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Exercise Equipment

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BUSINESS
March 11, 1987 | By Richard Burke, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Campbell Soup Co. announced yesterday that it was putting up for sale its Triangle Manufacturing Co. subsidiary, which was acquired four years ago by the Camden company in a move to cash in on the physical-fitness craze sweeping the nation. The move essentially ends Campbell's expansion into the health-and-fitness market, Campbell spokesman James H. Moran said yesterday. When Campbell acquired Triangle, the soup company was seeking stronger identification with athletics through its advertising for V-8 vegetable juice and sponsorship of the U.S. Olympic teams in figure skating and field hockey.
NEWS
October 25, 1989 | By Isabel Forgang, New York Daily News
You'll have no excuse for missing a workout if you set up a home gym. However, exercise equipment can represent a sizable investment (state-of- the-art computerized machines cost $2,000 to $4,500), so know your goals (weight loss? strength? flexibility?) before choosing equipment, says Philip Rosenthal, assistant director of the Nicholas Institute of Sports Medicine and Athletic Trauma at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York, and try before you buy. Call a friend who has a stationary bike or rowing machine, or buy a health club guest pass and try out the cross-country skier and treadmill.
NEWS
June 12, 1993 | PAUL HU/ DAILY NEWS
The first two white (not albino) lions ever to make North American zoo- goers blink, roar their official welcome today in Philadelphia. Jezebel and Vinkel checked out the accommodations and the exercise equipment yesterday, and ignored a group of Amish visitors.
NEWS
July 5, 2014 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
The director of the University of Pennsylvania's campus fitness center was fired after being charged with stealing cash and items from the lost-and-found area. Amy M. Wagner's departure in May became public Thursday in an article on the website of the student newspaper, the Daily Pennsylvanian. The affidavit of probable cause filed May 8 in Philadelphia Municipal Court accuses Wagner of the theft of an unspecified amount of cash "entrusted to her as a university employee," and unspecified items from the lost-and-found.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 2012 | By Art Carey, Inquirer Columnist
Roger Schwab is an impressive advertisement for his profession. At age 67, the owner and president of Main Line Health & Fitness in Bryn Mawr has an enviable physique. In recent months, however, he's been able to defy the usual rules of time and aging by improving his body even more. He has added six pounds of muscle, and when he flexes his biceps, the belly of the muscle is as big and full as it was when he was an iron-pumping stud in his 20s. "That's not supposed to happen," Schwab marvels.
BUSINESS
July 8, 1987 | By Charles V. Zehren, Inquirer Staff Writer
Campbell Soup Co. yesterday said that it sold its Triangle Manufacturing Corp. subsidiary, which manufactures exercise equipment, to St. Lawrence Manufacturing Canada Inc. for an undisclosed amount of cash. Campbell acquired privately held Triangle in March 1983 in an attempt to benefit from the nation's burgeoning interest in physical fitness, said Campbell spokesman James H. Moran. At the time, the Camden-based food company also was seeking stronger identification with athletics through its advertising for V-8 vegetable juice and sponsorship of the U.S. Olympic teams in figure skating and field hockey, he said.
NEWS
September 12, 2014
BASEMENTS, basically by definition, are the ugly and unloved stepchildren of any tiered structure. A damp, dank place to stack cardboard boxes full of ex-lovers' stuff. A resting place for never-used exercise equipment. A sunlight-free ecosystem perfect for the cultivation of cobwebs and dust bunnies. An eminently unsafe hiding place for psychotic clowns armed with blood-stained garden equipment. (Just me?) But none of these subterranean stereotypes, even the totally rational killer-clown one, apply to what lies beneath the Reading Terminal Market, one of Philadelphia's most recognized historical and culinary contributions.
NEWS
December 29, 2014 | By Art Carey, For The Inquirer
This is the time when many of us pledge to do better in the new year. Among the top resolutions routinely are to lose weight and get more exercise. Before joining the health club or buying fitness equipment, you may want to read a provocative new book, Exercise Will Hurt You: Concussion, Traumatic Brain Injury, and How the Dangers of Sports and Exercise Can Affect Your Health. The author is Steven Barrer, director of the Neurosciences Institute and former chief of the division of neurosurgery at Abington Memorial Hospital.
NEWS
September 29, 1990 | By Judi Sheppard Missett, Special to The Inquirer
Many Americans have purchased elaborate exercise equipment. But how many of us are really committed to using it? Before investing money in weight machines and exercise cycles that may end up as clothes racks, try working out with what you have. Aerobic activities, such as brisk walking, jogging and swimming, can be done without equipment. Keep in mind that the exercise should be done three to five times a week for no less than 20 minutes. The activity should raise your heart rate to a "training level" of 60 to 90 percent of your maximum heart rate.
BUSINESS
January 12, 1992 | By Susan Q. Stranahan, Inquirer Staff Writer
Meet Walt "I'm Becoming a Couch Potato" Stencler of Pottstown. Middle-aged. An active spring and summer gardener who vegetates the rest of the year. Worried about his blood pressure and the few pounds he put on during the Christmas season. Stencler and his wife, Connie, know they should get more exercise. Even so, two stationary bicycles they bought in recent years went Goodbye Garage Sale. "They're so boring," says Walt. Connie concurs. Now meet Kim Piersall, trim, brimming with fitness and enthusiasm.
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NEWS
December 29, 2014 | By Art Carey, For The Inquirer
This is the time when many of us pledge to do better in the new year. Among the top resolutions routinely are to lose weight and get more exercise. Before joining the health club or buying fitness equipment, you may want to read a provocative new book, Exercise Will Hurt You: Concussion, Traumatic Brain Injury, and How the Dangers of Sports and Exercise Can Affect Your Health. The author is Steven Barrer, director of the Neurosciences Institute and former chief of the division of neurosurgery at Abington Memorial Hospital.
NEWS
September 12, 2014
BASEMENTS, basically by definition, are the ugly and unloved stepchildren of any tiered structure. A damp, dank place to stack cardboard boxes full of ex-lovers' stuff. A resting place for never-used exercise equipment. A sunlight-free ecosystem perfect for the cultivation of cobwebs and dust bunnies. An eminently unsafe hiding place for psychotic clowns armed with blood-stained garden equipment. (Just me?) But none of these subterranean stereotypes, even the totally rational killer-clown one, apply to what lies beneath the Reading Terminal Market, one of Philadelphia's most recognized historical and culinary contributions.
NEWS
July 5, 2014 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
The director of the University of Pennsylvania's campus fitness center was fired after being charged with stealing cash and items from the lost-and-found area. Amy M. Wagner's departure in May became public Thursday in an article on the website of the student newspaper, the Daily Pennsylvanian. The affidavit of probable cause filed May 8 in Philadelphia Municipal Court accuses Wagner of the theft of an unspecified amount of cash "entrusted to her as a university employee," and unspecified items from the lost-and-found.
NEWS
August 13, 2013
HUNLOCK CREEK, Pa. - Sixty-three-year-old Bill DeWeese works out with Muslims from Philadelphia. "They're fired up and focused and extremely fit," he says. "I have a very intense workout schedule," he adds, including weight training, playing on a softball team and taking a "fitness-over-40" class three times a week. This is courtesy of taxpayers. It takes place in Retreat state prison, an old and isolated medium-security facility along the Susquehanna River behind fences and seven rows of razor wire just southwest of Wilkes-Barre.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 2012 | By Art Carey, Inquirer Columnist
Roger Schwab is an impressive advertisement for his profession. At age 67, the owner and president of Main Line Health & Fitness in Bryn Mawr has an enviable physique. In recent months, however, he's been able to defy the usual rules of time and aging by improving his body even more. He has added six pounds of muscle, and when he flexes his biceps, the belly of the muscle is as big and full as it was when he was an iron-pumping stud in his 20s. "That's not supposed to happen," Schwab marvels.
SPORTS
July 25, 2012
New Orleans Hornets first-round draft choices Anthony Davis and Austin Rivers have signed their rookie contracts. The moves, announced by the club on Tuesday, are formalities for players chosen in the first round. The values of their rookie deals are outlined in the NBA's collective-bargaining agreement. As the first pick in this summer's draft, the 6-foot-11 Davis receives a three-year guaranteed contract worth a little more than $16 million, with just over $5 million paid in the first year.
NEWS
October 4, 2010 | By Art Carey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Justin McGinley's commute to his second job takes seconds. That's because his "office" is the garage of his Cherry Hill ranch house. The 12-by-18-foot space is equipped with the tools of his trade: dumbbells, barbells, kettlebells, rowing machines. By day, McGinley, 30, is an information technology consultant. Before and after work, he's a personal trainer. Assisted by his wife, Alycia, 28, he helps clients build better bodies through a mode of conditioning called CrossFit. CrossFit, which has attracted devotees across the land, is the physical equivalent of a liberal arts education: wide-ranging and inclusive.
NEWS
July 30, 2002 | By Marc Schogol INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When Philadelphia Sports Clubs recently opened a new venue in the old Ardmore theater, it might have looked like a good idea on steroids. There was the Main Line YMCA two blocks away, the well-established Main Line Health & Fitness center in nearby Bryn Mawr, and other exercise emporiums great and small along Lancaster Avenue. But John Smallwood, director of real estate and acquisitions for New York-based Town Sports International, says he's just warming up. Since leasing the theater site and opening in March, Philadelphia Sports Clubs has signed up about 1,000 members.
NEWS
March 20, 2001 | By Nicole Barnes-Nelson INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Ed Sielski wanted to maintain his active lifestyle after retiring last year, and the gym was the ideal place to do so. There was one problem. "The accessibility was there, but the equipment wasn't," said Sielski, 57. His search for a gym where he could work out from his wheelchair had been going on sporadically for 29 years. Six months ago, the former auto and truck center owner glimpsed the Brandywine YMCA's mission statement, to "enrich the quality of life for all people.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 1995 | By Stephen Seplow, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's 6 a.m., life's twilight hour, when suffering insomniacs begin sharing the world with eager early risers, and on Philadelphia television a man named Covert Bailey is selling an exercise machine called the Health Rider; Casey Kasem, the top-40 disc jockey, is selling Tony Robbins' personal-improvement tapes; Cathy Rigby, the once-famous gymnast, is selling another exercise machine known as Fast Track; and Benny Hinn and Oral Roberts are teamed up...
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