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Exotic Birds

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LIVING
September 4, 1995 | By Denise-Marie Santiago, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When Tracy Pedersen was a little girl, she had a fox, a crow and a boa constrictor for pets, not to mention the raccoon that slept in her room. The one that tested her parents' tolerance when it destroyed the family bathroom. She had fantasy safaris, in which she pretended to travel in exotic lands to photograph and paint wild animals. It was her dream to grow up and go on real expeditions abroad. Unlike most of the rest of us, her childhood dream has come true. Today, Pedersen is an internationally recognized wildlife artist and scientific illustrator.
NEWS
July 24, 2003 | By Morgan Henderson
I was delighted to read that the lost Congo African grey parrot at the Abington SPCA, is now safely back home ("After proving ownership, family and parrot unite," July 22). Unfortunately, these happy endings are rare. In the article, the Abington SPCA spoke of people trying to claim Fire as their own. A word of warning: If you are tempted to adopt, or even steal, a valuable bird like Fire to resell, don't. Yes, exotic caged birds may seem to be the latest popular pet fad, after pot-bellied pigs and fainting goats.
NEWS
August 30, 2011 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
Birders know as well as anyone how hurricanes bring destruction and loss of life. But they also create a little-known birding bonanza, sweeping in species that a local birder might have to travel hundreds of miles or more to see. Some birds can literally travel in the relative calm of the hurricane's eye. Then, when the eye begins to disintegrate, they drop out - finding themselves in a whole new 'hood. After Hurricane Irene rumbled northward Sunday, birders were reporting exotic interlopers across the region.
NEWS
December 20, 1999 | Inquirer photographs by Sarah J. Glover
The scene surrounding the birth of Jesus Christ was brought to life at the First Presbyterian Church's live Nativity in Glassboro yesterday. Above, a goat is led around during the presentation. At left, Julia MacWilliams, who portrayed Jesus' mother, Mary, is surprised by the critters brought to the church. The animals - which included a llama, a pony, goats geese, sheep, rabbits and exotic birds - were on loan from Crystal Wind Acres in Woodstown and Equestrian Run Stables in Williamstown.
NEWS
March 16, 2010 | By KITTY CAPARELLA, caparek@phillynews.com 215-854-5880
Sixty-four animals - from rabbits and doves to exotic birds and dogs - were removed last night from a Fox Chase home by animal-control agents. And inspectors from the city Department of Licenses and Inspections declared that the house, on Hellerman Street near Algon Avenue, was unfit for habitation by either humans or animals. "It was filled with trash, debris and feces and the animals weren't very well-cared-for," said George Bengal, director of law enforcement for the Pennsylvania Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals.
NEWS
May 31, 1987 | By Russell E. Eshleman Jr., Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
Like any other yellow-naped Amazon that sings "Twinkle Twinkle Little Star," Emmie Jones' pet bird Tequilla is a constant source of enjoyment for her. "Parakeets and canaries are very pretty, but they just don't talk like an Amazon," said Jones, a pet-store owner in suburban Harrisburg. "She's just a real pleasure to have. " If legislation pending in the General Assembly becomes law, birds like Tequilla, as well as popular species of parrots and other wild exotic birds, won't be delighting as many bird lovers in the future.
NEWS
March 28, 1992 | by Kitty Caparella and Robin Palley, Daily News Staff Writers
A Philadelphia Warlock motorcycle gang leader - wanted by authorities since 1985 - was arrested with an associate yesterday outside Allentown. Authorities confiscated nearly $1 million in assets the pair allegedly gained from a complex money-laundering scheme, illicit methamphetamine and exotic bird trafficking. The late-morning arrests of Eric C. Martinson, 41, reputed former president of the Philadelphia Warlocks chapter on Woodland Avenue near 56th Street, and Christine Dickson, 23, also were linked by authorities to Irish Republican Army fund-raising efforts in the United States.
NEWS
March 11, 2011 | Inquirer Staff Report
Animal welfare officials have removed 56 animals from a North Philadelphia home after a small fire there. The Pennsylvania SPCA said the animals included chickens, exotic birds, rabbits and four dogs and that they were kept in unsanitary conditions the home on the 1000 block of Glenwood Ave. The SPCA removed the animals Wednesday after the Fire Department put out a small blaze there and found the creatures. The animals were taken to the Pennsylvania SPCA's headquarters on Erie Avenue, where they were evaluated and received veterinary care.
NEWS
May 13, 1989 | By Mary Jane Fine, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jacqui Cornig never counts her cockatiels until they've hatched. So, at last count, including chicks but not eggs, she had 74 of them. Five years ago, there was only Pancho. "Pancho is the head bird," said Cornig, 36, with a nod in his direction. "There actually is a pecking order. Each new male I put into the cage tries to become dominant. " The almost-roomsize cage - four cages, actually, side by side - measures 7 feet high by 7 feet deep by 16 feet long. Cornig unlatched the cage door one recent afternoon at her Malvern home and stepped inside.
NEWS
March 27, 1986 | By Donna Shaw, Inquirer Staff Writer
After finding scores of dead and malnourished puppies, rabbits, piglets and other animals on a filthy rented property, Limerick police said yesterday that they would charge a former curator of the Norristown zoo with cruelty to animals. Police Chief Barry Lenhart said yesterday that the animals were found on land rented by Joseph W. Marchese, 45, of Norristown. He said that Marchese, who described himself to police as a wholesale supplier of animals to pet stores, said he had been unable to tend and feed the animals for three weeks because of illness.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 26, 2013 | By James M. O'Neill, BERGEN RECORD
LITTLE FERRY, N.J. - North Jersey is in the midst of an invasion from Canada. The feathered intruders - finches - ordinarily spend winter far to the north but have been arriving in waves over the last several months, giving birders a rare winter treat. Clouds of redpolls, a species of finch, have taken over a large stand of birches in Losen Slote Creek Park in Little Ferry. "The trees were just loaded with them one morning," said Don Torino, president of the Bergen County Audubon Society.
NEWS
August 30, 2011 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
Birders know as well as anyone how hurricanes bring destruction and loss of life. But they also create a little-known birding bonanza, sweeping in species that a local birder might have to travel hundreds of miles or more to see. Some birds can literally travel in the relative calm of the hurricane's eye. Then, when the eye begins to disintegrate, they drop out - finding themselves in a whole new 'hood. After Hurricane Irene rumbled northward Sunday, birders were reporting exotic interlopers across the region.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 29, 2011
BEVERLY HILLS , CALIF. - We won't see Season 5 of "Mad Men" until next March - production gets underway a week from Monday - but AMC's already ordered Season 6, according to network programming exec Joel Stillerman. Stillerman also confirmed reports that Jon Hamm, who stars as "Mad Men's" Don Draper, will make his directorial debut in the fifth-season premiere. And while he was confirming things, he also noted the departure of executive producer Frank Darabont from "The Walking Dead" and the elevation of one of the show's writers, Glenn Mazzara, to Darabont's role as showrunner.
NEWS
March 11, 2011 | Inquirer Staff Report
Animal welfare officials have removed 56 animals from a North Philadelphia home after a small fire there. The Pennsylvania SPCA said the animals included chickens, exotic birds, rabbits and four dogs and that they were kept in unsanitary conditions the home on the 1000 block of Glenwood Ave. The SPCA removed the animals Wednesday after the Fire Department put out a small blaze there and found the creatures. The animals were taken to the Pennsylvania SPCA's headquarters on Erie Avenue, where they were evaluated and received veterinary care.
NEWS
March 16, 2010 | By KITTY CAPARELLA, caparek@phillynews.com 215-854-5880
Sixty-four animals - from rabbits and doves to exotic birds and dogs - were removed last night from a Fox Chase home by animal-control agents. And inspectors from the city Department of Licenses and Inspections declared that the house, on Hellerman Street near Algon Avenue, was unfit for habitation by either humans or animals. "It was filled with trash, debris and feces and the animals weren't very well-cared-for," said George Bengal, director of law enforcement for the Pennsylvania Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals.
NEWS
December 18, 2009 | By CHRISTINE FLOWERS
LAST WEEK, during a visit to San Francisco (no, I wasn't investigating the "sex tents" mentioned in an earlier column), I took the ferry to Alcatraz Island and had an epiphany: We need another Rock. Before the rehabilitation crowd starts squawking like some of the exotic birds studied by Robert "Birdman of Alcatraz" Stroud, hear me out. Rehabilitation has been the gold standard of the U.S. penal system for the last half century. Experts in the field have reached a consensus that imprisonment is simply a bridge between criminal activity and reintegration into society.
NEWS
March 6, 2009 | By Carlin Romano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Philadelphia Zoo confirmed yesterday that its new $17.5 million McNeil Avian Center, a centerpiece of its sesquicentennial celebrations, was on target to "hatch" on May 30. The center, funded in part by the McNeil family (of McNeil Laboratories) and a Kresge Foundation Challenge Grant, will offer walk-through habitats that include more than 100 exotic birds, such as the rhinoceros hornbill and the violaceous turaco. Also taking off is a Free-Flight Bird Show and 4-D Migration Theater, in which viewers can follow Otis the Oriole on his first migration to Central America after hatching in Fairmount Park.
NEWS
June 15, 2007 | By Sandy Bauers INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When he was a boy in the '60s, Schuylkill Haven nature writer Scott Weidensaul considered the eastern meadowlark a sound track of summer. Ask any New Jersey farmers, and they will wistfully recall the whistles of the bobwhite. Yesterday, the National Audubon Society quantified what birders and other outdoors people have known for years: Many of America's most common bird populations have plummeted over the last 40 years, the bobwhite, the biggest loser, by 82 percent. The message, Weidensaul said, is that "no species is safe" from sweeping landscape changes such as development, loss of wetlands, and pollution from industry.
NEWS
July 24, 2003 | By Morgan Henderson
I was delighted to read that the lost Congo African grey parrot at the Abington SPCA, is now safely back home ("After proving ownership, family and parrot unite," July 22). Unfortunately, these happy endings are rare. In the article, the Abington SPCA spoke of people trying to claim Fire as their own. A word of warning: If you are tempted to adopt, or even steal, a valuable bird like Fire to resell, don't. Yes, exotic caged birds may seem to be the latest popular pet fad, after pot-bellied pigs and fainting goats.
NEWS
August 24, 2002 | By Aparna Surendran INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Trying to protect its animals from the West Nile virus, the Philadelphia Zoo has vaccinated its exotic birds with a horse vaccine that veterinarians hope will work in other species. Other zoos around the country are taking similar precautions. Last summer, five birds at the zoo died of West Nile. There have been no deaths this year. The equine vaccine was given to the birds, starting in April, because no other vaccine for the virus exists, senior veterinarian Keith Hinshaw said.
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