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Executor

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NEWS
March 27, 1986 | By Suzanne Gordon, Inquirer Staff Writer
It is viewed by many as one of life's most difficult tasks. It crops up at the worst possible time. It is a complicated job that has no training and no guidelines and is fraught with legal technicalities that only a professional financial planner would be expected to know. The job is that of executor of an estate. And not many people designated as executors learn about their role beforehand. Knowing that, two Philadelphia-area estate-law experts have written The Executor's Manual, a 462-page textbook-type volume that describes the duties, the pitfalls and psychological problems that an executor may encounter.
NEWS
February 16, 1990 | By Lacy McCrary, Inquirer Staff Writer
After 18 months of deliberation, a Bucks County judge has ordered a suspended Philadelphia lawyer removed as executor of an Olney factory worker's modest estate at the request of the man's heirs. Common Pleas Judge Leonard B. Sokolove, declaring that Virginia Funk's performance in administering several other estates was "despicable," said the estate of the late Francis T. Sulecki would be jeopardized if she became the executor. Funk, a lawyer since 1951 in the Olney section of the city, was placed on inactive status in 1985 by the state Supreme Court because of mental disability.
NEWS
October 9, 2010 | By Sam Wood and Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writers
A New York real estate tycoon has been ordered by a Bucks County judge to pay $10 million to the heirs of the late Philadelphia landlord Samuel Rappaport. Richard Basciano, a real estate investor the New York Times once called "the undisputed king of Times Square porn," had been close to Rappaport. Before he died in 1994, Rappaport named Basciano the executor of his estate. Rappaport's extensive holdings included the old Philadelphia Saving Fund Society bank on Walnut Street and other vacant and decaying Center City landmarks, former Reading Co. properties, Atlantic City's sewer system, properties on the Boardwalk, parking garages, a Florida resort, and a prime building site adjoining the University of Delaware.
SPORTS
July 17, 2002 | Daily News Wire Services
The family feud over Ted Williams' body deepened yesterday when his will showed he wanted to be cremated, while the executor of his estate said the slugger later decided to be frozen. In the will that was filed and made public yesterday in Inverness, Fla., Williams said he wanted his ashes "sprinkled at sea off the coast of Florida where the water is very deep. " But after he wrote his will on Dec. 20, 1996, the Hall of Famer expressed a desire to have his body frozen, according to the executor, Albert Cassidy.
NEWS
April 4, 2001 | By Stephan Salisbury INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The controversial effort to sell the historic Dream Garden mosaic may have reached a turning point precipitated by the death of the executor of the estate of art patron John W. Merriam, owner of the Maxfield Parrish-Louis Comfort Tiffany mural. Merriam's widow, Elizabeth, who was known as Betty, had been sole executor of his $119 million estate, which has been seeking to remove and sell the five-ton, 49-foot-long mural since 1998. The glass mosaic work is in the Curtis Center on Washington Square.
NEWS
December 15, 1994 | By L. Stuart Ditzen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The ponytailed butler for the late tobacco heiress Doris Duke, beseiged all year long by allegations that he used fraud and undue influence to gain control of Duke's $1.2 billion estate, has a new legal fight on his hands. A former chef and two other ex-employees of Duke's estate say in a recently filed lawsuit in New York that the butler, Bernard Lafferty, has been on drug and alcohol binges since Duke's death. The suit, seeking millions in damages, says Lafferty has wrecked one of the heiress' cars, physically attacked members of her staff, and uttered death threats against those who challenge him as executor of the estate.
NEWS
November 19, 1997 | By Erin Einhorn, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Two potential heirs whom Lydia Alexander vaguely named as "Russian relatives" in her 1986 will were cheated of their right to a $120,000 inheritance, a Bucks County judge ruled yesterday. After deliberating six months on the complicated case, Judge Leonard B. Sokolove ordered that regardless of a statute that closes all estates after five years, the three children's hospitals that originally received money from Alexander's estate should return every cent to the heirs: Irina and Alexander Okropiridze.
SPORTS
June 30, 2016 | By Les Bowen, Staff Writer
WHEN FORMER Eagles coach Buddy Ryan passed away Tuesday, initial reports listed his age as 82. Among those was a press release from the Eagles. But Ryan was really 85, his longtime agent and executor Jim Solano later confirmed. "Buddy Ryan was born on Feb. 17, 1931," Solano said. "There are two stories about why it was always listed wrong; I don't know which one is true. Either the Jets just got it wrong when they hired him (in 1968), or Buddy told them the wrong date because he wanted them to think he was younger" as a first-time NFL assistant, who would have been about to turn 37. "This wasn't an issue until he filed for social security" and had to provide documentation, Solano said.
NEWS
June 20, 2012 | Harry Gross
DEAR HARRY: A couple of years ago, my sister asked me to sit with her while her lawyer drew up her will. She has no children and no husband. She does have three younger brothers and three younger sisters. I am the only one older than this sister. There are too many nieces and nephews to count. The will was pretty standard, according to the lawyer, with everything going equally to her brothers and sisters. If any had died before her, their share would go to their children. The lawyer told me he'd send me a copy of the will, which never happened.
NEWS
November 7, 1989 | By Lacy McCrary, Inquirer Staff Writer
Francis Thomas Sulecki, an Olney factory worker for more than four decades, has been dead and buried for almost two years now. And even though he left about $70,000 in cash, his funeral has not been paid for. Part of the cemetery expenses have not been paid. And his money has not been given to his heirs. In fact, his estate has been tied in a legal knot since his death, at age 87, on Jan. 11, 1988, because of his spur-of-the-moment decision to visit a lawyer about 7 1/2 years before.
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SPORTS
June 30, 2016 | By Les Bowen, Staff Writer
WHEN FORMER Eagles coach Buddy Ryan passed away Tuesday, initial reports listed his age as 82. Among those was a press release from the Eagles. But Ryan was really 85, his longtime agent and executor Jim Solano later confirmed. "Buddy Ryan was born on Feb. 17, 1931," Solano said. "There are two stories about why it was always listed wrong; I don't know which one is true. Either the Jets just got it wrong when they hired him (in 1968), or Buddy told them the wrong date because he wanted them to think he was younger" as a first-time NFL assistant, who would have been about to turn 37. "This wasn't an issue until he filed for social security" and had to provide documentation, Solano said.
NEWS
February 19, 2013
D EAR HARRY: We are both in our late 70s, and we live in a retirement community in South Jersey. For the last six months, we have been considering making a will. We have a pretty substantial estate and no children. We do have nieces and nephews and two favorite charities that we want as heirs. We are faced with a number of dilemmas, especially regarding our nieces and nephews. One of our nieces has been particularly attentive. She helped us move, helped us get over the emotional stress of the move, always offers to shop for us, and does many other things.
NEWS
June 20, 2012 | Harry Gross
DEAR HARRY: A couple of years ago, my sister asked me to sit with her while her lawyer drew up her will. She has no children and no husband. She does have three younger brothers and three younger sisters. I am the only one older than this sister. There are too many nieces and nephews to count. The will was pretty standard, according to the lawyer, with everything going equally to her brothers and sisters. If any had died before her, their share would go to their children. The lawyer told me he'd send me a copy of the will, which never happened.
NEWS
September 19, 2011 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Hilda Schrager Silverblatt, 91, of Center City, literary executor and first cousin of Holocaust poet Selma Meerbaum-Eisinger, died of cancer Wednesday, Sept. 14, at Wissahickon Hospice in Bala Cynwyd. In 2008, an English translation of Meerbaum-Eisinger's Harvest of Blossoms: Poems From a Life Cut Short was published by Northwestern University. The book was edited by Mrs. Silverblatt's twin daughters, Helene and Irene. Written in German, the book had been published in Israel and Germany to literary acclaim.
NEWS
April 19, 2011
Dear Harry: I am among the old old living from SS check to SS check. My younger sister just died, and I discovered that she had named me as the executor of her will. The estate is not very large, but it appears that there will be six beneficiaries. Some of these beneficiaries want me to resign as executor because I am not able to leave my home to do the things that are necessary, like probating the will and accumulating her assets. I believe they may have other motives as well. Is there some way I can get help without having to use up a substantial portion of the estate on legal fees?
NEWS
October 9, 2010 | By Sam Wood and Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writers
A New York real estate tycoon has been ordered by a Bucks County judge to pay $10 million to the heirs of the late Philadelphia landlord Samuel Rappaport. Richard Basciano, a real estate investor the New York Times once called "the undisputed king of Times Square porn," had been close to Rappaport. Before he died in 1994, Rappaport named Basciano the executor of his estate. Rappaport's extensive holdings included the old Philadelphia Saving Fund Society bank on Walnut Street and other vacant and decaying Center City landmarks, former Reading Co. properties, Atlantic City's sewer system, properties on the Boardwalk, parking garages, a Florida resort, and a prime building site adjoining the University of Delaware.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 7, 2009 | By HOWARD GENSLER Daily News wire services contributed to this report
FOR THE time being, Katherine Jackson is going to have to be fulfilled taking care of Michael Jackson's kids. She won't be taking care of his money. L.A. Superior Court Judge Mitchell Beckloff yesterday ruled against Katherine and backed attorney John Branca and music executive John McClain, who had been designated in Jackson's 2002 will as the people he wanted to administer his estate. Attorneys for Katherine repeatedly objected to their appointment at the court hearing. "It's our desire to do everything we can to carry out Michael Jackson's wishes and to maximize the estate," said Howard Weitzman, who spoke on behalf of Branca.
NEWS
September 23, 2004 | By Larry King INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Inquirer is attempting to join a legal effort to open the long-impounded estate files of the late U.S. Sen. John Heinz. In papers filed yesterday in Allegheny County Orphans' Court, lawyers for Philadelphia Newspapers Inc. seek permission to join four other newspapers in a petition to unseal the records. Heinz was killed April 4, 1991, in a midair collision over Merion Elementary School in Lower Merion. Four pilots and two 6-year-old girls in the schoolyard also died when a helicopter and Heinz's chartered airplane collided and crashed to the ground.
NEWS
August 30, 2003
There ought to be a law against what happened to Ronnie Mich, the 61-year-old autistic man from Camden County who was robbed of his $1.2 million inheritance. In fact, New Jersey State Sen. Stephen Sweeney (D., Gloucester) plans to introduce a bill this fall that could be just such a safeguard. It would give the state Superior Court oversight over administration of estates - accountability that is sadly absent now. Executors would have to post a bond to the court and provide accountings of all assets twice a year until the final accounting.
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