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Extreme Sports

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NEWS
July 18, 1995 | by Theresa Conroy, Daily News Staff Writer
Tony Hawk steps onto his skateboard at the top of the 10-foot-high platform, hauls back to harness his strength, pushes off, then leans into the speed. He flies down the ramp and the crowd roars. He is, undoubtedly, the most impressive skateboarder in the country. He's one of the few who can make gliding on a board look like art - and one of the few who can inspire such a strong reaction from a crowd. Hawk, 26, from Carlsbad, Calif., was just 9 years old when he jumped on his first skateboard.
SPORTS
August 14, 2002 | By Todd Zolecki INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The X Games shift to the sports complex tomorrow, one day before former Phillies third baseman Scott Rolen arrives at Veterans Stadium with his new team, the St. Louis Cardinals. Fans planning on attending the X Games or a Phillies game are being advised to arrive earlier than usual, take alternate routes, and, if possible, take public transportation to avoid traffic congestion and parking problems. Last year, more than 200,000 fans flocked to the sports complex for the X Games.
SPORTS
February 3, 2013
I don't know what the limit is. To me, an athlete trying to do a backflip while driving a 450-pound snowmobile is insane. But for Caleb Moore and other freestyle snowmobilers, it's just another trick. Moore performed his failed stunt during the Winter X Games on Jan. 24 and died a week later. The stunt was difficult but apparently doable. He had done it many times before. So what do we make of this? By definition, "extreme" sports are difficult or dangerous, performed in a hazardous environment.
SPORTS
August 14, 2002 | By Shannon Ryan INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Chaz Conner has fallen off his skateboard enough to learn to wear a helmet and pads whenever he is riding. The 16-year-old from Trenton has never been seriously injured, but scrapes and bruises from minor crashes convinced him to wear black and blue pads on his knees, elbows and wrists, and strap a helmet atop his blond hair. "I like to feel safe," Conner said, wearing baggy shorts over his knee pads and a long T-shirt. "It's not fun to have to stop skating or take time off because you're hurt.
SPORTS
August 16, 2002 | By Shannon Ryan INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Letters from discouraged skaters often arrive for Cara-Beth Burnside. Usually, they are signed by teenage girls looking to get advice from a lady of legend in the world of extreme sports. She knows exactly what to tell them, too. Burnside, 34, has been skateboarding since she was growing up in Orange, Calif., skating with her brother and other neighborhood boys. Since then, she has been making inroads for female skaters and extreme-sports athletes. Burnside won the Mini-ramp and Vert at the All Girl Skate Jam in San Diego, and won at the Xbox World Championships in women's Bowl last year in Oceanside, Calif.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 2001 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Skateboarding, skyscraper-jumping, windsurfing, wave surfing, bike stunts, rock-climbing, snowboarding and, yes, extreme unicycling . . . are we exhausted yet? For two nights - Monday and Tuesday - the adrenaline-pumped world of extreme sports can be experienced on-screen at the Prince Music Theater, where the second annual Tube Film Festival, in conjunction with the 2001 X Games, unspools. Thirteen features and shorts are scheduled, focusing on the fast and the furious practitioners of these high-risk pursuits.
NEWS
August 14, 2001 | By Eils Lotozo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
These are fat times for female athletes. Women like Mia Hamm and the Williams sisters are celebrated as sports superstars. Women's soccer and basketball leagues are giving crack players the chance to turn pro. There's even - who would have believed it? - a new women's full-contact professional football league. So you'd think that women would be all over extreme sports. With its alternative trappings, this is where grrrl power should definitely rule. But a look at the roster of the ESPN X Games, which opened here over the weekend, reveals just 21 women in a field of more than 300 athletes.
NEWS
June 12, 2004 | By Don Sapatkin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The old guy in American flag socks was methodical at checkpoint No. 4 in the Northeast: water bottle out of the pack and onto the bike . . . light clamped on . . . teammate updated ("Bruce, I don't have my pedals on yet "). At 9:49 a.m., they were off on the next leg of Philadelphia's first adventure race, the multi-extreme sport that inspired Survivor. Behind them: An 8-mile run (wearing backpacks, on a route plotted with map and compass). A 100-meter swim. And an obstacle course done piggyback (bottom guy blindfolded)
NEWS
June 24, 1996 | By Frank Farley
There is a revolution going on in the sports world that few people are aware of: extreme sports. A major reason for the success of these sports - sky surfing, downhill-mountain biking, bungee jumping, skateboarding, to name a few - is that they appeal to a central facet of the American character: risk-taking. Extreme sports are fundamentally different from many traditional sports, especially team sports, in their attributes of risk-taking, variety, novelty, creativity, and expression of individuality.
NEWS
June 14, 2013
WHILE HOLLYWOOD has hardly lost its passion for 3-D productions, ESPN has. At year's end, the sports-TV giant will pull the plug on its high-definition ESPN 3D channel, launched in June 2010 with the FIFA World Cup and heavy up since then with stereoscopic showings of college basketball and football games and extreme sports meets. ESPN is investing in Ultra High Definition TV, boasting four times the pixel resolution of today's HDTV. UHD-TV also is more adept at presenting "auto-stereoscopic" (glasses-free)
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 2014 | By Patricia Mans, For The Inquirer
An independent, artistic 13-year-old, Parrish loves to draw and has exhibited his creations at his school's art show. He also designed the cover page for his class' poetry booklet. His interests, however, are not limited to art; they range from extreme sports to Shakespeare. He enjoys playing football and soccer, fishing, swimming, skateboarding, biking, and bowling. He also finds time to read classic literature (including Julius Caesar ), listen to a variety of music, play videogames, talk to friends on his cellphone, and even cook.
SPORTS
February 9, 2014 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
SOCHI - Women had been ski-jumping for decades when Jessica Jerome took her first flying leap at age 7. The Utah resident knew she liked it right away, nearly as quickly as her parents knew they did not. "My dad kept thinking of the agony of defeat [footage that shows a ski-jumper wiping out] from the Wide World of Sports," she said. But she did not give up and eventually, when her parents learned that neither their daughter nor any other young girl could grow up to be an Olympian jumper, their distaste became outrage.
NEWS
February 6, 2014 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's more than their unusual Black Sea locale that, for American TV viewers at least, will lend an exotic flavor to these 2014 Winter Olympics. Ninety years after 304 mostly aristocratic, mostly male amateurs gathered for the first Winter Games, Sochi's schedule will showcase several new daredevil sports, more team events, and a superstar roster dominated by females. With diminished women's figure-skating hopes and a men's hockey team so far absent from the gold-medal conversation, the United States will rely on much-improved bobsled and Alpine skiing teams as it seeks a second straight medal-count victory.
NEWS
June 14, 2013
WHILE HOLLYWOOD has hardly lost its passion for 3-D productions, ESPN has. At year's end, the sports-TV giant will pull the plug on its high-definition ESPN 3D channel, launched in June 2010 with the FIFA World Cup and heavy up since then with stereoscopic showings of college basketball and football games and extreme sports meets. ESPN is investing in Ultra High Definition TV, boasting four times the pixel resolution of today's HDTV. UHD-TV also is more adept at presenting "auto-stereoscopic" (glasses-free)
SPORTS
February 3, 2013
I don't know what the limit is. To me, an athlete trying to do a backflip while driving a 450-pound snowmobile is insane. But for Caleb Moore and other freestyle snowmobilers, it's just another trick. Moore performed his failed stunt during the Winter X Games on Jan. 24 and died a week later. The stunt was difficult but apparently doable. He had done it many times before. So what do we make of this? By definition, "extreme" sports are difficult or dangerous, performed in a hazardous environment.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 13, 2012
AS AMERICANS, we tend to believe that if a little is good, more must be better. This belief is deeply entrenched in our national psyche, and it's especially true when it comes to cardiovascular exercises like running. In America, running is considered the King of Exercise. After all, running is good for your cardiovascular health, aiding in the prevention of diseases such as heart disease, diabetes and obesity, right? Doesn't running increase bone density and help you live longer, too?
SPORTS
October 15, 2012 | By Matt Breen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Shaun White's cab was navigating the narrow streets of South Philadelphia on Friday night when the driver pointed out that Geno's Steaks was just ahead. "Where is it? I can't see it," White joked about the brightly lit steak shop. This was the snowboarder's first trip to Philadelphia - or at least he was pretty sure it was. After his flight from California, White couldn't decide between Pat's or Geno's, so he chose both. White, who has emerged as the face of extreme sports over the last decade, has won a pair of Olympic gold medals and is one of the world's elite in both snowboarding and skateboarding.
NEWS
July 7, 2012
Michael J. Ybarra, 45, a former Los Angeles Times reporter who had recently chronicled his extreme-sports adventures for the Wall Street Journal, was killed in a mountain-climbing fall over the weekend on the edge of Yosemite National Park. A veteran mountaineer, he had set out alone to cross the craggy Sawtooth Ridge in the Eastern Sierra and summited the 12,280-foot Matterhorn Peak before he fell about 200 feet to his death, said his sister, Suzanne Ybarra. His family reported him missing Sunday, and a rescue crew spotted his body Tuesday in a rugged area difficult to reach on foot, according to Kari Cobb, a park ranger.
SPORTS
October 27, 2007 | By Matt Pesyna FOR THE INQUIRER
Name: Chelsea Ley School: Kingsway Year: Sophomore Sport: Cross-country Credits: She is unbeaten in duals and big meets. Her time of 18 minutes, 24 seconds at Holmdel Park on Oct. 6 was the fastest of the day by 43 seconds. She set a meet record at the South Jersey Open at Delsea on Oct. 13, finishing in 17:50. She set the course record of 18:04 at Gloucester County College in the Glouco Meet. Question: What makes you such a good runner? Answer: I just think that I'm a real determined person, and I like it, too. If I didn't enjoy it so much, I would not be as good at it. Q: Do you have a certain plan before a race, or do you let it play out?
NEWS
February 19, 2005 | By Don Sapatkin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Snowshoeing is the fastest-growing form of recreation tracked by the Outdoor Industry Association (edging out less weather-dependent kayaking). It is easy to learn (just strap 'em on and go), healthy (1,000 low-impact calories an hour, uphill) and cheap ($15 a day rental, no lift fees). All you need is snow. In most years, driving to the lower Poconos or north would pretty much guarantee the requisite eight inches. Even the city and suburbs often offer blankets of snow for four or five weeks starting about now. But you wouldn't find much snow on trails where people walk.
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