CollectionsExpert Witness
IN THE NEWS

Expert Witness

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
March 28, 1993 | By Aaron Epstein, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
If needed, there are "experts" willing to testify in court that the trauma of auto accidents can cause cancer. Or that hazardous chemicals can cause AIDS. Or that spermicidal jelly can cause birth defects. And there are just as many critics who dismiss the above as "junk science" - theories with no support in scientific fact and no place in the courtroom. Now the critics want the Supreme Court to give judges the power to clear all federal courtrooms of scientific testimony outside the mainstream.
NEWS
October 17, 2013 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Robert P. Wolf, 66, of Cherry Hill, executive director from 1975 to 1994 of the Abilities Center of Southern New Jersey in Westville, died Monday, Oct. 14, of pancreatic cancer at his home. The center helps people with disabilities get jobs by, for instance, working with employers to help them understand the applicants' needs, the firm's website says. Dr. Wolf also was an expert witness in cases such as personal injury or medical malpractice for 30 years, his daughter Melissa Rand said.
NEWS
March 21, 1995 | BY DAVE BARRY
TRANSCRIPT, TRIAL OF THE CENTURY, DAY 257 BAILIFF: Hear ye, hear ye, the court is now in sess . . . DEFENSE: Objection, your honor. JUDGE: To what? DEFENSE: Nothing, your honor. We're just warming up. PROSECUTION: Your honor, the people would like to state that we also have no objections at this time. DEFENSE: Objection, your honor. Every time the defense says something, the prosecution always feels it has to say something. PROSECUTION: The people do not. DEFENSE: Do too. PROSECUTION: Do not. DEFENDANT: OK, stop, I confess!
NEWS
March 29, 2000 | by Jim Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
The city paid more than $3 million in the 1990s to settle sexual harassment lawsuits filed by female prison guards against former prison commissioner J. Patrick Gallagher, who denied any wrongdoing. The women who sued insisted that Gallagher had used his power as prison boss to force them to have sex with him, and the city paid them rather than fight the allegations in court. An ex-New York City cop with a doctoral degree, Gallagher is now hiring himself out to help others sue the city - for alleged police abuses.
NEWS
February 8, 2015 | By Ben Finley, Inquirer Staff Writer
Going by her resumé, Sue Cornbluth knows child abuse. She has a doctorate in psychology and claims to be a "nationally recognized mental health expert. " She teaches at Temple University and has appeared on television to discuss traumas such as the Jerry Sandusky scandal. But Cornbluth lacks a state license. And now she is accused of perjury for allegedly lying about it. The felony charge, filed last week in Bucks County, states that Cornbluth claimed to have a license when she served as an expert witness in a 2013 custody battle.
NEWS
March 22, 1987 | By David M. Giles, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Lower Gwynedd Zoning Hearing Board at a recent hearing continued to wrestle with a developer's plans to build a shopping center along Bethlehem Pike. At Wednesday's hearing, the third on a proposal by Altman Properties Inc. to develop the 8.6-acre tract, township solicitor Stephen Yusem questioned the credibility of Altman expert witness Joel Kulick. At the close of last month's hearing, Kulick, a real estate appraiser and licensed broker in Glenside, testified that the value of 2.9 acres of residentially zoned land at the rear of the tract would cost about $136,000 for site and building improvements alone.
SPORTS
June 21, 1989 | By Angelo Cataldi and Glen Macnow, Inquirer Staff Writers
Duke University team physician Frank Bassett did something extraordinary last year. He took the stand and testified against a fellow team doctor. An expert witness for Marc Buoniconti in the player's $6 million negligence suit against The Citadel, Bassett testified that Citadel physician E.K. Wallace had exercised poor judgment in allowing Buoniconti to play with a sprained neck on the day when the middle linebacker was rendered a quadriplegic for life. Buoniconti eventually lost the jury's verdict, but that wasn't the end of the case for Bassett.
NEWS
December 22, 2012 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
Terry L. Musika, 64, a native of Coatesville and an expert on intellectual property damages who qualified for the 1972 Olympic Games in Munich as a sprinter, died of pancreatic cancer Tuesday, Dec. 18, at his home in Hunt Valley, Md. Mr. Musika was a cofounder of Invotex, a Maryland company that specializes in accounting, financial consulting, and intellectual property management services. Mr. Musika was involved in some of the largest patent verdicts and settlements in the country.
NEWS
June 23, 2016 | By Steve Bohnel, STAFF WRITER
It's a trial that has featured an interesting cast of witnesses: strippers, members of a motorcycle club, an FBI special agent. And on Tuesday, in the case of U.S. v. William J. O'Brien III , the latest to testify was a fellow physician. O'Brien, 51, a former Democratic candidate for Bucks County coroner who is serving as his own attorney, is accused of 14 counts of drug and related charges from allegedly running a pill mill with the help of the Pagans Motorcycle Club. Stephen Thomas, a physician who is an expert witness for the prosecution, contended that on numerous occasions O'Brien prescribed painkillers without enough medical examination, and often gave patients dosages that were too high.
NEWS
August 26, 2010 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Marilyn Auerbach Lashner, 80, of Center City, a media analyst and expert witness at trials involving First Amendment rights, died of cancer Tuesday, Aug. 24, at her home. In 1979, Dr. Lashner earned a doctorate in communications from Temple University. Five years later her dissertation, The Chilling Effect in TV News: Intimidation by the Nixon White House , was published as a book. For the dissertation, she compiled statements or actions by the Nixon administration that could have been interpreted as threats to the press, including Nixon's protest at a 1973 news conference of "outrageous, vicious, distorted reporting.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 23, 2016 | By Steve Bohnel, Staff Writer
IT'S A TRIAL that has featured an interesting cast of witnesses: strippers, members of a motorcycle club, an FBI special agent. And on Tuesday, in the case of U.S. v. William J. O'Brien III , the latest to testify was a fellow physician. O'Brien, 51, a former Democratic candidate for Bucks County coroner who is serving as his own attorney, is accused of 14 counts of drug and related charges from allegedly running a pill mill with the help of the Pagans Motorcycle Club. Stephen Thomas, a physician who is an expert witness for the prosecution, contended that on numerous occasions O'Brien prescribed painkillers without enough medical examination, and often gave patients dosages that were too high.
NEWS
April 6, 2016 | By Jeff Gammage, Staff Writer
The jury deciding if Daniel Dougherty set the fire that killed his two young sons in 1985 concluded its third day of deliberations on Monday - a session in which its questions centered on the key defense witness. The tension of days without a verdict was evident in the courtroom. Dougherty, 56, looked weary on the eleventh day of his retrial. None of the lawyers in the case reported a restful weekend. On Monday morning, the jury sent a note to Common Pleas Court Judge J. Scott O'Keefe, asking if it could have a transcript of the testimony of defense expert John Lentini, head of Scientific Fire Analysis L.L.C.
NEWS
February 21, 2016 | By Laura McCrystal and Bonnie L. Cook, STAFF WRITERS
By concluding that Cardinal Anthony J. Bevilacqua died of natural causes - just before the conspiracy and child-endangerment trial of a former top aide - Dr. Walter I. Hofman put an end to swirling rumors. He once reopened a 20-year file and changed a cause of a baby's death from sudden infant death syndrome to suffocation, leading to the conviction of the child's nanny. On another occasion, he recalled, he showed up for an autopsy on an apparently lifeless body and noticed a moving finger.
NEWS
December 16, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Staff Writer
Jim O'Neill was the go-to guy in his family for anybody with a problem. "You could go to him with any problem and he would always have a solution," said his son, Jim Jr. And it was not hard to imagine that his father would fulfill the same role for the police officers he worked with for 30 years on the force. You can picture Jim as he popped an El Producto in his mouth and leaned back to listen to whatever was on the mind of the troubled one. To say Jim was devoted to his family would be a gross understatement.
NEWS
June 18, 2015 | By Ben Finley, Inquirer Staff Writer
An Ambler woman is to spend one year on probation for claiming in court that she was a licensed psychologist - even though she lacked a state credential - during a child custody battle. Sue Cornbluth, who bills herself as a "nationally recognized mental health expert," pleaded no contest in late May to a misdemeanor charge of false swearing. She was originally charged in February with a count of felony perjury. Cornbluth's attorney, Nino Tinari, said the charge was downgraded because her testimony failed to affect the outcome of the case.
BUSINESS
May 29, 2015 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
State Superior Court handed its second smackdown Wednesday to lawyers seeking to collect a fine of nearly $1 million against Philadelphia-area insurance defense lawyer Nancy Raynor. In a one-paragraph ruling, the court barred Philadelphia lawyers Matthew D'Annunzio and Joseph Messa from collecting the fine while it considers Raynor's appeal of the penalty. Raynor was fined $946,127 in November by Philadelphia Common Pleas Court Judge Paul Panepinto, who accused her of permitting an expert witness to introduce banned testimony in a medical-malpractice trial in 2012.
BUSINESS
March 25, 2015 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
The defense team for lawyer Nancy Raynor, hit with nearly $1 million in sanctions because one of her expert witnesses offered banned testimony in a medical malpractice trial, filed papers Monday arguing that the weight of accumulating evidence was ground for a reversal of the penalty. In a filing with Philadelphia Common Pleas Court Judge Paul Panepinto, Raynor's defense team noted that three people have come forward to testify under oath on Raynor's behalf. They said she had asked the witness not to mention that a woman at the heart of a medical malpractice trial had a long history of smoking.
BUSINESS
March 12, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a sometimes intense hearing, testimony resumed Tuesday in a bid by defense lawyer Nancy Raynor to overturn nearly $1 million in sanctions imposed last Oct. 31 because one of her experts offered banned testimony in a medical-malpractice trial. The witness, a trial technician who had been working for the defense team, said last week that he heard Raynor tell the expert witness, Dr. John Kelly, that Philadelphia Common Pleas Court Judge Paul Panepinto had banned any mention that a woman at the center of the trial was a smoker.
NEWS
February 8, 2015 | By Ben Finley, Inquirer Staff Writer
Going by her resumé, Sue Cornbluth knows child abuse. She has a doctorate in psychology and claims to be a "nationally recognized mental health expert. " She teaches at Temple University and has appeared on television to discuss traumas such as the Jerry Sandusky scandal. But Cornbluth lacks a state license. And now she is accused of perjury for allegedly lying about it. The felony charge, filed last week in Bucks County, states that Cornbluth claimed to have a license when she served as an expert witness in a 2013 custody battle.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|