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Expectancy

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ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 2011
I'VE ALWAYS ASSUMED that women live longer than men, which is why I joke with female friends scattered across the country that we'll all meet up in nursing homes when we're little old ladies. We tell each other that we're going to stick together and that one day we'll be taking bus trips to New York and to Atlantic City. But now here comes new info saying that American women in many areas of the United States die at earlier ages than they did even a generation ago. And two of the leading reasons for why this is are things women can do something about: obesity and smoking.
NEWS
May 15, 2011
Retirement planning is no small task. Ideally, you start it in your 20s - though not everyone has the forethought. For the rest of us, these sites provide some direction. Social Security may have an uncertain future, but for now the retirement planner at the Social Security Online site is not a bad place to start investigating the steps to take to prepare for old age. Links go to instructions for applying for benefits and tell when to do so. An eerie life-expectancy calculator will tell you, statistically, how much longer you can expect to live.
NEWS
March 24, 1986 | BY THE ECONOMIST
Winter visitors to Moscow can only admire the healthy determination of the heads bobbing up and down in the steam that rises from the open-air swimming pool down by the Moskva River, not far from the Kremlin. Like every country, Russia has its health freaks. Yet even to the untrained eye, it looks a far from healthy place to live. The diet is poor by Western standards. So is public hygiene (only the foolhardy or the desperate could brave the foul odors and primitive equipment of the public lavatories)
NEWS
December 8, 2002 | By Robert F. O'Neill INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
"We have met the enemy and he is us," declared Pogo years ago in the funny pages. The late Walt Kelly's comic-strip character might well have been referring to older adults who know the path to a longer and healthier life but don't take it. That was the message delivered by Robert Cox, senior investigator at the Lankenau Institute for Medical Research, during a seminar at the Kaiserman Jewish Community Center in Wynnewood. Cox, 65, conducts research related to cardiovascular disease at the Lankenau Institute, on the grounds of Lankenau Hospital, also in Wynnewood.
NEWS
January 19, 1994 | By Thomas J. Brady, with reports from Inquirer wire services
THE SUN ALSO RISES OVER LA RUE ERNEST HEMINGWAY Ernest Hemingway didn't really need a street named after him to immortalize his love affair with Paris, but city officials went ahead and did it anyway. La Rue Ernest Hemingway will be a new street in a redevelopment area of southwestern Paris along the Seine River, a city spokeswoman said. The block-long street will connect Rue Leblanc and Boulevard du General Martial Valin and will border the new Georges Pompidou Hospital.
NEWS
February 21, 2005 | By Mark McDonald INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
A 90-pound chunk of masonry breaks off the facade of a high-rise building and crushes a man on the sidewalk below. Another man, stumbling home from a late-night party, falls in the street, passes out, and freezes to death. Two men break into a railroad yard and die after drinking several quarts of industrial solvent from a tanker car. There are so many odd and horrible ways to die in Russia that it's almost no surprise the average Russian man isn't expected to see his 59th birthday.
NEWS
December 13, 1986 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
The Golden Child whisks Eddie Murphy from Beverly Hills to the foothills of the Himalayas. The move may expand his horizons, but it severely limits Murphy and mutes his usually riotous brand of comedy. After Beverly Hills Cop became a box-office phenomenon in 1984, there was much speculation in Hollywood about what Murphy would do for an encore - other than the inevitable Beverly Hills Cop II. The Golden Child represents a curious choice: a hybrid of the more familiar Murphy humor and a tongue-in- cheek Spielbergian adventure replete with special effects from George Lucas.
NEWS
October 15, 1990 | BY JILL PORTER
Most of us already know that too much of a good thing can be bad for you. But now we find out that too little of a bad thing can be bad for you, too. Cholesterol, to be exact. According to a study published last week, lowering cholesterol reduces your chance of dying from heart disease, which most of us already know. But lowering cholesterol also increases your chance of committing suicide, being murdered or otherwise dying violently or accidentally. I'm not making this up. According to a University of Pittsburgh researcher, for every 100,000 people who cut their cholesterol, there are 28 fewer heart-related deaths - but there are 29 more deaths from suicide, homicide and accidents.
REAL_ESTATE
June 30, 1991 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tony Vizzi rarely gives no for an answer. Especially if the question is "Can you restore my old roof?" "Old roofs can be repaired," the Pottstown roofer insists. "A contractor who says the materials are no longer available is either uninformed or giving you false information. " Eleven years ago, Vizzi was a carpenter, building kitchen cabinets and counter tops. He took a job with friend, who, as a marketing tool, was repairing slate roofs. No one else was. "It was a highly skilled craft, which I liked.
SPORTS
August 26, 2010
WE SHOULD CARE, and we do. We all want to enjoy a long and healthy life, and most of us wish that for everyone else. Still, the harsh truth is that this will not change things. The other day, we learned that former Eagles fullback Kevin Turner was diagnosed with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis - Lou Gehrig's disease. There is no cure for ALS, and the 41-year-old Turner said he as been told by various doctors that he has anywhere from 2 to 15 years to live. Turner said he believes the disease is a result of playing football.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 2, 2016 | BY VALERIE RUSS, Staff Writer
MANY Philadelphians know that Richard Allen founded Mother Bethel African Methodist Episcopal Church after he and fellow pastor Absalom Jones led a walkout from St. George's Methodist Church in Old City in 1787 to protest segregated seating. But V. Yvonne Studevan is certain that most folks don't know about Allen's other civic and humanitarian deeds. "He just made such an impact on the world," said Studevan, a descendant of Allen's. Long before the Civil War, Allen wrote pamphlets calling for the abolition of slavery and helped former slaves find refuge.
NEWS
January 30, 2016 | By Alfred Lubrano, Staff Writer
In the pre-midnight cold, more than 300 people fanned out on Philadelphia streets to count the homeless. Around 3 a.m. Thursday, the job was over, the census of a complex, enigmatic population recorded for another year. The so-called January Point-In-Time Count is carried out annually in cities on the same night throughout America, a requirement of the federal government. By Thursday afternoon, the official results were not in, said Sister Mary Scullion, who runs Project HOME, which takes a lead role in the count.
SPORTS
January 21, 2016 | By Joe Juliano, Staff Writer
Villanova usually has trouble with Seton Hall at the Prudential Center. The Wildcats have lost there twice in the last three years, including last January when the Pirates handed the then-undefeated and sixth-ranked Cats a 66-61 overtime loss. So if that's not bad enough for the No. 4 Wildcats, they now will have to face a team - on Wednesday night in Newark, N.J. - brimming with confidence after Seton Hall's 81-72 victory Saturday on the road over No. 12 Providence. "That's huge," Villanova coach Jay Wright said Tuesday after practice at the Pavilion.
SPORTS
January 15, 2016 | By Vegas Vic, For the Daily News
BRONCOS (-7) over Steelers Goin' down in flames if Ben Roethlisberger can pull of a miracle with his separated shoulder and some torn ligaments. I'm dead in the water. Pittsburgh's offense lives for the vertical game, with an amazing set of speedy receivers. Short routes and little bubble screens? Nah! Not gonna phase the wicked Denver defense. And speaking of Pitt's wideouts, Antonio Brown is still not 100 percent, while running back DeAngelo Williams is still listed as questionable.
NEWS
January 3, 2016
DEAR ABBY: I'm a gay man in my late 40s who has worked for 10 years in the public school system with young adults and kids with special needs. I have done everything from changing preschoolers' diapers, to tutoring, travel training and teaching life skills to older children. In the process, I have encountered my share of cooperation, defiance, failure and success. When speaking with family, friends or strangers about their parenting, I sometimes share my experiences. This is usually accepted and even encouraged, but occasionally I am put in my place by a parent who feels I must be told that what I've done "isn't the same as being a parent.
NEWS
January 3, 2016 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Staff Writer
A fee on shopping bags. Security cameras outside every bar. A ban on cigarette sales at city pharmacies. All were proposed by Philadelphia City Council members last year, but none saw a Council vote. Two were shelved without a hearing. Dozens of bills face the same fate each year. And every four years, at the end of a term, all that leftover legislation is gathered, stamped lapsed, and buried. But this graveyard of bills, which this week will get an influx of new markers, may not be a final resting place for every proposal.
NEWS
December 29, 2015
NEW YORK -With a deeper-than-ever split between Republicans and Democrats over abortion, activists on both sides of the debate foresee a 2016 presidential campaign in which the nominees tackle the volatile topic more aggressively than in past elections. Friction over the issue also is likely to surface in key Senate races. And the opposing camps will be further energized by Republican-led congressional investigations of Planned Parenthood and by Supreme Court consideration of tough anti-abortion laws in Texas.
SPORTS
December 24, 2015 | By Marcus Hayes, Daily News Columnist
SOMEONE NEEDS to shoulder this blame. Just six wins? Gutted by the Cardinals in prime time at home? It's Bill Davis' fault. DeMarco Murray - he's a stiff. Chip Kelly's an arrogant, power-hungry know-it-all. Now, all of those accusations might be fact. It simply is not realistic to expect significant change. Not two years in a row. For any NFL team teetering at mediocrity or just below, Christmastime is, jarringly, the season of projecting rejection and unemployment.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 2015 | By Phil Galewitz, KAISER HEALTH NEWS
The penalty for failing to have health insurance is going up, perhaps even higher than you expected. Among uninsured individuals who are not exempt from the Affordable Care Act penalty, the average household fine for not having insurance in 2015 will be $661, rising to $969 per household in 2016, according to a Kaiser Family Foundation analysis. Individuals will pay the penalty when they complete their federal taxes the following spring. (Kaiser Health News is an editorially independent program of the Foundation.)
SPORTS
December 9, 2015 | By Zach Berman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Chip Kelly saw LeSean McCoy up close for two years, so he did not need to finish game planning to know what to expect when the Buffalo Bills visit on Sunday. Kelly expects to see a heavy dose of McCoy, the Eagles' all-time leading rusher who Kelly unceremoniously traded to the Bills in March. "I know he's having a good year, but I haven't really broken down film or looked at anything like that," Kelly said. "I know he's the focal point of their offense and we have to do a good job of team tackling against him because, obviously, seeing him in person and knowing him, he's going to make the first guy miss, sometimes the second guy miss.
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