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Extradition

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NEWS
April 7, 1988 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tennessee Gov. Ned R. McWherter signed extradition papers yesterday to send Jose Hernandez back to Pennsylvania to face first-degree murder charges in the deaths of four members of his family. Hernandez, 17, has been in Metro Juvenile Detention Center in Nashville since his arrest in Dickson County, Tenn., on March 24, three days after the bodies of his father, pregnant stepmother and two brothers were discovered piled in a bathtub in the family apartment in the 600 block of North Seventh Street.
NEWS
November 17, 1988 | By Gabriel Escobar, Daily News Staff Writer
Accused murderer and fugitive Ralph Birdsong will be turned over to Philadelphia police by week's end, after he appears in a Florida court, authorities said yesterday. Birdsong, 28, waived an extradition hearing yesterday before a U.S. magistrate in Fort Lauderdale. He is expected to do the same today or tomorrow when he appears in Broward County Circuit Court, authorities said. Wearing leg irons, grey sweatpants and work boots, Birdsong told Magistrate Lurana Snow that Philadelphia authorities had confiscated most of his possessions.
NEWS
May 14, 1987 | By David Lee Preston, Inquirer Staff Writer (United Press International contributed to this article.)
John Peter Galanis, charged in multimillion-dollar investment swindles that include Atlantic City's failed Boardwalk Marketplace project, waived extradition to New York at his arraignment yesterday in San Diego Municipal Court. Galanis, 44, of Del Mar, a San Diego suburb, was being held last night in the San Diego County Jail on a fugitive charge pending his extradition, authorities said. Galanis and his bookkeeper, Laurence H. Klusky, 40, signed extradition waivers at a joint arraignment yesterday morning, court officials said.
NEWS
December 11, 1990 | By Kitty Caparella, Daily News Staff Writer
An attorney for former federal judge Herbert A. Fogel filed an appeal yesterday in Tennessee to block Fogel's return to Philadelphia to face criminal contempt charges for leaving an alcohol recovery center nearly five months early. Nashville attorney Richard McGee said the appeal claims Fogel was being "illegally detained" in Tennessee. He said extradition papers sent by Pennsylvania were flawed because they do not say Fogel committed a crime in Pennsylvania and do not establish that he's a fugitive.
NEWS
January 13, 1999 | by Hubert Barat, Myung Oak Kim and Bob Warner, Special to the Daily News
Ira Einhorn, the one-time hippie-philosopher convicted of murdering his Philadelphia girlfriend in 1977, gained another five weeks of freedom yesterday as a French court postponed a decision on whether to extradite him to the United States. Without explanation, a panel of three French judges announced that they would not issue their extradition ruling until Feb. 18. The unexpected delay freed Einhorn to return to his cottage in the French countryside, and disappointed the three sisters of his dead girlfriend, Holly Maddux.
NEWS
November 9, 1990 | By Larry Eichel, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Irish Supreme Court conducted a hearing yesterday on whether Dessie Ellis should be sent off to England to face charges that he was involved in a deadly Irish Republican Army bombing campaign in 1981. Ellis was not in attendance. The 38-year-old former television repairman spent this day, the 30th day of his hunger strike against extradition, confined to his bed at Curragh Hospital. He was taken to the hospital Wednesday from Portlaoise Prison, his home for the last 7 1/2 years.
NEWS
November 14, 1990 | By Dianna Marder, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Florida prosecutor said yesterday that he would not seek extradition of a former Cumberland Farms cashier who said she was falsely accused of theft by the convenience store's security officials. Shirley Wells DiSalvo, 22, of Magnolia, Del., was nine months pregnant in August when she was picked up by Delaware State Police, imprisoned for five days and threatened with extradition to face trial in a theft that allegedly occurred four years ago in Florida. At a hearing in Dover, Del., yesterday, DiSalvo, who has since given birth to a boy, was told Florida officials would not seek her extradition.
NEWS
December 26, 1989 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Panama Canal Treaties give the United States the legal right to demand the extradition of deposed strongman Manuel Antonio Noriega, according to specialists in international law. But they say extradition isn't just about law, it's about politics, too. With Noriega now holed up in the Vatican mission in Panama City, it was uncertain yesterday where he would next reside. Noriega's predicament can be summed up as follows: The Vatican's got him. The United States wants him. The new Panamanian government says the United States can't have him. As of yesterday, the United States was hoping to have Noriega extradited to Florida to face drug-trafficking and money-laundering charges, said a State Department official working for the Panama Task Force.
NEWS
September 3, 1989 | By Lyle Denniston, Baltimore Sun
For two weeks, a U.S. government plane has been standing idle at an airport in Bogota, Colombia, a silent symbol of U.S. officials' current problems in using a blunt legal instrument to help Colombia in its war with drug lords. That instrument is extradition - in short, the transfer of a criminal suspect from one country to another for prosecution. It is a powerful weapon of law enforcement that has been in use since before the Middle Ages, with its modern use dating from the first extradition law adopted by the Belgians 156 years ago. Under extradition, one country hands over a fugitive from another country, without any final proof that the fugitive is actually guilty of any crime.
NEWS
March 26, 1994 | By Nancy Petersen, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A man who pleaded guilty earlier this month to the indecent assault of a Malvern girl is now facing extradition to Delaware for violating a lifetime parole stemming from a rape conviction in 1972. John Barton Hand, 43, of Collingdale, is being held in Chester County Prison on $100,000 cash bail following his arrest on Thursday on a fugitive warrant from Delaware, Lt. Hugh Murray of the Willistown Township Police Department said yesterday. Murray said Hand was sentenced to 10 years' probation by Chester County Common Pleas Court Judge M. Joseph Melody Jr. following his guilty plea on March 14. Police said the victim was baby-sitting at Hand's residence in October 1992 when the sexual assault occurred.
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NEWS
July 30, 2016
ISSUE | TURKEY A model Muslim Fethullah Gulen, the Turkish Islamic reformer, and Hizmet, the service organization he inspires, are being called out as "savages" who should be purged "by the roots" because the Turkish government regards them as responsible for the attempted coup d'├ętat on July 15. I know many members of the Hizmet movement, also called Gulenists, and they are gracious, thoughtful, and family-oriented. In 2015, Morehouse College in Atlanta awarded its prestigious Gandhi King Ikeda Peace Award to Gulen for his lifelong commitment to peace among nations and promotion of interfaith dialogue.
NEWS
July 27, 2016
ISSUE | TURKEY Extradite cleric The time has come for the United States to recognize that exiled Muslim cleric Fethullah Gulen is not a man of honor - he is a traitor ("Turkey requests cleric's extraditon," Wednesday). Through his network of henchmen, Gulen instructed and encouraged a military coup that failed earlier this month. Civilians, police, and young soldiers were drawn into a situation that could and should have been avoided. Lives have been lost unnecessarily, and families are suffering.
NEWS
July 20, 2016 | By Trudy Rubin, Columnist
Could an old man in Pennsylvania really be responsible for an attempted coup that nearly unseated a NATO ally and threatens America's fight against ISIS? That's the claim of Turkish president Recep Tayyip Erdogan, who is demanding that the United States extradite Fethullah Gulen, a 77-year-old Turkish cleric living on a 26-acre retreat in Saylorsburg, whom he blames for orchestrating the failed coup. Thanks to the Gulen uproar, Turkish media are filled with anti-American conspiracy theories charging Washington with endorsing the plot - a charge even some of Erdogan's cabinet ministers are making.
NEWS
July 19, 2016 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Staff Writer
SAYLORSBURG, Pa. - The reclusive Muslim cleric blamed by the Turkish government for last week's failed military coup said Sunday that he did not believe U.S. authorities would give in to Turkish demands for his extradition. But during a rare interview at his gated retreat in the Poconos, Fethullah Gulen, 77, said he would comply if the State Department asked him to leave. "If a request from what is essentially a dictator is taken seriously in the United States, I think it would run contrary to what the United States stands for," he said, speaking through an interpreter, of Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, a former ally turned bitter foe. "But if there is any possibility of a forceful extradition, of course we will oblige," he added.
NEWS
April 21, 2016 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Staff Writer
The Philadelphia District Attorney's Office withdrew all charges Tuesday against the suspect in a 1998 murder and dismemberment at a Chinatown restaurant, because the key witnesses against him have returned to China and were unavailable to testify against him. Kai Guo Huang, 39, was released from custody after an aborted preliminary hearing in the slaying of Hoi Yang, 27, in the basement of the former Min Du Restaurant in the unit block of North 10th...
NEWS
April 2, 2016
A man who was extradited from Lebanon after fleeing to evade money-laundering charges more than a decade ago made his first appearance Thursday in federal court in Philadelphia. Federal authorities charged Karim Messaoud, 47, in 2005 with conspiracy and 35 counts of money laundering tied to a scheme in which he allegedly sent more than more than $300,000 to the Dominican Republic and other nations for undercover FBI and Homeland Security agents posing as drug dealers. Messaoud allegedly sent the money transfers, which were structured to avoid U.S. currency reporting requirements, from Wise Communications, a shop he owned on the 2000 block of Fairmount Avenue, the indictment states.
NEWS
December 13, 2015 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Algerian-born terror suspect accused of recruiting Colleen "Jihad Jane" LaRose of Montgomery County in a 2009 plot to assassinate a Swedish artist was arrested Thursday in Spain, seven months after he dodged a U.S. bid to extradite him from Ireland. Spanish authorities said Friday that they detained Ali Charaf Damache, 50, at a hotel along Barcelona's busy Avinguda Meridiana after receiving a phone tip that he was living in the city. The Justice Department will again seek his extradition to face terrorism-related charges in Philadelphia, a spokeswoman for the U.S. Attorney's Office said.
NEWS
November 1, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ruling favors Polanski Polish-born filmmaker Roman Polanski , 83, who in 1977 fled to Europe after pleading guilty to having sex with a minor in California, won't be extradited to America anytime soon. A Polish court on Friday ruled against the latest attempt by American authorities to have Polanski sent back here to face justice. "I can breathe now with relief," the Oscar-winner told reporters in Krakow. The victim, Samantha Geimer , has said she forgives Polanski. Deso Dogg killed German rapper Deso Dogg ( Denis Cuspert )
NEWS
June 30, 2015 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was a murder on the New Jersey Turnpike - stunning violence near the New Brunswick exit. Now, decades after Black Liberation Army leader Joanne Chesimard was sentenced for the 1973 killing of a state trooper, escaped prison, and surfaced in Cuba in 1984, she is first and foremost among the estimated 70 American fugitives harbored there whose apparent flouting of U.S. law is fuel for critics of recent efforts to restore U.S.-Cuba relations....
NEWS
May 23, 2015 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Algerian-born terror suspect accused of recruiting Colleen "Jihad Jane" LaRose of Montgomery County into a 2009 plot to assassinate a Swedish artist won a two-year legal battle Thursday in Ireland to avoid extradition to the United States. A federal grand jury in Philadelphia charged Ali Charaf Damache in 2011 with one count each of terrorism conspiracy and attempted identity theft. The indictment is part of a case that has already sent LaRose and two others to prison. In the Dublin High Court decision Thursday, Justice Aileen Donnelly cited concerns over prison conditions in the United States and found that Irish state prosecutors had ignored their responsibility to attempt to try Damache first on terror charges in Ireland, where he holds citizenship.
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