarco INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
"How many students are in your classes?" "Is the food different?" "Do you celebrate Halloween?" "How long have you been a principal?" A class of fourth graders at Marlton Elementary School fired these and other questions last Thursday at Janet Saltanovich, an Argentinian principal on a three-week visit to the school as part of the Fulbright Administrator Exchange Program. Saltanovich answered in her native Spanish, with translations by Julio Feldman, Marlton Elementary's principal, who will visit Saltanovich's school in C?rdoba, Argentina, this summer.
NEWS
March 21, 2008
So? When Vice President Cheney was told by a reporter that two-thirds of Americans are against the war in Iraq, his response was, "So?" ("President sees start to victory in Iraq," March 20). Let's examine that response. Almost 4,000 American men and women dead and thousands maimed. "So?" About $3 billion spent per week during a recession. War costs projected at $1 trillion. I could go on, but let's look at the bright side. For the first time in five years, the White House is finally being honest with the American people.
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