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NEWS
September 30, 2013 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
Put aside, for a moment, the histrionic claims that Republicans want to keep millions of Americans from getting health insurance and that the Democrats' long game is to establish socialist hegemony over health care. Beneath the rhetoric are persistent concerns that Obamacare will fall flat on its face. These critiques come mostly from President Obama's conservative foes, but also from some Democrats. Chief among them is the fear that not enough young Americans will buy insurance through the online marketplaces.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 1988 | By John Corr, Inquirer Staff Writer
Midnight. Fourth and South Streets. Punks and drunks flirt and lurch. Horns blare. People scurry or loiter. The aroma of frying beef sidles across the intersection with onions on its breath. A half-block to the south, in a place called Chaos, the woman with purple hair is sneering at the compact-disc threat while a loudspeaker assaults the sidewalk with the atonal spasms of the Shaved Pigs. "I don't sweat CDs," says Kathy Hughes, co-owner of Chaos, a record- exchange store at 619 S. Fourth St., thereby echoing the sentiments of owners of several similar establishments in this area.
SPORTS
September 8, 2011
   Tickets from Tuesday night's game against the Braves at Citizens Bank Park may be exchanged for the Pavilion, Pavilion Deck, or Terrace Deck seating area for one of six games during the 2012 season: Exhibition games against Pittsburgh on April 2 or April 3. Both games are scheduled to begin at 7:05 p.m. Any of four Monday home games between April 30 and May 21. The opponents and times are to be determined.    Fans should maintain possession of Tuesday night's tickets - listed as Sept.
NEWS
August 12, 2013 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
  Health insurance marketplaces in Pennsylvania and New Jersey are open - but not for business. People who need health insurance can now go online to www.healthcare.gov and create an account with a user name, password, and security questions so they will be ready to go when enrollment begins Oct. 1. When the exchanges do open for business, Pennsylvanians will find as many as 15 insurers - including Independence Blue Cross and Aetna but...
BUSINESS
November 16, 1989 | The Inquirer Staff
The Securities and Exchange Commission will ask stock exchanges to voluntarily test the capabilities and security of their computer systems under a policy adopted yesterday. The SEC wants the industry to conduct studies to assess their systems' capacity to handle heavy volume and their vulnerability to natural catastrophes and human tampering. Another aim of the policy is to persuade exchanges to establish contingency plans and develop backup facilities to be used in the event of a system failure.
BUSINESS
June 22, 2015 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
After countless hours of courtroom argument, dozens of briefs, and seemingly endless legal maneuvering, the fate of President Obama's Affordable Care Act comes down to the meaning of six simple words. On June 28, 2012, when the U.S. Supreme Court first narrowly upheld the law, it seemed the bitter struggle over Obama's huge expansion of federally funded health care had come to an end. But the calm was short-lived. Within a few months, conservative legal theorists seized on a little-noticed sentence in the law that seemed to limit federal assistance for consumers to buy health insurance purchased on state-established exchanges, or marketplaces.
BUSINESS
October 25, 2013 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
GlaxoSmithKline P.L.C. is the latest large company to save money now and in years to come by shifting medical costs for future retirees from its company-sponsored plan to insurance policies purchased individually on health-care exchanges. The London-based drugmaker with about 5,000 employees in Pennsylvania and New Jersey said Wednesday that it saved about $431.8 million for the third quarter of this year because of changes it explained to employees in September related to postretirement medical obligations.
NEWS
November 10, 2012 | By Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Trying to show flexibility without slowing down President Obama's health-care law, the administration said Friday that states can have more time to work out their roles in providing health care to millions of uninsured Americans. In a letter to governors, Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius said she still wants to hear by the end of next week whether states will be setting up health insurance markets under the law. But governors can now take another month, until mid-December, to submit detailed blueprints.
NEWS
February 23, 2012
The Obama administration announced Wednesday grants of $33.8 million to Pennsylvania and $7.7 million to New Jersey to move to the next level of planning for state-run insurance exchanges. The so-called establishment grants are a key step in an ongoing process to create the exchanges, which are among the most popular and least controversial parts of the federal health-care overhaul. Sometimes described as the sort of one-stop shopping available from online travel sites, the exchanges are expected to transform buying health insurance for tens of millions of people who get coverage individually or from small businesses.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 27, 2015 | By Chris Mondics and Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writers
In its second ruling in three years upholding President Obama's health-care law, the U.S. Supreme Court on Thursday turned back challengers' claims that the law barred health insurance subsidies to millions in 34 states, including Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and Delaware. The 6-3 opinion, written by Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr., upheld a central pillar of the Affordable Care Act and allows the administration's five-year-old initiative to get health coverage to more Americans. The decision lifted a cloud that threatened to end coverage for millions of Americans, disrupt state insurance markets, and pressure politicians whose constituents receive the subsidies to find a way to save them.
NEWS
June 26, 2015 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Within minutes of Thursday's Supreme Court ruling, Gov. Wolf announced plans to drop the state-based insurance exchange that Pennsylvania had pursued to prevent more than 300,000 residents from losing subsidies. "I took steps to protect Pennsylvania's consumers by putting in place a contingency in the event the Supreme Court ruled people are not eligible for subsidies, but I am pleased to say that we will no longer need to rely on this plan," Wolf said in a statement. Pennsylvania and Delaware were the only states to win conditional approval last week to set up exchanges to protect their citizens from a potential ruling against subsidies in the 34 states that rely on the federal health insurance marketplace.
NEWS
June 23, 2015 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Barbara Butler takes home $250 a week for driving a school bus with blind children to a Catholic day school part time. Her health insurance premiums are $517 a month. She pays 76 cents, and Washington picks up the rest. The Supreme Court is expected to rule within a week on whether that subsidy, a key part of President Obama's health-care law, is legal in 34 states. If it decides not, then the West Philadelphia resident's premiums would swell to half her income. "Fortunately for me, I'm pretty healthy," Butler said.
BUSINESS
June 22, 2015 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
After countless hours of courtroom argument, dozens of briefs, and seemingly endless legal maneuvering, the fate of President Obama's Affordable Care Act comes down to the meaning of six simple words. On June 28, 2012, when the U.S. Supreme Court first narrowly upheld the law, it seemed the bitter struggle over Obama's huge expansion of federally funded health care had come to an end. But the calm was short-lived. Within a few months, conservative legal theorists seized on a little-noticed sentence in the law that seemed to limit federal assistance for consumers to buy health insurance purchased on state-established exchanges, or marketplaces.
NEWS
June 17, 2015 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Obama administration on Monday gave Pennsylvania and Delaware a head start in the scramble to save residents from losing health insurance coverage, the possible result of a U.S. Supreme Court ruling expected this month. The action - conditional approval to establish state-based insurance marketplaces - moves forward both states' efforts to preserve health insurance subsidies for their citizens. Pennsylvania Insurance Commissioner Teresa Miller described it as a "contingency plan" with the potential to help more than 300,000 residents who had bought subsidized insurance.
SPORTS
June 14, 2015 | By Matt Breen, Inquirer Staff Writer
PITTSBURGH - Ken Giles sat on a dugout bench as his manager and pitching coach yelled in his face. The emotionally charged pitcher barked back after the eighth inning of Friday night's game against the Pittsburgh Pirates at PNC Park. Giles had loaded the bases in the eighth inning on his own error and a pair of walks, one of which was intentional. He appeared to seethe throughout the inning. Pitching coach Bob McClure visited the mound. Catcher Cameron Rupp made his own trek to calm down the pitcher before they intentionally walked Pedro Alvarez.
NEWS
June 12, 2015 | BY JOE BRANDT, Daily News Staff Writer brandtj@phillynews.com, 215-854-4890
MELISSA ALVAREZ enjoys it when police officers behave like pals. "This officer just took a selfie with me, the other greeted us with high-fives," said the 17-year-old Frankford resident, who is also president of the Philadelphia Youth Commission. "I want to see more officers like that!" Alvarez was one of several panelists at "Securing our Future," a meeting on community policing yesterday in City Hall organized by several groups including the Police Advisory Commission, the Philadelphia Commission on Human Relations and the mayor's office.
NEWS
June 4, 2015 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gov. Wolf this week formally proposed setting up a state-based insurance marketplace, potentially protecting hundreds of thousands of Pennsylvania residents from the consequences of a Supreme Court decision that could gut Obamacare later this month. A ruling against the Affordable Care Act could end insurance subsidies for millions of people who live in the 37 states - including Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and Delaware - that rely on the federal marketplace. The 13 that set up state marketplaces two years ago would not be affected.
BUSINESS
January 29, 2015 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Drugmaker Pfizer Inc. might grow, or break up, or some combination of both. Chief executive officer Ian Read said Tuesday that Pfizer will keep looking for companies to buy and is taking the next steps to see whether its pieces are worth more than the sum of its parts. Pfizer has said that it tried to buy AstraZeneca in 2014, and it reportedly inquired about buying Actavis and Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd. AstraZeneca, Teva, and Actavis all have operations in the Philadelphia region.
NEWS
January 12, 2015 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
Fifteen years ago, two Philadelphians with a shared affinity for classic cars, world affairs, and Cuba formed a quirky nonprofit that some now say was prescient. Their group, TailLight Diplomacy, sprung from the notion that the estimated 50,000, pre-1960, Detroit-built "Yanktanks" - the vintage cars still rolling in Cuba - could unite car enthusiasts from America and the island nation for groundbreaking exchanges. Founders Rick Shnitzler and John Dowlin corresponded with Cuban officials.
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