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Executive Assistant

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NEWS
June 5, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Johanna Carrozzino Adamczyk, 78, of Radnor, an executive assistant, died Saturday, May 31, at Lankenau Hospital of complications after surgery. She had battled multiple sclerosis for 30 years. A native of Philadelphia, Mrs. Adamczyk graduated with Notre Dame Academy (Rittenhouse Square)'s Class of 1952 and the University of Pennsylvania's Class of 1956. She worked in advertising for 15 years, writing copy for an agency in Philadelphia. Later, she became an executive assistant to the owner of Cullen Construction Co., with offices in Bryn Mawr and Wayne.
NEWS
January 31, 1990 | By Patrisia Gonzales, Inquirer Staff Writer
Interim Camden Mayor Aaron A. Thompson yesterday named Charles A. Ashley, a retired executive of Bell Atlantic Corp., as his executive assistant. Ashley, a longtime friend of the mayor's, will oversee the day-to-day operations of the mayor's office and serve as Thompson's "political representative," according to a news release. City Council will consider approving Ashley's $50,000-a-year salary for the full-time job at its meeting tomorrow. Ashley replaces Lewis Wilson, counsel to former Mayor Randy Primas, as chief adviser to the mayor.
NEWS
September 8, 2005 | By Dwight Ott INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Some high-profile members of Camden's Hispanic community voiced dissatisfaction yesterday over the reassignment, at reduced pay, of the most visible Latino member of Mayor Gwendolyn Faison's cabinet. Yolanda Aguilar de Neely served as the mayor's executive assistant during her hotly fought reelection campaign this year and was at Faison's side during many public appearances. This week, she was back where she started, as a mayor's aide. Her salary will drop to $69,791 from the $79,981 she earned as executive assistant.
NEWS
September 10, 1989 | By Petria May, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Philadelphia Historical Commission has decided to defer demolition of the Hall-Wiley House for six months to allow time to find alternatives to tearing it down. At its Aug. 31 meeting, the Historical Commission questioned the renovation cost estimates from the Fairmount Park Commission, said Richard Tyler, the historic preservation officer. The Park Commission has said that repairs to the 18th-century farmhouse in Pennypack Park could cost $50,000 to $150,000. Now it is up to the Park and Historic Commissions to find an acceptable use for the building.
NEWS
August 31, 2001 | By Steve Esack INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Mary A. Givens Kane, 96, of Lower Merion, executive assistant to four directors of the Philadelphia Museum of Art, died of cancer Monday at Harley Nursing Home in Springfield, Delaware County. Mrs. Kane was born in South Philadelphia and graduated from John W. Hallahan Catholic High School for Girls in 1922 and in 1924 from the Philadelphia Normal School with a teacher's certificate, although she never worked as a teacher. Her first job was at the Curtis Publishing Co.'s Saturday Evening Post, where she took dictation and frequently complained about the company's required pace of typing 100 words a minute, said her brother, George Givens.
NEWS
December 10, 1999 | By Rusty Pray, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Natalie Saxe Randall, 76, a former aide to a mayor and an advocate for many museums, died Wednesday of lymphoma at her home in East Falls. As executive assistant to the late Mayor Richardson Dilworth, Mrs. Randall saw her boss through his service as mayor of Philadelphia, two unsuccessful runs for governor of Pennsylvania, and a tenure as president of the Philadelphia Board of Education. As a representative in Harrisburg of a dozen Pennsylvania museums and cultural institutions - including Philadelphia's Franklin Institute, Academy of Natural Sciences, and Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts - she "did not overlook the smallest detail" in her effort to pry funding from the state, said Joel Bloom, retired executive director of the Franklin Institute.
NEWS
August 21, 2001 | By Kay Raftery INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Patricia McGettigan Coyle, 50, of Churchville, a union board member and former executive assistant with the United Food and Commercial Workers Union, died of cancer Saturday at St. Mary Medical Center in Langhorne. Mrs. Coyle was born in Paisley, Scotland, and came to Philadelphia when she was a toddler. She graduated from St. Hubert Catholic High School for Girls in Philadelphia and went to work as a practical nurse in a pediatrician's office. In 1981, she joined the Retail Clerks Union Local 1357 as a secretary and stayed with the union through various mergers to become executive assistant to the president of United Food and Commercial Workers Local 1776 in Philadelphia.
NEWS
June 25, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Carmen Garcia Morski, 89, who retired in 1989 as an Inquirer newsroom executive assistant, died of cancer Sunday, June 21, at Spring Arbor of Outer Banks, an assisted living community in Kill Devil Hills, N.C., where she had lived for the last three years. Gene Foreman, retired deputy editor of The Inquirer, recalled in an e-mail that Mrs. Morski "was an executive assistant who supported the work of several senior editors. " In that role, Foreman said, "Carmen was a capable professional and a congenial colleague.
NEWS
May 10, 2010 | By Sam Wood, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Zane David Memeger was sworn in Monday morning to become the 58th United States attorney for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania. Memeger, nominated by President Obama last month, was confirmed May 5 by the U.S. Senate in a unanimous vote. As the region's top federal prosecutor, Memeger will decide which prosecutions go forward and determine which attorneys are assigned to specific cases. He will run an office of 130 lawyers and almost as many staff members. Along with Philadelphia, the district covers Delaware, Montgomery, Chester, Bucks, Lancaster, Berks, Lehigh and Northampton Counties.
NEWS
April 15, 1990 | By Chuck McDevitt, Special to The Inquirer
Nicholas A. Panagoplos of Upper Darby has been selected by the National Reference Institute of Washington for inclusion in the 1990 issue of Who's Who in American Education. Panagoplos is employed by the School District of Philadelphia, where he has served as a teacher, supervisor, vice principal and executive assistant in the office of curriculum. George W. Franz, an assistant professor of history at the Delaware County Campus of Pennsylvania State University in Middletown, has been awarded the university's George W. Atherton Award for excellence in teaching.
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NEWS
June 25, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Carmen Garcia Morski, 89, who retired in 1989 as an Inquirer newsroom executive assistant, died of cancer Sunday, June 21, at Spring Arbor of Outer Banks, an assisted living community in Kill Devil Hills, N.C., where she had lived for the last three years. Gene Foreman, retired deputy editor of The Inquirer, recalled in an e-mail that Mrs. Morski "was an executive assistant who supported the work of several senior editors. " In that role, Foreman said, "Carmen was a capable professional and a congenial colleague.
NEWS
February 27, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
LILLIE WELLS was known for her polish and grace, and one of her goals in life was to help young women of color attain the same qualities. Lillie dedicated a large portion of her life to helping others, and one of the many roles she assumed was to mentor young African-American women with the aim of showing them how to thrive in both the social world and the marketplace. "She would expose them to art and culture, the social graces, etiquette and other qualities they would need to succeed in the professional world," her family said.
NEWS
June 5, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Johanna Carrozzino Adamczyk, 78, of Radnor, an executive assistant, died Saturday, May 31, at Lankenau Hospital of complications after surgery. She had battled multiple sclerosis for 30 years. A native of Philadelphia, Mrs. Adamczyk graduated with Notre Dame Academy (Rittenhouse Square)'s Class of 1952 and the University of Pennsylvania's Class of 1956. She worked in advertising for 15 years, writing copy for an agency in Philadelphia. Later, she became an executive assistant to the owner of Cullen Construction Co., with offices in Bryn Mawr and Wayne.
NEWS
September 18, 2013 | BY WILL BUNCH, Daily News Staff Writer bunchw@phillynews.com, 215-854-2957
THIS TIME, the killer wore blue, and he reportedly used an AR-15 assault rifle and possibly a handgun and a shotgun as he rained down death into an office cafeteria and randomly fired at passers-by in the third-floor hallway. This time, the target was a sprawling U.S. Navy facility in an industrial pocket of Washington, D.C., near the new Nationals ballpark and in the shadow of the U.S. Capitol, where thousands of workers started their day and 12 of them would end up murdered. This time, the gunman was a 34-year-old Navy veteran who'd been born in Brooklyn, then recently worked in a Thai restaurant near Fort Worth, Texas - a student of Buddhism with a reputed violent streak and a couple of brushes with the law. The shooting at the Washington Navy Yard felt numbingly like the last time - December's massacre that claimed 26 lives at a Connecticut elementary school - and the time before that.
NEWS
December 23, 2012 | By Alfred Lubrano, Carolyn Davis, and Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writers
Many residents in the region joined a nationwide moment of silence Friday morning to honor the victims of the Newtown, Conn., shootings. At 9:30, Mayor Nutter asked students from Samuel Powel Elementary School in West Philadelphia to close their eyes, "play the quiet game for 30 seconds or so," and "think about something really good. " Most of the students, gathered at nearby Metropolitan Baptist Church for their winter concert, did not know why Nutter made the request. Faculty and many parents had not shared the information, principal Kimberly Ellerbee said, adding that students had asked very few questions about the Dec. 14 killings.
NEWS
November 30, 2012
Here are the 25 nonunion school district employees that got raises since the end of last school year. NAME  // TITLE  // OLD SALARY // NEW SALARY *Michelle Armstrong  // Director, career and technical education  // $74,353   //$92,000 *John Barber  // Director, grants compliance   //$66,000   //$81,000 Jennifer Barry  // Assistant director, financial services  // $73,929   //$85,029 *Martina Boardley  // Regional access...
NEWS
November 29, 2012 | THE WASHINGTON POST
PLANO, TEXAS - In Zig Ziglar's world, the morning alarm rang on the "opportunity clock. " And "if you aren't on fire" when you get to work, "then your wood is wet. " And you have to remember that "money's not the most important thing in life, but it's reasonably close to oxygen. " And there will be setbacks, but "failure is an event, not a person. " Ziglar, a motivational speaker whose "Success Rallies," "Born to Win" seminars, more than 25 self-help books and countless audiotapes attracted millions of devoted followers with homespun advice on career advancement and moral uplift, died Nov. 28 at a hospital in the Dallas suburb of Plano.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 2012 | Ellen Gray
VEEP. 10 p.m. Sunday, HBO. "What have I been missing here?" asks Vice President Selina Meyer (Julia Louis-Dreyfus) as she prepares to make nice with a senator (Kate Burton) she hopes will get her out of a tight spot with the plastics industry. "Power," replies the senator, who only pretends to be joking. That's one exchange from the Sunday premiere of HBO's satiric, and hilariously profane "Veep" that doesn't require the insertion of dashes. It also sums up the predicament in which the holder of what our first vice president, John Adams, called "the most insignificant office that ever the invention of man contrived" finds herself after losing her party's nomination to a man who apparently stopped calling as soon as she'd helped get him elected.
NEWS
March 23, 2012 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Charles A. Ashley, 85, of Camden, a retired Bell Telephone executive and community activist, died Monday, March 12, at home. Mr. Ashley joined Bell Telephone Co. of Pennsylvania as a sales manager on the Main Line in 1965. He eventually became a district manager in Pennsylvania, and was responsible for overseeing affirmative-action compliance and the hiring, promotion, and transfer of nonmanagement employees there and in Delaware. He was instrumental in hiring minorities and implemented a mentoring program, a nephew, Michael Ashley, said.
NEWS
August 17, 2011 | By Robert Strauss, For The Inquirer
Amanda Cuccinello whipped through the ninth-10th-grade lower hallways like Dale Earnhardt Jr. through a straightaway, leading her dozen or so charges through a whirlwind tour of what will be, in three weeks, their new home for four years. "The first day of school, don't go to the locker room, go straight to the gym for gym class," said Cuccinello, one of the incoming seniors leading freshmen through the Washington Township High School Freshman Transition Camp on Monday. "Mostly you will be in I, L, and K Pods, but if you are five or 10 minutes late, you should go to I-102, and if you are later than that . . . " "Oh, my God," said Alley Stricker, one of the freshmen, trying to follow it all. And several others in the group echoed her sentiment.
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