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Extinction

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NEWS
July 25, 2011 | By Faye Flam, Inquirer Staff Writer
Biologist E.O. Wilson once pondered whether many of our fellow living things were doomed once evolution gave rise to an intelligent, technological creature that also happened to be a rapacious carnivore, fiercely territorial, and prone to short-term thinking. We humans can be so destructive that some scientists believe we've now triggered a mass extinction - one that in several hundred years will rival the asteroid impact that killed the dinosaurs. In some places, a mass extinction is already under way. Haiti, a "hotspot" for plant and animal diversity, may be closest to ecological collapse.
NEWS
August 2, 1986
This regards a brief article of July 22, reporting the possibility of the imminent extinction of 3,900 species of plants and animals that will go unprotected because of limited government funding. The extinction of the Palos Verdes blue butterfly already has occurred. My new atlas shows the location of Palo Verdes Estates on the coast of California below Los Angeles. I envisioned a green meadow with blue butterflies fluttering among the brightly colored flowers. Obviously, that small meadow is now encased in condominium concrete, entombing the butterflies evermore.
NEWS
May 18, 1993 | by Julian Simon and Aaron Wildavsky, From the New York Times
If President Clinton signs the Rio accord to protect rare and endangered species, he will place scientific truth in greater danger than endangered species. A fair reading of the available data suggests a rate of extinction not even one-thousandth as great as doomsayers claim. If the rate were any lower, evolution itself would need to be questioned. The World Wildlife Fund, the main promulgator of alarm about biodiversity and the extinction of species, frames the issue in the starkest terms: "Without firing a shot, we may kill one-fifth of all species of life on this planet in the next 10 years.
NEWS
August 4, 1987 | By Richard Cohen
In June a bird named Orange Band died at Disney World in a blaze of publicity. Newspapers noted the bird's passing and so, too, did the networks. It is fair to say that Orange Band's death got the media attention of a person of accomplishment - not quite a Fred Astaire but, say, a brilliant but moderately successful playwright. The bird was 10 and the last of the dusky seaside sparrows. Why all the attention? The dusky was not among those animals, like cattle, that man depends on for food.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 1988 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, Special to The Inquirer
Beginning today, along with the ring-tailed lemurs and the rhino iguana and others in the Philadelphia Zoo's rare animal house, there sits an unlikely exhibit. It includes crocodile shoes. There are leopard skin coats. You'll find ivory chess pieces. You'll see - believe it! - an elephant's-foot ice bucket. Yes, made from an elephant's foot. "Cargo to Extinction" is designed to raise awareness about the threat to animal populations from the production - and purchase - of such goods.
LIVING
April 13, 1998 | By Marian Uhlman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
New clues about life 65 million years ago make a splash when they are really big - as in dinosaurs. Gerta Keller, a Princeton University geologist and paleontologist, has unlocked information by digging up something really small - as in single-cell animals. Keller has collected millions of the fossilized remains of microscopic animals that inhabited the ancient oceans. They are her time capsule, of sorts, allowing her to make detailed records of the prehistoric marine environment, from temperatures to nutrients.
NEWS
March 30, 2005 | By Seth Borenstein INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
We are using Earth to improve our lives, but our children and grandchildren will live in a worsening environment that endangers their existence, more than 1,300 scientists warn. In a report to be released today, a team of international experts concluded that the world was at risk on many fronts, including a skyrocketing runoff of nutrient-rich farm waste that is killing swaths of the world's oceans, a massive wave of animal and plant extinctions, and a planet that is growing warmer.
NEWS
May 18, 1986 | By Gerald B. Jordan, Inquirer Washington Bureau
A giant flying pterodactyl plunged back into extinction yesterday when it crashed on its first public flight. The 44-pound mechanical replica of Quetzalcoatlus northropi, a species of extinct flying reptile that soared above the Earth about 65 million years ago, had flown successfully 21 times since January. But in its first public appearance, at an Armed Forces Day air show here, the radio-controlled, fur-covered model - with an 18-foot wingspan and a battery-powered heart - toppled out of control as soon as it was released from the glider that towed it to a height of 400 feet.
NEWS
April 26, 2011
By Carlos Martínez Rivera The world's frogs and toads are in the midst of a crisis that has been compared to the fall of the dinosaurs, with more than a third of species in danger of extinction. Many others, such as the beautiful Panamanian golden toad, have already disappeared from the wild. Why should you care? Simply put, frogs matter. Beyond Kermit and their place in our national psyche - and each species' intrinsic value as a unique biological marvel - frogs and toads are important components of many ecosystems.
LIVING
November 29, 1999 | By Mark Jaffe, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In China's open air markets the cost of a single gold-headed box turtle can reach $900. But even at that price, demand for the delicacy is so great, the turtle is being eaten out of existence. The same is true for the Indian tent turtle - which is flown by airplane to Chinese markets - and the Burmese roofed turtle, sold in the food stalls of Myanmar's capital, Rangoon. Across Asia, turtles are in trouble, terrible trouble. But the woes don't end there. California desert tortoises are vulnerable to a boom in recreational off-road vehicles, and leatherback turtles on the Hawaiian coast are threatened by commercial fisherman.
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NEWS
September 23, 2015 | BY THE REV. PATRICK CHESTON
AFRICAN-AMERICANS have a heritage that encompasses a life that relies on nature and God's creatures. Throughout the South, blacks have farmed, hunted, gardened and fished for generations. And even though most African-Americans today live in urban settings, many of us descended from enslaved people in the South and migrated elsewhere. It is this personal connection to God's created world that drives us to protect God's creatures. One tool at our disposal to do this work (beyond prayer)
SPORTS
June 21, 2015 | By Jen A. Miller, For The Inquirer
Oddyssey costume almost made him extinct Brett Klinger wasn't all that happy when he finished the Oddyssey Half Marathon on Sunday. That wasn't just because of the weather. The race was held on a hot and soupy day, and most runners looked like they'd jumped in a pool by the time they got to mile 13. No, a big part of that misery was that Klinger, 30, had decided to participate in the costume contest portion of the Fairmount Park race and his was a rather bulky one that he kept on for the entire event despite a key part coming undone before he reached to mile one. "We both liked Jurassic Park, and realized [Jurassic World]
NEWS
September 10, 2014 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
Here they lie, 43 creatures and plants that are no more. Assembled in cases at the Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University - in a library normally closed to the public - are birds stuffed with cotton, jars holding a snake and a bat, insects pinned to display boards. Most natural history museum specimens are, of course, dead. But the demise of the ones in this new exhibit - "Mortal Remains: Animals That Have Perished from the Face of the Earth in Recent Times" - held greater implications.
NEWS
June 27, 2014 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
IN "TRANSFORMERS: Age of Extinction," Optimus Prime confronts a scoundrel who's part of a dirty deal to set mankind against his robot pals. "The world will know what happened here," he declares. No, it won't. Because all the world has to go by is this movie. Characters appear and disappear without reason or motive; chase scenes conclude ambiguously, like "The Sopranos"; night becomes day becomes night without any relation to time; Texas becomes Chicago, Chicago becomes China - we're just there.
NEWS
September 23, 2013 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
CHERRY HILL The president of Rotary International issued a direct challenge to local members over the weekend: Recruit new people or risk extinction. "I believe in tradition, but sometimes you need change," said Ron Burton, whose group is one of the world's largest humanitarian service organizations. "We've got to take a look at who we are and ask if we want to be relevant or even in existence in the years to come. " Burton spoke at the Rotary Leadership Institute of North America held in Cherry Hill over the weekend.
NEWS
June 5, 2013 | BY CHRIS BRENNAN, Daily News Staff Writer brennac@phillynews.com, 215-854-5973
THE STATE House voted 117-81 yesterday to approve one of two state Senate bills to abolish the controversy-plagued Philadelphia Traffic Court. The second bill is expected to be approved by the House today. The bill passed yesterday would eliminate the court as part of a change to the state constitution. That bill will have to again be approved in the next legislative session and then approved by voters in a statewide ballot referendum amending the constitution. The second bill eliminates three vacant Traffic Court seats up for election this year and transfers the job of hearing traffic-ticket cases to appointed hearing examiners in Municipal Court.
NEWS
May 16, 2013 | BY CHRIS BRENNAN, Daily News Staff Writer brennac@phillynews.com, 215-854-5973
PHILADELPHIA Traffic Court is closer to extinction after just one Democrat voted yesterday to save the controversial agency. The state House's Judiciary Committee voted to approve two pieces of legislation designed to abolish the court. The full House will now consider the two bills, passed unanimously by the state Senate in February, just days after nine current or former Traffic Court judges were charged in a huge scheme to fix tickets as political favors. One of the bills, sponsored by Senate Majority Leader Dominic Pileggi, a Delaware County Republican, eliminates three vacant Traffic Court seats for which candidates are competing in Tuesday's primary election.
NEWS
April 10, 2013
By Crystal Miller-Spiegel 'De-extinction," the idea that extinct animals can be brought back through cloning or genetic engineering, has caught the interest of a small group of scientists. The topic graces the cover of this month's National Geographic. Proponents say they are doing it for moral reasons and because we "miss" the extinct animals. They cite human exploitation (e.g. hunting, habitat destruction) for the extinctions, but their plans, though they sound exciting, are exploitation in another form.
NEWS
February 10, 2013 | By Sarah El Deeb, Associated Press
CAIRO - During its heyday, it was famed as the lively and romantic heart of Arabic music - a Cairo street modeled after Paris' boulevards, home to musicians, belly-dancers, and instrument-makers. But Mohammed Ali Street is fading. It had already been in decline for years as a music center. Now the crunch of postrevolution Egypt may finish it off, amid economic crisis, uncontrolled urban sprawl, and the rising influence of Muslim conservatives, its patrons fear. The street in downtown Cairo, parts of it lined by French-style arched arcades, is now dominated by mobile-phone and electronics stores, donkey carts, and heavy traffic.
SPORTS
December 7, 2012 | Daily News Wire Reports
THE NFL KICKOFF could be nearing the point of no return. Commissioner Roger Goodell said Thursday the league's competition committee would consider in the offseason replacing the kickoff. The league previously had moved the kickoff from the 30- to 35-yard line to cut down on violent collisions. Tampa Bay coach Greg Schiano suggested that instead of kickoffs, teams would have the option of punting from the 30-yard line and going for a first down in a fourth-and-15 situation. Schiano witnessed one of his players at Rutgers, Eric LeGrand, get paralyzed on a kickoff in 2010.
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