CollectionsExpectancy
IN THE NEWS

Expectancy

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
April 7, 2016
By Thomas Farley The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation recently released a map showing shocking differences in health between the rich and the poor in Philadelphia. The map shows that life expectancy at birth in Strawberry Mansion is only 68 years, 20 years shorter than just a few miles away in Society Hill. This 20-year gap isn't right, and it isn't something that we should accept. What's behind these numbers? The biggest killers in Philadelphia are chronic illnesses like heart disease, cancer, and diabetes.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 2011
I'VE ALWAYS ASSUMED that women live longer than men, which is why I joke with female friends scattered across the country that we'll all meet up in nursing homes when we're little old ladies. We tell each other that we're going to stick together and that one day we'll be taking bus trips to New York and to Atlantic City. But now here comes new info saying that American women in many areas of the United States die at earlier ages than they did even a generation ago. And two of the leading reasons for why this is are things women can do something about: obesity and smoking.
NEWS
May 15, 2011
Retirement planning is no small task. Ideally, you start it in your 20s - though not everyone has the forethought. For the rest of us, these sites provide some direction. Social Security may have an uncertain future, but for now the retirement planner at the Social Security Online site is not a bad place to start investigating the steps to take to prepare for old age. Links go to instructions for applying for benefits and tell when to do so. An eerie life-expectancy calculator will tell you, statistically, how much longer you can expect to live.
NEWS
March 24, 1986 | BY THE ECONOMIST
Winter visitors to Moscow can only admire the healthy determination of the heads bobbing up and down in the steam that rises from the open-air swimming pool down by the Moskva River, not far from the Kremlin. Like every country, Russia has its health freaks. Yet even to the untrained eye, it looks a far from healthy place to live. The diet is poor by Western standards. So is public hygiene (only the foolhardy or the desperate could brave the foul odors and primitive equipment of the public lavatories)
NEWS
December 8, 2002 | By Robert F. O'Neill INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
"We have met the enemy and he is us," declared Pogo years ago in the funny pages. The late Walt Kelly's comic-strip character might well have been referring to older adults who know the path to a longer and healthier life but don't take it. That was the message delivered by Robert Cox, senior investigator at the Lankenau Institute for Medical Research, during a seminar at the Kaiserman Jewish Community Center in Wynnewood. Cox, 65, conducts research related to cardiovascular disease at the Lankenau Institute, on the grounds of Lankenau Hospital, also in Wynnewood.
NEWS
January 19, 1994 | By Thomas J. Brady, with reports from Inquirer wire services
THE SUN ALSO RISES OVER LA RUE ERNEST HEMINGWAY Ernest Hemingway didn't really need a street named after him to immortalize his love affair with Paris, but city officials went ahead and did it anyway. La Rue Ernest Hemingway will be a new street in a redevelopment area of southwestern Paris along the Seine River, a city spokeswoman said. The block-long street will connect Rue Leblanc and Boulevard du General Martial Valin and will border the new Georges Pompidou Hospital.
NEWS
February 21, 2005 | By Mark McDonald INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
A 90-pound chunk of masonry breaks off the facade of a high-rise building and crushes a man on the sidewalk below. Another man, stumbling home from a late-night party, falls in the street, passes out, and freezes to death. Two men break into a railroad yard and die after drinking several quarts of industrial solvent from a tanker car. There are so many odd and horrible ways to die in Russia that it's almost no surprise the average Russian man isn't expected to see his 59th birthday.
NEWS
December 13, 1986 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
The Golden Child whisks Eddie Murphy from Beverly Hills to the foothills of the Himalayas. The move may expand his horizons, but it severely limits Murphy and mutes his usually riotous brand of comedy. After Beverly Hills Cop became a box-office phenomenon in 1984, there was much speculation in Hollywood about what Murphy would do for an encore - other than the inevitable Beverly Hills Cop II. The Golden Child represents a curious choice: a hybrid of the more familiar Murphy humor and a tongue-in- cheek Spielbergian adventure replete with special effects from George Lucas.
NEWS
October 15, 1990 | BY JILL PORTER
Most of us already know that too much of a good thing can be bad for you. But now we find out that too little of a bad thing can be bad for you, too. Cholesterol, to be exact. According to a study published last week, lowering cholesterol reduces your chance of dying from heart disease, which most of us already know. But lowering cholesterol also increases your chance of committing suicide, being murdered or otherwise dying violently or accidentally. I'm not making this up. According to a University of Pittsburgh researcher, for every 100,000 people who cut their cholesterol, there are 28 fewer heart-related deaths - but there are 29 more deaths from suicide, homicide and accidents.
REAL_ESTATE
June 30, 1991 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tony Vizzi rarely gives no for an answer. Especially if the question is "Can you restore my old roof?" "Old roofs can be repaired," the Pottstown roofer insists. "A contractor who says the materials are no longer available is either uninformed or giving you false information. " Eleven years ago, Vizzi was a carpenter, building kitchen cabinets and counter tops. He took a job with friend, who, as a marketing tool, was repairing slate roofs. No one else was. "It was a highly skilled craft, which I liked.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 16, 2016 | By Valerie Russ, Staff Writer
THOUSANDS of people are expected to take part in the PRO-ACT Philadelphia Recovery Walk on Saturday at Penn's Landing. Now in its 15th year, the event is aimed at demonstrating that people can and do recover from addiction, said PRO-ACT executive director Beverly Haberle. "We aim to show those who are active in their addiction that recovery is attainable and thriving in recovery is possible," she said. Haberle said that 25,000 people in the five-county Philadelphia metropolitan area took part in the walk last year.
SPORTS
September 11, 2016 | By Joe Juliano, STAFF WRITER
PITTSBURGH - Coaches say they like to maintain a routine while preparing for every football game and not deviate from the norm, but that doesn't seem to have been the case this week as Penn State and Pittsburgh prepared for the renewal of their intrastate rivalry. By the time the highly anticipated game kicks off Saturday at Heinz Field, the staffs of head coaches James Franklin and Pat Narduzzi will have seen just about every formation and play ever called in the careers of first-year offensive coordinators Joe Moorhead of the Nittany Lions and Matt Canada of the Panthers.
SPORTS
September 9, 2016 | By Sam Donnellon, DAILY NEWS COLUMNIST
WHEN 40-YEAR-OLD Andy Reid tabbed 58-year-old Jim Johnson to be his first defensive coordinator in 1999, the move seemed fraught with risk. Johnson had already been around the block a few times, had been a head coach for several colleges, and had been an NFL and USFL assistant in a few places, as well. There was a fear, very real at the time, that Johnson's résumé alone could intimidate the young head coach, or undermine him. Who would win if the older, more experienced man became insistent?
SPORTS
September 9, 2016 | By Marcus Hayes, STAFF WRITER
How did we reach this startling point? How did the Eagles suddenly find themselves flush with wide receiver talent? Just four months ago the Birds were hoping to prove the NFL wrong about Rueben Randle and Chris Givens. On Saturday, they still lacked a No. 1 receiver, but that's OK. They shed Randle and Givens because they knew first-round holdover Nelson Agholor and newcomer Dorial Green-Beckham would be on the front line with slot ace Jordan Matthews, and that Josh Huff (!)
SPORTS
September 7, 2016 | By Zach Berman, STAFF WRITER
The Eagles enter Week 1 of the regular season with Lane Johnson on the roster, and coach Doug Pederson expects Johnson to start at right tackle Sunday against the Cleveland Browns. Johnson has been waiting for word from the NFL on an expected 10-game suspension for a second violation of the league's performance-enhancing drug policy. "Right now, until I hear something further, Lane is my right tackle," Pederson said. Johnson said he does not know what is taking so long. The wait has been agonizing, but the tackle now gets to block for Carson Wentz.
SPORTS
September 2, 2016 | By Mike Kern, Staff Writer
PERCEPTIONS can be whatever you want them to be, although in reality they mean little. Yet they can still shape opinions, in any number of directions. Temple's football team tied a program record by winning 10 games last season, its third with Matt Rhule as the coach. The Owls started 7-0 for the first time ever and were ranked as high as 20th, the first time they'd been in the poll since 1979. And they beat Penn State for the first time in 74 years. Senior linebacker Tyler Matakevich, who had received no other FBS scholarship offers, won a bunch of national awards.
SPORTS
August 31, 2016 | By Mike Kern, STAFF WRITER
A YEAR AGO, Penn's football team was coming off a 2-8 season, had a new coach for the first time since 1992 in longtime assistant Ray Priore, and had been picked to finish sixth in the Ivy League, its lowest projection in 24 seasons. Then the Quakers started out 1-3, which included a win at Villanova, ranked fifth in FCS. Sandwiching that were 21-point losses at Lehigh and at home to Dartmouth. Then, a program that had dropped 15 of its last 18 proceeded to finish the season with six straight wins to end in a three-way tie for the title, its first since 2012.
SPORTS
August 31, 2016
In any season, there are going to be surprises, both ways. So why should the Phillies' 2016 ride be an exception? Since there weren't any expectations to begin with, I try to focus on the good ones. Which means you hope that Aaron Nola's troubles after a promising start are mostly a blip on the old radar screen moving forward. But it's a funny thing with top prospects. Some turn out to be Maikel Franco, while others become Domonic Brown. This year, who figured that Jeanmar Gomez was going to be in the mid-30s in saves with a month to go?
NEWS
August 18, 2016 | By Andrew Seidman, TRENTON BUREAU
TRENTON - Gov. Christie said Tuesday that he had not expected to win the endorsement of a high-profile Democrat for his 2013 reelection campaign, a week after court filings showed that two of the governor's former allies had sought to use a business deal with Steve Fulop to gain his support. "I never had any sense - my campaign may have been more optimistic, but I never had any sense that I'd ever get Steve Fulop's endorsement, because it seemed pretty clear to me that Steve Fulop was intent on running for governor after I left," Christie, a Republican, said at a Statehouse news conference.
SPORTS
August 17, 2016 | By Zach Berman, STAFF WRITER
Carson Wentz might not be practicing because of a hairline fracture in his ribs, but offensive coordinator Frank Reich said that won't halt Wentz's development this summer. "It's still easy for him to grow," Reich said. "You can get the mental reps. You can still get a lot of film study and still be interacting with the players. Maybe even to more of an extent, interacting with the receivers, and talking about what you expect as a quarterback. And we certainly expect no slowing down the process as far as growing mentally.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|