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Expense Accounts

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NEWS
May 29, 1993 | By Russell E. Eshleman Jr., INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
For lawmakers, the fun part of doling out $15 billion at budget time is rewarding friends and favorite programs. Perhaps even more fun is obtained by punishing enemies. As evidence, take a look at the expense accounts for members of Commonwealth and Superior Courts. While the seven members of the Supreme Court saw the pot of money from which they draw their unvouchered expenses boosted, from $172,000 to $180,000, judges on the other appellate courts did not fare so well. Their accounts were halved.
NEWS
May 24, 1988
A thorough audit of the Delaware River Port Authority should be undertaken in light of a U.S. District Court judge's conclusion that it is an "agency run amok. " Judge Stanley S. Brotman made the observation after presiding over a sex- discrimination trial last month that involved a former DRPA employee fired for falsifying expense vouchers. The judge is not the first to raise questions about poor management and serious improprieties, if not corrupt practices, at the bistate agency that oversees the bridges between Philadelphia and New Jersey, runs the PATCO high-speed line and does international marketing for the Delaware River ports.
BUSINESS
August 26, 1988 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
A federal judge yesterday criticized the Delaware River Port Authority for "ineptitude and lethargy" in efforts to curb padding of expense accounts by employees, but the judge ruled that the agency had not erred in firing an employee who padded her expense account. Loretta Dadino, who had been director of port promotions, filed a sex- discrimination suit against the DRPA in January 1985. Dadino said the DRPA discriminated against her when it fired her in 1982 after she admitted padding her expense accounts, while male managers who did the same kept their jobs.
NEWS
January 18, 1986
Pennsylvanians have no way of knowing how members of the state House of Representatives spend their taxpayer-financed expense accounts. Why? Majority Leader James J. Manderino (D., Westmoreland) says he doesn't want his colleagues subjected to public criticism if they choose a steak instead of pot roast while they're dining out on the taxpayer. The news media, he says, would love to sink their teeth into a story like that. "The only reason (expense) records are sought are for derogatory purposes," Mr. Manderino asserted.
NEWS
March 1, 2012
MAYBE WE shouldn't be too hard on Sheriff Jewell Williams for wanting a fancier vehicle than the 2012 SUV he inherited from outgoing Acting Sheriff Barbara Deeley. Last week, the Daily News reported that Williams had requested from the city a souped-up pursuit vehicle that costs $38,000; the city turned down this request, and a request for $3,000 worth of decals printed with his name to adorn the doors of 54 sheriff vehicles. After all, considering where former State Rep. Williams spent the last 10-plus years, he's a product of the culture of perks and entitlements for which our General Assembly sets the gold standard.
BUSINESS
January 25, 1994 | by Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
Joseph Rauscher and Tom Logan, ousted last year as president and vice president, respectively, of Local 6 of the Bakery, Confectionary and Tobacco Workers Union, want some sweet revenge - about $20 million worth. They say they were libeled when BCTW's leaders charged them last September with padding their expense accounts and other financial finagling and appointed a trustee to take over Local 6. Rauscher is chairman of the Philadelphia Council of the AFL-CIO. This dispute does not affect that post.
BUSINESS
May 16, 1988 | By James Asher and Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writers
A U.S. District Court judge in Camden has sharply criticized the Delaware River Port Authority for being an "agency run amok. " Judge Stanley S. Brotman, who presided over a sex-discrimination trial last month involving a former DRPA employee fired for falsifying expense vouchers, expressed concern about mismanagement at the authority during a private meeting with DRPA attorney Hersh Kozlov and board member Barbara G. Jones, who is also a...
NEWS
August 14, 2005
Ten years ago, a pay raise for Harrisburg lawmakers triggered a brief wave of protest, but made hardly a ripple at the polls when the next election rolled around. Might it be different this time? The public outcry over the outlandish pay hike lawmakers sneaked through in the dark of night on July 7 shows no signs of abating. Yes, the 2006 primaries are nine months away - but the taxpayer furor already has outlasted the predictions of political insiders. (You can bet the pols counted on voters having short memories.
NEWS
November 22, 2012 | By Paul Nussbaum, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Delaware River Port Authority board today approved reform measures designed to make the agency more accountable and efficient. The latest steps, including an open-records policy and tighter rules on employee expense accounts, are part of a continuing move to make changes requested more than two years ago by the governors of Pennsylvania and New Jersey. A final flurry of changes, including an ethics policy and rules on political contributions by contractors, are expected next month to implement the rest of the governors' reforms.
NEWS
November 22, 2012 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
For the second time in as many months, the Delaware River Port Authority board has approved reform measures designed to make the agency more accountable and efficient. The latest steps, including an open-records policy and tighter rules on employee expense accounts, were approved Wednesday and are part of a continuing move to make changes requested more than two years ago by the governors of Pennsylvania and New Jersey. The board approved eight changes in October. A final flurry of changes, including an ethics policy and rules on political contributions by contractors, are expected next month to complete the rest of the governors' requests.
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NEWS
January 14, 2013
With the Pennsylvania Turnpike Commission's long-held reputation as a patronage haven, it comes as little surprise that top turnpike officials enjoy liberal expense accounts. Nor that hundreds of turnpike employees are allowed to cruise the toll road for free, even on personal trips. Even so, a just-released review by state Auditor General Jack Wagner should prompt needed reforms, especially at a time when other state and local government agencies are having to trim spending. In a 93-page audit covering a nearly five-year period, Wagner blasted what he called "overly generous and permissive" perks for the turnpike's five governing commissioners.
NEWS
November 22, 2012 | By Paul Nussbaum, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Delaware River Port Authority board today approved reform measures designed to make the agency more accountable and efficient. The latest steps, including an open-records policy and tighter rules on employee expense accounts, are part of a continuing move to make changes requested more than two years ago by the governors of Pennsylvania and New Jersey. A final flurry of changes, including an ethics policy and rules on political contributions by contractors, are expected next month to implement the rest of the governors' reforms.
NEWS
November 22, 2012 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
For the second time in as many months, the Delaware River Port Authority board has approved reform measures designed to make the agency more accountable and efficient. The latest steps, including an open-records policy and tighter rules on employee expense accounts, were approved Wednesday and are part of a continuing move to make changes requested more than two years ago by the governors of Pennsylvania and New Jersey. The board approved eight changes in October. A final flurry of changes, including an ethics policy and rules on political contributions by contractors, are expected next month to complete the rest of the governors' requests.
NEWS
March 1, 2012
MAYBE WE shouldn't be too hard on Sheriff Jewell Williams for wanting a fancier vehicle than the 2012 SUV he inherited from outgoing Acting Sheriff Barbara Deeley. Last week, the Daily News reported that Williams had requested from the city a souped-up pursuit vehicle that costs $38,000; the city turned down this request, and a request for $3,000 worth of decals printed with his name to adorn the doors of 54 sheriff vehicles. After all, considering where former State Rep. Williams spent the last 10-plus years, he's a product of the culture of perks and entitlements for which our General Assembly sets the gold standard.
NEWS
August 14, 2005
Ten years ago, a pay raise for Harrisburg lawmakers triggered a brief wave of protest, but made hardly a ripple at the polls when the next election rolled around. Might it be different this time? The public outcry over the outlandish pay hike lawmakers sneaked through in the dark of night on July 7 shows no signs of abating. Yes, the 2006 primaries are nine months away - but the taxpayer furor already has outlasted the predictions of political insiders. (You can bet the pols counted on voters having short memories.
NEWS
July 8, 2005 | By Mario F. Cattabiani INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Without a word of debate, in the wee hours of the morning yesterday, state legislators voted themselves a double-digit pay increase before hurriedly leaving the Capitol for their 10-week summer recess. "We deserve it," Rep. Frank Oliver (D., Phila.) said as he walked out the House chamber at 2 a.m. moments after the body voted, 119-79, for the raise. "See what time we are getting out right now. We work long hours sometimes. " Minutes later, the Senate voted, 27-23, for the bill, which would increase the pay for back-benchers by 16 percent, with leaders getting much more.
NEWS
February 11, 2001 | By Angela Couloumbis, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A consultant to Camden's troubled Parking Authority paid for a $6,000 golf trip to Arizona that he took with the authority's executive director and former Mayor Milton Milan, according to travel documents The Inquirer has obtained. In January 1999, Elvis Gooden, the authority's financial consultant; Anthony Scarduzio, the authority's executive director; and Milan spent five days and four nights at the Dobson Ranch Inn & Resort in Mesa, Ariz., golfing and riding desert bikes, travel documents show.
NEWS
March 2, 1997 | By Christian Davenport, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
After starting her first year on the Board of Commissioners last year, Carolyn Parker said she needed to set up a home office to help her do the job. She was reimbursed by taxpayers for a fax machine, a printer, a portable phone, an answering machine, and a file cabinet, among other items, through her township expense account. Parker's was the highest total expense reimbursement last year for a commissioner in Haverford, the only municipality in Delaware County that offers such an account.
NEWS
March 14, 1995 | By Nancy Lawson, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Board of Commissioners President Fred Moran said last night that he had asked Township Manager Tom Bannar to "draw up some new procedures" on commissioners' expenses. Moran was the only commissioner to address the questions of Ellen Fisher, who was responding to an Inquirer article Sunday that detailed how some commissioners had spent their "expense account" money the last two years on dinners, baby sitters, newsletters, and contributions to charities - often without providing receipts.
SPORTS
March 3, 1995 | By Jayson Stark, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was a monumental baseball event that just had to happen: the first replacement-player trade in history. And a blockbuster of a trade it was, too. The Cleveland Replacement Indians announced yesterday morning that they had traded two players to the Cincinnati Replace-Reds. In return for . . . Absolutely nobody. "Hey, sometimes those kinds of deals are good," Replace-Reds manager Davey Johnson deadpanned when asked about this stunning two-for-none swap. "They call it, 'Addition by subtraction.
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