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Expense Ratio

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BUSINESS
October 7, 2012 | By Mark Jewell, Associated Press
BOSTON - Index mutual fund investors are a cost-conscious bunch. Rather than seek out managers with a good shot at beating the market, they parse tiny differences in fund expenses. Index funds are cheaper because no one is being paid to pick stocks. Every cent that doesn't end up in someone else's pocket counts, the thinking goes. If that's your mindset, you'll want to pay attention to an aspect of index fund expenses that's drawing greater scrutiny: fees that fund companies pay to license benchmark indexes.
NEWS
June 14, 2011
Vanguard Group said today it started an actively managed stock mutual fund that will invest in emerging markets. The Emerging Markets Select Stock Fund will use four investment advisory firms and have an expense ratio of 0.95 percent ($9.50 per $1,000 invested) compared with an average of 1.68 percent for similar emerging market funds, the Malvern company said. The fund's two-week subscription period for investments will end on June 27.    -Paul Schweizer
BUSINESS
January 6, 2015 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
Hackers make good headlines, but they may not make for good investments. After Sony's network was hacked recently, a new exchange-traded fund, PureFunds ISE Cyber Security ETF (symbol: HACK), saw its shares start to rise. The fund only launched in November and has traded from about $25 a share to $28 in recent days. Funds like this capitalize on headlines about volatile sectors of the stock market. Like episodes of Law & Order , they have a ripped-from-the-headlines pitch that investors find intriguing.
BUSINESS
January 24, 2004 | By Todd Mason INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Hidden costs of owning the 30 largest retail mutual funds would increase their published expenses by an average of 43 percent, a study released yesterday by shareholder advocates said. The study, conducted by Wake Forest University and University of Florida professors, measured the impact of the funds' brokerage commissions and related costs in 2001 as they bought and sold securities on behalf of their investors. Trading costs are not part of the fees and expenses that funds must disclose prominently as their "expense ratio.
BUSINESS
April 26, 1998 | By Heike Wipperfurth, FOR THE INQUIRER
A college professor from King of Prussia is wondering what to do with $10,000 she has available for investing. She is thinking about Europe. No, she doesn't want to visit the beaches of Saint Tropez or the cafes of the Piazza San Marco in Venice. Instead, she's thinking about diversifying her investment portfolio by putting money into European stocks. That's because European stock markets are booming. For the first quarter of 1998, the main stock-market index in Portugal was up 46 percent, while Spain rose 41 percent; Italy, 40 percent; and Germany, 21 percent.
BUSINESS
October 24, 2000 | By Miriam Hill, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Credit cards aren't the only financial product offering tricky teaser rates to consumers these days. Mutual funds are playing the game, too, pitching low expenses that may increase later. A host of fund families from big to small have tried this tactic lately: TIAA-CREF, Turner Investment Partners in Berwyn, and Dresdner RCM Global Investors, to name a few. The practice, in which a fund company picks up a portion of expenses, occurs in about 46 percent of mutual funds, including equity, bond and money-market funds, according to fund-tracker Lipper Inc. What's wrong with a company paying a portion of a fund's expenses?
BUSINESS
February 28, 2012 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
An improving global economy has prompted a rise in the price of energy, especially in oil, which rose again to more than $100 a barrel last week and could head higher. If you want to energize your portfolio, here are ways to take advantage of this trend. For investors looking for exposure to global commodities and energy, there are plenty of low-cost exchange-traded funds. A new paper by SEI, the local fund giant, shows that assets in ETFs continue to grow, reaching $1.06 trillion in 2011.
BUSINESS
March 22, 2004 | By Todd Mason INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
John Bogle's Vanguard Group is a low-cost, squeaky-clean provider of basic investments. Retired now, "St. Jack" draws crowds - and money to the mutual fund company - even though he turned over control to John Brennan in 1996. Brennan's Vanguard is remaking itself as a one-stop financial supermarket while continuing to wring out costs. A person with $10,000 invested at Vanguard, for example, paid an average of $25 in expenses to the company last year. But the Malvern company is stumbling under the burden.
BUSINESS
November 28, 2005 | By Todd Mason INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
David-and-Goliath stories are rare in the world of municipal-bond mutual funds. The big funds have cost advantages that allow them to serve up bigger slices of munis' modest tax-exempt interest income. Though Davids are rare, they are not unknown. David W. Baldt, a Philadelphia fund manager, demonstrates that the little guys, perhaps even do-it-yourselfers, can prevail. Morningstar Inc. named Baldt its bond fund manager of the year in 1997 for his work at what is now Deutsche Asset Management Inc. He continues to outperform after jumping to Schroder Investment Management North America Inc. in 2003.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
January 6, 2015 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
Hackers make good headlines, but they may not make for good investments. After Sony's network was hacked recently, a new exchange-traded fund, PureFunds ISE Cyber Security ETF (symbol: HACK), saw its shares start to rise. The fund only launched in November and has traded from about $25 a share to $28 in recent days. Funds like this capitalize on headlines about volatile sectors of the stock market. Like episodes of Law & Order , they have a ripped-from-the-headlines pitch that investors find intriguing.
BUSINESS
October 7, 2012 | By Mark Jewell, Associated Press
BOSTON - Index mutual fund investors are a cost-conscious bunch. Rather than seek out managers with a good shot at beating the market, they parse tiny differences in fund expenses. Index funds are cheaper because no one is being paid to pick stocks. Every cent that doesn't end up in someone else's pocket counts, the thinking goes. If that's your mindset, you'll want to pay attention to an aspect of index fund expenses that's drawing greater scrutiny: fees that fund companies pay to license benchmark indexes.
BUSINESS
February 28, 2012 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
An improving global economy has prompted a rise in the price of energy, especially in oil, which rose again to more than $100 a barrel last week and could head higher. If you want to energize your portfolio, here are ways to take advantage of this trend. For investors looking for exposure to global commodities and energy, there are plenty of low-cost exchange-traded funds. A new paper by SEI, the local fund giant, shows that assets in ETFs continue to grow, reaching $1.06 trillion in 2011.
NEWS
June 14, 2011
Vanguard Group said today it started an actively managed stock mutual fund that will invest in emerging markets. The Emerging Markets Select Stock Fund will use four investment advisory firms and have an expense ratio of 0.95 percent ($9.50 per $1,000 invested) compared with an average of 1.68 percent for similar emerging market funds, the Malvern company said. The fund's two-week subscription period for investments will end on June 27.    -Paul Schweizer
BUSINESS
November 28, 2005 | By Todd Mason INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
David-and-Goliath stories are rare in the world of municipal-bond mutual funds. The big funds have cost advantages that allow them to serve up bigger slices of munis' modest tax-exempt interest income. Though Davids are rare, they are not unknown. David W. Baldt, a Philadelphia fund manager, demonstrates that the little guys, perhaps even do-it-yourselfers, can prevail. Morningstar Inc. named Baldt its bond fund manager of the year in 1997 for his work at what is now Deutsche Asset Management Inc. He continues to outperform after jumping to Schroder Investment Management North America Inc. in 2003.
BUSINESS
March 22, 2004 | By Todd Mason INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
John Bogle's Vanguard Group is a low-cost, squeaky-clean provider of basic investments. Retired now, "St. Jack" draws crowds - and money to the mutual fund company - even though he turned over control to John Brennan in 1996. Brennan's Vanguard is remaking itself as a one-stop financial supermarket while continuing to wring out costs. A person with $10,000 invested at Vanguard, for example, paid an average of $25 in expenses to the company last year. But the Malvern company is stumbling under the burden.
BUSINESS
January 24, 2004 | By Todd Mason INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Hidden costs of owning the 30 largest retail mutual funds would increase their published expenses by an average of 43 percent, a study released yesterday by shareholder advocates said. The study, conducted by Wake Forest University and University of Florida professors, measured the impact of the funds' brokerage commissions and related costs in 2001 as they bought and sold securities on behalf of their investors. Trading costs are not part of the fees and expenses that funds must disclose prominently as their "expense ratio.
BUSINESS
October 24, 2000 | By Miriam Hill, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Credit cards aren't the only financial product offering tricky teaser rates to consumers these days. Mutual funds are playing the game, too, pitching low expenses that may increase later. A host of fund families from big to small have tried this tactic lately: TIAA-CREF, Turner Investment Partners in Berwyn, and Dresdner RCM Global Investors, to name a few. The practice, in which a fund company picks up a portion of expenses, occurs in about 46 percent of mutual funds, including equity, bond and money-market funds, according to fund-tracker Lipper Inc. What's wrong with a company paying a portion of a fund's expenses?
BUSINESS
April 26, 1998 | By Heike Wipperfurth, FOR THE INQUIRER
A college professor from King of Prussia is wondering what to do with $10,000 she has available for investing. She is thinking about Europe. No, she doesn't want to visit the beaches of Saint Tropez or the cafes of the Piazza San Marco in Venice. Instead, she's thinking about diversifying her investment portfolio by putting money into European stocks. That's because European stock markets are booming. For the first quarter of 1998, the main stock-market index in Portugal was up 46 percent, while Spain rose 41 percent; Italy, 40 percent; and Germany, 21 percent.
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