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Eye Care

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NEWS
December 4, 1988 | By Charles McCurdy, Special to The Inquirer
Orbis is a word with two derivations: It means "of the eye" in Greek and "around the world" in Latin. Orbis also is the name of a seven-year-old, nonprofit organization that flies eye doctors and nurses to Third World countries. And it is an appropriate name for the plane that has flown the 25-member medical teams to 53 countries. A 20-year-old DC-8, it was donated to the organization in 1982 and transformed into a flying hospital, with microsurgical and laser technology, an 18-seat classroom and television cameras to transmit the operations from the surgical studio to the classroom.
NEWS
February 18, 1986 | By Edgar Williams, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mike Gordon smiled as he pointed to the packing cases arrayed like a minor mountain range, each case plastered with a large sticker that read SOSH. "What we have here," he said, "may be the best-traveled freight you've ever seen. It's been to Haiti and it was brought back unopened, and now it's going to Dominica. " At this point it seems advisable to point out that SOSH stands for "Student Optometric Service to Haiti," that it is a project conducted annually by seniors at the Pennsylvania College of Optometry, and that SOSH '86 is going to be different.
NEWS
April 19, 1989 | By Scott Brodeur, Special to The Inquirer
Through a joint effort with the Board of Freeholders, the Gloucester County Lions' Clubs will open a vision center Friday to supply eye care to needy families in the county. County residents deemed eligible will be able to receive free vision screenings and eyeglass prescriptions at the center, which will be at the County Health Center on Carpenter Street. The center's grand opening will be celebrated with a ribbon-cutting ceremony at 11 a.m. Friday with local and county officials.
NEWS
April 6, 1997 | By Patricia Smith, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
There could very well be Bolivian peasants high in the Andes Mountains wearing 1950s-style rhinestone-studded eyeglasses. And it would be because of the Laurel Springs Lions Club. For the last three months, the Laurel Springs Lions have been working with a Maryknoll missionary in Bolivia, a nonprofit aid organization based in North Carolina, an eye doctor in Somerdale, and a native Bolivian living in Pine Hill to provide eye care for 800,000 rural Bolivians. And a big part of that eye care involves collecting old eyeglasses from South Jersey residents and out-of-style glasses donated by stores - and shipping them to Bolivia.
NEWS
October 17, 2011
Ametek Inc., a Berwyn manufacturer of electronic instruments and electromechanical devices, said it added to its medical devices operations with the purchase of Reichert Technologies, a maker of analytical instruments and diagnostic devises for eye care. Ametek said it paid $150 million for privately held Reichert, which is based in a suburb of Buffalo. Reichert's annual sales were estimated at $55 million, Ametek said. Ametek had $2.47 billion in revenue last year.
NEWS
October 16, 2007 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ophthalmologist Ralph Scott Sando lived a charmed life with a loving family, a successful career in a city known for eye care, and a silent but consistent civic-mindedness. Dr. Sando, 60, founder of Accuvision Eye MD Caregroup in Ardmore and Center City, who also practiced in several Philadelphia hospitals, died Saturday of esophageal cancer at his home in Haverford. Dr. Sando was born in Boulder, Colo., in 1947. He and his family moved to Merion when he was 12. He was captain of the football team, bowman of the crew team, and recipient of so many awards at Monsignor Bonner High School that he was given a standing ovation upon graduation in 1965 at the Civic Center.
NEWS
September 24, 1987 | By Reid Kanaley, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Tredyffrin/Easttown school board has ratified a three-year contract for the district's 180 noninstructional employees. The contract was approved, 5-0, at a special board meeting Monday. It provides raises of 4 percent to 6 percent this year, and 5 percent to 6.5 percent per year for the second and third years. Rates differ according to job categories. The agreement covers members of the Tredyffrin/Easttown Noninstructional Group (TENIG). The union represents the district's maintenance, custodial, cafeteria, secretarial and transporation workers.
NEWS
September 6, 1988 | Compiled from reports from A Positive Approach magazine, American Health and the Inquirer wire services
GUIDE FOR THE DISABLED. Charles D. Goldman, a Washington lawyer, has written a 172-page guide for the disabled, called Disability Rights Guide, Practical Solutions to Problems Affecting People with Disabilities. The book discusses housing, employment, education and transportation for the disabled. From 1975 to 1983, Goldman served as general counsel for the Architectural Transportation Barriers Compliance Board in Washington. Now he is a lawyer specializing in disability-rights issues.
NEWS
January 20, 2006 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
E. Howard Bedrossian, 84, of Drexel Hill, an ophthalmologist from a family that has provided eye care to Delaware County residents for more than 82 years, died of heart failure Sunday at Bryn Mawr Terrace. Dr. Bedrossian's father, Edward, established the practice in Drexel Hill in 1923. In the 1950s, Dr. Bedrossian took over and later shared the practice with his son Ned for 23 years, until retiring in June. For more than 40 years, Dr. Bedrossian taught at the University of Pennsylvania and Thomas Jefferson University.
NEWS
May 31, 1998 | By Richard Sine, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
It is said the eye is the window to the soul. It is also the window to the body, ophthalmologist Leonard Ginsburg said. By looking into eyes, Ginsburg said, he has diagnosed problems such as diabetes and impotency. He said that his new eye hospital would be well-positioned to care not just for the eyes, but for the whole body as well. The Moore Eye Institute is scheduled to open formally June 9 at the Crozer-Keystone Healthplex on Route 320, although it has been accepting patients since February.
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SPORTS
September 15, 2015 | BY ANDREW ALBERT, For the Daily News
TYREKE EVANS took three steps up into an RV that had been converted into a VSP Mobile Eyes Clinic outside Chester City Hall. As he ducked to get through the door, volunteers greeted the New Orleans Pelicans guard as if they had been friends for years. Evans proceeded through the vehicle and knocked on, then opened one of the exam room doors. A doctor looked around the state-of-the-art equipment and was thrilled to see the 2010 NBA Rookie of the Year looking back at him. The woman who was being examined was just as excited to see Evans.
NEWS
April 14, 2014 | By Jerry Iannelli, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA Amira Davis, 9, sits near the front of her fourth-grade classroom each day at Aldan Elementary School in Delaware County. She can read each word when her teacher spells out lessons in thick, glossy strokes of black marker on the room's central whiteboard. But, she recently told her mother, when her teacher fires up the room's overhead projector, Amira has to squint to make out the words. "If she didn't mention that she couldn't see the board, we never would have come today," Amira's mother, Amber Lozado, said.
NEWS
October 28, 2013 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Imagine a bathtub with the faucet running all the time. When the drainpipe gets clogged, the water backs up in the tub. When the drain completely closes, the water collects until it overflows the tub. The analogy is imperfect, but that's sort of what happens in glaucoma, the leading cause of irreversible blindness. Poor drainage causes fluid buildup in the eye. Except that the eyeball, unlike a tub, is a closed structure, so fluid pressure builds up, harming the sensitive optic nerve.
NEWS
October 7, 2013 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
Abraham Gonen has an ambitious mission: improving eye care around the world. "You could say this is a 24-hour job," says the Cherry Hill resident, 66, associate dean for global development at Salus University in Elkins Park. The university was called Pennsylvania College of Optometry and was in Philadelphia when Gonen earned his doctorate there in the late 1960s. Renamed in 2008, Salus (a Latin word for health and well-being) now offers advanced degree, degree completion, continuing education, and certification programs to optometry students and professionals already working in the field in the Far East, Scandinavia, and other parts of Europe.
NEWS
October 17, 2011
Ametek Inc., a Berwyn manufacturer of electronic instruments and electromechanical devices, said it added to its medical devices operations with the purchase of Reichert Technologies, a maker of analytical instruments and diagnostic devises for eye care. Ametek said it paid $150 million for privately held Reichert, which is based in a suburb of Buffalo. Reichert's annual sales were estimated at $55 million, Ametek said. Ametek had $2.47 billion in revenue last year.
NEWS
July 26, 2011 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
His name was Rocky, and he was a real-life underdog. The 8-week-old Siberian Husky-mix puppy was a stray found in a remote section of western Canada, "with nothing in his belly but worms on rocks," Brier Cadden wrote in a Feb. 7, 2010, e-mail. "No one wanted to touch him because they didn't like what his eyes looked like. " Rocky had an eye condition and was almost blind. Cadden, now 33, sent the e-mail to the Philadelphia-based Blind Dog Rescue Alliance, which she found by searching Google.
NEWS
May 15, 2011 | By Dave Carpenter, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Fretting is the new normal for retirement. We haven't saved enough, too many of us retire without financial security, and we may need to work longer to achieve it - assuming we can hang on to our jobs or find new ones. No wonder that workers and retirees are more pessimistic about their future prospects than they've been in years. The outlook shouldn't remain that glum if the economy keeps improving. But it's critical to understand how retirement has changed. Here's a look at some retiree money myths and the facts behind them: Medicare covers all important health-care costs.
NEWS
October 30, 2010 | By Trishula Patel, Inquirer Staff Writer
On Saturday, any child in Philadelphia who is not insured or is underinsured can go to Wills Eye Institute for a free eye exam and two pairs of free glasses, if needed. Pennsylvania law requires that all students receive vision screenings at school. But nearly 14,000 children in Philadelphia who failed their screening test last year did not receive any follow-up care, according to Public Citizens for Children and Youth. To bridge part of the gap, Wills' second annual Give Kids Sight Day expects to reach about 2,000 children from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wills Eye will also ensure that children who attend Saturday's event and cannot get in for a screening can return another day for an appointment.
NEWS
July 28, 2009 | By Michael Vitez INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Lawrence Ragone could see a need. He had a vision. Born in Camden, he started his practice in optometry there in 1956. He quickly realized many in Camden - and this was 50 years ago - couldn't afford eye care. So in 1961, he persuaded fellow optometrists to open a clinic for the poor. Ragone retired from his practice in 1994 and went to work full time as executive director of the clinic he founded, the Camden Eye Center, renamed last month the South Jersey Eye Center.
NEWS
October 16, 2007 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ophthalmologist Ralph Scott Sando lived a charmed life with a loving family, a successful career in a city known for eye care, and a silent but consistent civic-mindedness. Dr. Sando, 60, founder of Accuvision Eye MD Caregroup in Ardmore and Center City, who also practiced in several Philadelphia hospitals, died Saturday of esophageal cancer at his home in Haverford. Dr. Sando was born in Boulder, Colo., in 1947. He and his family moved to Merion when he was 12. He was captain of the football team, bowman of the crew team, and recipient of so many awards at Monsignor Bonner High School that he was given a standing ovation upon graduation in 1965 at the Civic Center.
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