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Extremist Groups

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NEWS
July 2, 1995 | By Glen Justice, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
They call themselves Patriots, a loose association of antigovernment militia members, tax protesters, conspiracy theorists and gun advocates. And while they may be on the extreme fringe of American politics, they are in the mainstream when it comes to the communications revolution, specializing in the use of the Internet, faxes, short-wave radio and cable TV. "It is arguably the first U.S. social movement to be organized primarily through nontraditional...
NEWS
April 30, 1995 | By Lori Montgomery, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Is the U.S. military a fetid breeding ground for subversive, right-wing violence? The Pentagon says no, but members of the motley state militias vilified in the aftermath of the bombing in Oklahoma City say that they have lots of support from active-duty members of the armed services. Either way, the controversy over the so-called unorganized militias is likely to produce continuing problems for the Pentagon. Since former Army Sgt. Timothy J. McVeigh was identified as a prime suspect in the bombing, the military has been struggling to cope with the fallout.
NEWS
April 26, 2011 | By Alex Rodriguez, Los Angeles Times
ISLAMABAD, Pakistan - Authorities at Guantanamo Bay regarded Pakistan's national intelligence agency, ISI, as either involved in or supporting terrorism, according to leaked documents made public Monday, a designation that could anger leaders in the nuclear-armed Muslim country and worsen a relationship already marred by deep mutual distrust. Disclosures that tie the ISI to terrorist and extremist groups are nothing new. Just last week, in a visit to Pakistan, Adm. Mike Mullen, chairman of the U.S. Joint Chiefs of Staff, raised the allegation of a relationship between the ISI and the Haqqani network, an Afghan Taliban wing.
NEWS
June 7, 2001 | By Leonard N. Fleming INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The images were disturbing: white-supremacist insignia, tattoos reflecting membership in racist groups, CDs used to spew those groups' hatred of Jews, blacks and Latinos. The 50 officers and other military personnel in the small room listened intently during a voluntary tutorial presented by the New Jersey chapter of the Anti-Defamation League yesterday, part of a new effort to identify and stop recruitment of the military's rank and file by extremists. The men and women in the McGuire Air Force Base audience sat through a slide presentation that focused on hate groups' leaders as well as on their aggressive efforts to attract members.
NEWS
July 22, 2005 | By Chris Mondics INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Contending that Saudi Arabia remains a center of financing and recruitment for extremists, Sen. Frank Lautenberg (D., N.J.) says it is time for the United States to consider ending military cooperation with the Saudis unless they crack down more forcefully on radical Islamic groups. Lautenberg and his staff have prepared a 12-page report detailing links between extremist groups and Saudi financiers in an effort to persuade Congress and the White House to reexamine the relationship.
NEWS
November 1, 1999 | by Myung Oak Kim, Daily News Staff Writer
When EgyptAir Flight 990 crashed in the Atlantic yesterday morning, killing all 217 aboard, aviation officials and President Clinton were quick to deny signs of foul play. "We have no evidence of that at this time, and I think it's better if people draw no conclusions until we know something," Clinton said yesterday after attending church. But by yesterday evening, aviation officials could not rule out the possibility that the Boeing 767 exploded from a terrorist bomb. It may be a long time before officials identify the cause of the crash.
NEWS
August 8, 2012 | Daily News Editorial
It couldn't have happened without the guns, of course. The easy availability of weapons and ammunition is the common denominator that ties Sunday's mass killing in a Sikh temple in Wisconsin to most of the other multiple murders in America in recent years: at a movie theater in Aurora, Colo.; at a shopping center in Tucson, Ariz.; at Fort Hood, Texas; at Virginia Tech; at Columbine. For some of the killers, mental instability clearly is a factor. For example, Jared Loughner was deemed mentally incompetent to stand trial for the killing of six people and the wounding of 13 others, including U.S. Rep. Gabrielle Giffords, in 2010.
NEWS
November 18, 2009 | By PATRICK CUNNANE
BARACK Obama's presidency may hinge on the future of the Afghanistan war and a sound understanding of Islamic extremists and the world in which they operate. Extremists are global and their actors are mobile. Thus, a victory in Afghanistan doesn't necessarily mean a victory in the war on terror against al Qaeda. As the United States moves forward in Afghanistan, some of our reasons for being there in the first place - like al Qaeda - have moved; Osama bin Laden and Ayman al Zawahiri are believed to be hiding in the tribal areas of Pakistan, and the terror group is thought to be discussing a move to Somalia or Yemen.
NEWS
July 23, 2010 | By MARILYN MAYO
OVER THE last year and a half, far-right extremism has blossomed, fueled by an intense distrust and hatred of the federal government in general and of President Obama in particular. To anti-government extremists, including a growing number of militia groups, the government is not only dangerous but an actual enemy to be defeated. Pennsylvania hasn't been immune to this rise in anti-government extremism, particularly the increase in militia activity. In January, a number of small militia groups planned to conduct paramilitary training in the Micheaux State Forest.
NEWS
October 15, 2002
The terrorist bombings in Bali have drawn outcries from around the world. Here is a selection of highlights from the world press: Iraq focus misguided For months, while their political masters have been increasingly obsessed by Saddam Hussein, Western intelligence agencies have warned of planned terrorist attacks by al-Qaeda or, more likely, other Islamist extremist groups with similar objectives and outlook. They warned in particular about the likelihood of attacks on such American and British targets as bases and embassies - targets that represent the governmental or military presence of Western countries in the Muslim world.
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NEWS
January 11, 2013 | By Darran Simon, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Haddon Township man who authorities said belonged to a federally monitored anti-government extremist group, was arrested today on charges of illegally possessing multiple firearms. Gregory Gawrysiak, 46, was being held in the Camden County Jail on $500,000 bail. The charges against him include one of possessing an assault firearm, according to the Camden County Prosecutor's Office, Haddon Township Police, and the Pennsylvania Attorney General's Gun Task Force. In 2012, Gawrysiak purchased two pistols, a rifle and a shotgun in Pennsylvania after fraudulently obtaining a Pennsylvania driver's license using a relatives's address, authorities said.
NEWS
August 8, 2012 | Daily News Editorial
It couldn't have happened without the guns, of course. The easy availability of weapons and ammunition is the common denominator that ties Sunday's mass killing in a Sikh temple in Wisconsin to most of the other multiple murders in America in recent years: at a movie theater in Aurora, Colo.; at a shopping center in Tucson, Ariz.; at Fort Hood, Texas; at Virginia Tech; at Columbine. For some of the killers, mental instability clearly is a factor. For example, Jared Loughner was deemed mentally incompetent to stand trial for the killing of six people and the wounding of 13 others, including U.S. Rep. Gabrielle Giffords, in 2010.
NEWS
September 24, 2011 | By Alex Rodriguez, Los Angeles Times
ISLAMABAD - Pakistani officials warned they could jettison the United States as an ally if American officials continue to accuse Islamabad's intelligence agency of assisting a leading Afghan Taliban group in recent attacks in Afghanistan. Foreign Minister Hina Rabbani Khar cautioned the United States against airing allegations such as that of collusion between Pakistan's Inter-Services Intelligence agency and the extremist Haqqani network, a blunt charge made Thursday by Adm. Mike Mullen, chairman of the U.S. Joint Chiefs of Staff, before the Senate Armed Services Committee.
NEWS
June 2, 2011 | By Chris Brummitt, Associated Press
MAMAD GAT, Pakistan - A top Pakistani commander said Wednesday that the army intended to start operations against extremists in a strategic tribal region that juts deep into Afghanistan, part of a rolling campaign to eliminate insurgents on its side of the border. But Lt. Gen. Asif Yasin Malik said the force had no immediate plan to attack the neighboring extremist haven of North Waziristan, an al-Qaeda stronghold from which many of the deadliest attacks against U.S. troops in Afghanistan are organized and launched.
NEWS
April 26, 2011 | By Alex Rodriguez, Los Angeles Times
ISLAMABAD, Pakistan - Authorities at Guantanamo Bay regarded Pakistan's national intelligence agency, ISI, as either involved in or supporting terrorism, according to leaked documents made public Monday, a designation that could anger leaders in the nuclear-armed Muslim country and worsen a relationship already marred by deep mutual distrust. Disclosures that tie the ISI to terrorist and extremist groups are nothing new. Just last week, in a visit to Pakistan, Adm. Mike Mullen, chairman of the U.S. Joint Chiefs of Staff, raised the allegation of a relationship between the ISI and the Haqqani network, an Afghan Taliban wing.
NEWS
July 23, 2010 | By MARILYN MAYO
OVER THE last year and a half, far-right extremism has blossomed, fueled by an intense distrust and hatred of the federal government in general and of President Obama in particular. To anti-government extremists, including a growing number of militia groups, the government is not only dangerous but an actual enemy to be defeated. Pennsylvania hasn't been immune to this rise in anti-government extremism, particularly the increase in militia activity. In January, a number of small militia groups planned to conduct paramilitary training in the Micheaux State Forest.
NEWS
November 18, 2009 | By PATRICK CUNNANE
BARACK Obama's presidency may hinge on the future of the Afghanistan war and a sound understanding of Islamic extremists and the world in which they operate. Extremists are global and their actors are mobile. Thus, a victory in Afghanistan doesn't necessarily mean a victory in the war on terror against al Qaeda. As the United States moves forward in Afghanistan, some of our reasons for being there in the first place - like al Qaeda - have moved; Osama bin Laden and Ayman al Zawahiri are believed to be hiding in the tribal areas of Pakistan, and the terror group is thought to be discussing a move to Somalia or Yemen.
NEWS
July 22, 2005 | By Chris Mondics INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Contending that Saudi Arabia remains a center of financing and recruitment for extremists, Sen. Frank Lautenberg (D., N.J.) says it is time for the United States to consider ending military cooperation with the Saudis unless they crack down more forcefully on radical Islamic groups. Lautenberg and his staff have prepared a 12-page report detailing links between extremist groups and Saudi financiers in an effort to persuade Congress and the White House to reexamine the relationship.
NEWS
February 1, 2005 | By Michael Matza INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Founded as a radical resistance movement in the 1980s, the Islamic fundamentalist group Hamas is turning itself into an efficient vote-getting political machine. In the first local elections in the Gaza Strip, Hamas-affiliated candidates swept seven of 10 municipalities last week, taking 77 of 118 local-council seats. Beit Hanoun, where Hamas surprised even itself by taking 11 of 13 seats, "was our sweetest victory," said Hamas spokesman Sami Abu Zukri, citing the northern Gaza Strip town from which rockets have been launched at Israel and that has suffered, in turn, from retaliatory raids that have leveled hundreds of acres of farmland.
NEWS
January 18, 2005 | By Michael Matza INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas begins consolidating power, he is considering naming seasoned Fatah leader Nasser Yusef to the post of interior minister, in which he would oversee the proposed realignment of Palestinian security forces in the choppy wake of Yasir Arafat's one-man rule. Arafat rejected two earlier attempts to give the job to Yusef, who staged a crackdown on Hamas in the 1990s. His appointment by Abbas and Prime Minister Ahmed Qureia would send a clear signal to armed Palestinian groups that things have changed.
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