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Expectancy

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NEWS
April 7, 2016
By Thomas Farley The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation recently released a map showing shocking differences in health between the rich and the poor in Philadelphia. The map shows that life expectancy at birth in Strawberry Mansion is only 68 years, 20 years shorter than just a few miles away in Society Hill. This 20-year gap isn't right, and it isn't something that we should accept. What's behind these numbers? The biggest killers in Philadelphia are chronic illnesses like heart disease, cancer, and diabetes.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 2011
I'VE ALWAYS ASSUMED that women live longer than men, which is why I joke with female friends scattered across the country that we'll all meet up in nursing homes when we're little old ladies. We tell each other that we're going to stick together and that one day we'll be taking bus trips to New York and to Atlantic City. But now here comes new info saying that American women in many areas of the United States die at earlier ages than they did even a generation ago. And two of the leading reasons for why this is are things women can do something about: obesity and smoking.
NEWS
May 15, 2011
Retirement planning is no small task. Ideally, you start it in your 20s - though not everyone has the forethought. For the rest of us, these sites provide some direction. Social Security may have an uncertain future, but for now the retirement planner at the Social Security Online site is not a bad place to start investigating the steps to take to prepare for old age. Links go to instructions for applying for benefits and tell when to do so. An eerie life-expectancy calculator will tell you, statistically, how much longer you can expect to live.
NEWS
March 24, 1986 | BY THE ECONOMIST
Winter visitors to Moscow can only admire the healthy determination of the heads bobbing up and down in the steam that rises from the open-air swimming pool down by the Moskva River, not far from the Kremlin. Like every country, Russia has its health freaks. Yet even to the untrained eye, it looks a far from healthy place to live. The diet is poor by Western standards. So is public hygiene (only the foolhardy or the desperate could brave the foul odors and primitive equipment of the public lavatories)
NEWS
December 8, 2002 | By Robert F. O'Neill INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
"We have met the enemy and he is us," declared Pogo years ago in the funny pages. The late Walt Kelly's comic-strip character might well have been referring to older adults who know the path to a longer and healthier life but don't take it. That was the message delivered by Robert Cox, senior investigator at the Lankenau Institute for Medical Research, during a seminar at the Kaiserman Jewish Community Center in Wynnewood. Cox, 65, conducts research related to cardiovascular disease at the Lankenau Institute, on the grounds of Lankenau Hospital, also in Wynnewood.
NEWS
January 19, 1994 | By Thomas J. Brady, with reports from Inquirer wire services
THE SUN ALSO RISES OVER LA RUE ERNEST HEMINGWAY Ernest Hemingway didn't really need a street named after him to immortalize his love affair with Paris, but city officials went ahead and did it anyway. La Rue Ernest Hemingway will be a new street in a redevelopment area of southwestern Paris along the Seine River, a city spokeswoman said. The block-long street will connect Rue Leblanc and Boulevard du General Martial Valin and will border the new Georges Pompidou Hospital.
NEWS
February 21, 2005 | By Mark McDonald INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
A 90-pound chunk of masonry breaks off the facade of a high-rise building and crushes a man on the sidewalk below. Another man, stumbling home from a late-night party, falls in the street, passes out, and freezes to death. Two men break into a railroad yard and die after drinking several quarts of industrial solvent from a tanker car. There are so many odd and horrible ways to die in Russia that it's almost no surprise the average Russian man isn't expected to see his 59th birthday.
NEWS
December 13, 1986 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
The Golden Child whisks Eddie Murphy from Beverly Hills to the foothills of the Himalayas. The move may expand his horizons, but it severely limits Murphy and mutes his usually riotous brand of comedy. After Beverly Hills Cop became a box-office phenomenon in 1984, there was much speculation in Hollywood about what Murphy would do for an encore - other than the inevitable Beverly Hills Cop II. The Golden Child represents a curious choice: a hybrid of the more familiar Murphy humor and a tongue-in- cheek Spielbergian adventure replete with special effects from George Lucas.
NEWS
October 15, 1990 | BY JILL PORTER
Most of us already know that too much of a good thing can be bad for you. But now we find out that too little of a bad thing can be bad for you, too. Cholesterol, to be exact. According to a study published last week, lowering cholesterol reduces your chance of dying from heart disease, which most of us already know. But lowering cholesterol also increases your chance of committing suicide, being murdered or otherwise dying violently or accidentally. I'm not making this up. According to a University of Pittsburgh researcher, for every 100,000 people who cut their cholesterol, there are 28 fewer heart-related deaths - but there are 29 more deaths from suicide, homicide and accidents.
REAL_ESTATE
June 30, 1991 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tony Vizzi rarely gives no for an answer. Especially if the question is "Can you restore my old roof?" "Old roofs can be repaired," the Pottstown roofer insists. "A contractor who says the materials are no longer available is either uninformed or giving you false information. " Eleven years ago, Vizzi was a carpenter, building kitchen cabinets and counter tops. He took a job with friend, who, as a marketing tool, was repairing slate roofs. No one else was. "It was a highly skilled craft, which I liked.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 18, 2016 | By Andrew Seidman, TRENTON BUREAU
TRENTON - Gov. Christie said Tuesday that he had not expected to win the endorsement of a high-profile Democrat for his 2013 reelection campaign, a week after court filings showed that two of the governor's former allies had sought to use a business deal with Steve Fulop to gain his support. "I never had any sense - my campaign may have been more optimistic, but I never had any sense that I'd ever get Steve Fulop's endorsement, because it seemed pretty clear to me that Steve Fulop was intent on running for governor after I left," Christie, a Republican, said at a Statehouse news conference.
NEWS
August 17, 2016
Southside Johnny and the Asbury Jukes made waves in 1977 with their hit record, "This Time It's For Real. " Superintendent William H. Hite Jr. may be humming a similar tune when Philadelphia schools open in three weeks. He's much more certain that the district won't have to beg for another large infusion of cash to make it through the school year. "While we continue to have work to do, the Philadelphia School District begins the 2016-17 school year more optimistic than we have been in years as we work toward our goal of great schools close to where children live," Hite told the Inquirer Editorial Board.
SPORTS
August 17, 2016 | By Zach Berman, STAFF WRITER
Carson Wentz might not be practicing because of a hairline fracture in his ribs, but offensive coordinator Frank Reich said that won't halt Wentz's development this summer. "It's still easy for him to grow," Reich said. "You can get the mental reps. You can still get a lot of film study and still be interacting with the players. Maybe even to more of an extent, interacting with the receivers, and talking about what you expect as a quarterback. And we certainly expect no slowing down the process as far as growing mentally.
SPORTS
August 15, 2016 | By Zach Berman, STAFF WRITER
Lane Johnson said he purchased basic amino acids online, checked the ingredients with a smartphone application offered by the NFL Players' Association, and believed it was an approved supplement. Drug tests indicated otherwise, and the Eagles tackle is expecting to be levied a 10-game suspension for a second violation of the league's performance-enhancing drug policy. His ire is directed at the NFLPA. "Every supplement I've taken has been approved by the Aegis Shield app, which the NFLPA gives us," Johnson said.
SPORTS
August 15, 2016 | By Matt Gelb, STAFF WRITER
The Phillies have 43 players on their 40-man roster - two on the 60-day disabled list and one suspended - and all but three have appeared in the majors at some point in their careers. A new front office billed this season as a chance to evaluate the talent it inherited before making the next wave of decisions in the rebuilding process. That phase is almost near. The overturn on the 40-man roster, starting in a few weeks when rosters are expanded for September, will be immense.
SPORTS
August 12, 2016 | By Marc Narducci, STAFF WRITER
To nobody's surprise, the Union's highly anticipated new addition, U.S. national team midfielder Alejandro Bedoya, will be in the lineup when they visit the New England Revolution on Saturday for a key Major League Soccer game. Bedoya, who has played his entire career in Europe, most recently with Nantes in France, was acquired from the Chicago Fire last week in the allocation process. He attended Saturday's 2-2 draw at D.C United, but didn't suit up. Now with a week to train with his new team, coach Jim Curtin is looking forward to seeing Bedoya's MLS debut.
SPORTS
August 10, 2016
IMAGINATION and reality may have never battled each other more in the Philadelphia sports landscape than it has over the past couple of seasons when it comes to the 76ers. The battle continues as the start of training camp at the end of September draws near. As the days pass until then and no word leaks of injury, the imagination grows of what may be this season, one year after the Sixers posted only 10 wins. The most common question I get asked from fans is this: How many wins will they get this season?
NEWS
August 7, 2016
A decision on whether the Criminal Justice Center will be open Monday for court business will be announced by court officials on Sunday. The center has been closed since Thursday, after a structural failure involving two elevators injured two employees. Sgt. Paul Owens, a 29-year sheriff's deputy who was in one of the elevators and was injured in the mishap, remained in critical condition Friday at Hahnemann University Hospital, said Hahnemann spokesman Phil Ellingsworth Jr. The official cause of the incident has not been determined.
SPORTS
August 2, 2016 | By Bob Brookover, Inquirer Columnist
If you did not know any better, the scene at Lincoln Financial Field would have looked pretty awesome Sunday. The thick early-morning storm clouds gave way to bright sunshine and the Eagles' fight song blared over the sound system as the team opened its first public practice of the Doug Pederson era. "It was pretty cool," rookie quarterback Carson Wentz declared after his first workout on his new home field. "Coming out here, everyone's yelling. For a practice, it's pretty sweet to see the support and see everyone out here.
BUSINESS
August 1, 2016 | By Diane Mastrull, Staff Writer
The location is North Philadelphia, far from the cutting-edge labs of some of the city's edgiest start-ups inhabiting the University City Science Center, or the suburbs' pharmaceutical companies along the Route 202 corridor. But it's home to a fast-growing, innovative manufacturer offering solutions to the health-care industry and job opportunities to veterans and others whose backgrounds make it hard to find work. DiSorb Systems Inc. is a veteran- owned company of 18 employees at 18th Street and West Indiana Avenue that makes products that solidify and disinfect blood and other liquid medical waste for safe and cost-effective disposal by hospitals and surgical centers.
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