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Eye Surgery

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SPORTS
April 18, 1996 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
Minnesota Twins outfielder Kirby Puckett yesterday underwent the first of what may be a series of operations to stave off the effects of glaucoma. Bert Glaser performed the operation at the Retina Institute of Maryland, which is part of the St. Joseph Medical Center in Towson. Puckett, a 10-time all-star who has not played this season, first complained of poor vision during spring training. It turned out that blood vessels feeding the retina in his right eye became partially blocked because of increased pressure caused by glaucoma.
SPORTS
September 10, 2000 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Red Sox pitcher Bryce Florie has serious eye damage and underwent surgery yesterday in Boston after being struck in the face by a line drive that bloodied him a night earlier. "Prognosis for reasonable vision is guarded," team physician Bill Morgan said. The right eyeball of the 30-year-old reliever was not ruptured, and his retina was damaged but not detached. The operation at Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary was done to release pressure on the eye and assess the damage.
SPORTS
December 5, 1998 | by Mike Kern, Daily News Sports Writer
The strength of Temple's basketball team, its four-man guard line, just got 25 percent thinner. Sophomore Lynn Greer, a 47 percent three-point shooter last season, underwent surgery last night at Wills Eye Hospital to repair a small fracture to the bone under his left eye. The injury occurred with 7:17 left in Tuesday's one-point loss at Penn State, when he caught an inadvertent elbow from the Nittany Lions' Calvin Booth going after a rebound....
SPORTS
December 7, 1998 | by Mike Kern, Daily News Sports Writer
The good news is, Lynn Greer's broken orbital bone under his left eye could be healed in another two months or so. The bad news is, it doesn't look as if he's going to play basketball for Temple again until next season. The sophomore guard, the Owls' best perimeter shooter, underwent surgery Friday night at Wills Eye Hospital to repair the fracture, which occurred with 7 minutes, 17 seconds left in Tuesday's one-point loss at Penn State. Greer was injured when he was hit by an inadvertent elbow by PSU's Calvin Booth while the two were going for a rebound.
NEWS
October 13, 2011 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
Not long after two snow leopard cubs were born at the Philadelphia Zoo in June - a first for the institution - keepers noticed something troubling. The male cubs, Kimti and Dian, had upper eyelid abnormalities. The center of each lid edge was missing, so their eyes were irritated. One had hair in an eye. The medical conditiom - coloboma - is known in humans and animals including domestic short-haired cats and Florida panthers. And snow leopards. It can be fixed by surgery.
NEWS
June 2, 2015 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
MILLVILLE - When Thomas Walkup was denied educational services in April from the state Commission for the Blind and Visually Impaired - services that may have helped the 8-year-old to cope with a congenital condition known as "shaky eye syndrome" - his mother wouldn't give up on finding help. And, ultimately, the rejection inspired Susan Walkup Banks to find a solution - surgery in California this summer - that may restore full vision for her son. Thomas has dealt with congenital nystagmus since birth.
NEWS
December 7, 1991 | By Marc Schogol Compiled from reports from Inquirer wire services
CAFFEINED OUT The coffee you drink to stay alert could backfire on you. According to a University of Maryland study, most people perform best at a level of nervous- system arousal that isn't too high or too low, GQ magazine reports. Researchers found that if a task is tediously routine, caffeine can keep you productive longer. But if a task is demanding and unfamiliar, caffeine may leave you too wired to handle it. EYE ON TNE NEWS If you're 50 to 80 years old and have diabetes, the Scheie Eye Institute is looking for you. Researchers are conducting a study of a new, harmless, painless test to detect glaucoma.
SPORTS
October 18, 2003 | Daily News Wire Services
Detroit Red Wings defenseman Derian Hatcher will miss 4 to 6 months after tearing a ligament in his right knee during a game. He was hurt when he got tangled up with Vancouver's Markus Naslund and Bryan Allen early in Detroit's 3-2 victory Thursday. "He was very disappointed," Detroit coach Dave Lewis said. "He's upset. " Hatcher is expected to have surgery in a couple of weeks, once the swelling goes down. The Red Wings hope he will be able to return in time for the playoffs, which begin in April.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2013
1 BUCKLE UP EVERY TIME Every year thousands of lives are saved because of seat belts - about 30 percent of highway deaths are attributed to the occupants' not being restrained. 2 ANNUAL CHECKUP See the doctor at least once a year for a physical. When you go to the doctor have your blood pressure, blood sugar, triglycerides and cholesterol tested. Ask for the results and maintain a file with the numbers. This way you can see where you're trending and manage a problem before it starts.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 2016 | By Anndee Hochman
The dates were so bad, so epically awful, that Angie started blogging about them: The man whose ex-wife showed up in the middle of their restaurant dinner and threatened to kill herself. The guy who suggested they meet in front of a bar, then confessed that he didn't drink and was strapped for cash. There were men who wanted to get married in a hot minute, men who bore no resemblance to their online profile pictures, men who sweated profusely even while sitting still. It was enough to make Angie, then a naval architect in Washington, rethink her longtime life plan: the "forever" guy, the baby, the white picket fence.
NEWS
June 2, 2015 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
MILLVILLE - When Thomas Walkup was denied educational services in April from the state Commission for the Blind and Visually Impaired - services that may have helped the 8-year-old to cope with a congenital condition known as "shaky eye syndrome" - his mother wouldn't give up on finding help. And, ultimately, the rejection inspired Susan Walkup Banks to find a solution - surgery in California this summer - that may restore full vision for her son. Thomas has dealt with congenital nystagmus since birth.
SPORTS
March 12, 2015 | BY RYAN LAWRENCE, Daily News Staff Writer rlawrence@phillynews.com
CLEARWATER, Fla. - The look was remarkably familiar. Cliff Lee sat in front of his locker stall yesterday afternoon while his teammates took on the Detroit Tigers outside the clubhouse doors. He was in uniform, but in no position to help out. He spoke with an uncertain voice, looked ahead with eyes unsure of what the future held for him in the game he's played, in one way or another, for 3 decades. "It's not a good sign, obviously," Lee said of the same injury that limited him to 13 starts in 2014 returning before he even could begin 2015.
NEWS
December 7, 2013 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
During his 30 years with the New York mob, Anthony Aponick grew adept at juggling business both legitimate and illegitimate - or, as he described it, "walking and chewing gum at the same time. " But he spent much of Thursday discussing a more ambiguous form of income as he testified for a second day in the racketeering retrial of reputed Philadelphia mob consigliere George Borgesi: money he earned as a professional informant. Between 2002 and 2013, the FBI paid the 42-year-old former Bonanno crime family associate $152,000 for coughing up information on Borgesi, with whom he shared a cell in a federal detention center in West Virginia.
SPORTS
August 15, 2013 | By Matt Gelb, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTA - The pitcher who shut down the best team in baseball Monday just so happened to lead the majors in losses. Cole Hamels is the latest proof of why measuring a pitcher by his win-loss record is arcane. Ask the hitters he silenced. "He might have been the best pitcher we've seen all year," Braves outfielder Justin Upton said. Hamels (5-13) was that good Monday in a complete-game victory, and his recovery from a shaky beginning to 2013 is notable. His ERA is 3.65, the lowest it has been all season.
NEWS
July 27, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jayne Ezell, 59, of Haverford Township, a former nurse manager at Wills Eye Hospital, died Saturday, July 13, of respiratory failure at her home. Mrs. Ezell, who had severe progressive spinal disease and scoliosis, survived two medical emergencies in 2012, but had made substantial progress toward rehabilitation before she died in her sleep. In 1974, she began working as a nurse at Wills, where she remained for 28 years. She specialized in emergency and trauma nursing before becoming an operating-room assistant nurse in both ophthalmology at Wills and in neurosurgery with the Thomas Jefferson University Hospital neurosciences department.
NEWS
July 2, 2013 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lynda Evans LeComte, 60, was a trauma surgical unit nurse at Hahnemann University Hospital, and, her husband, Joseph, said, "she loved it. " But one day in the 1980s, he said, "two kids were sitting on a front stoop and a driver ran into them and killed them. " When their corpses were brought to the hospital for organ harvest, he said, the sight affected her so much she asked for and got reassignment to the orthopedics unit. On Tuesday, June 25, Mrs. LeComte died of liver failure at Hope Hospice in Cape Coral, Fla. She had lived in Cape Coral since 2002.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2013
1 BUCKLE UP EVERY TIME Every year thousands of lives are saved because of seat belts - about 30 percent of highway deaths are attributed to the occupants' not being restrained. 2 ANNUAL CHECKUP See the doctor at least once a year for a physical. When you go to the doctor have your blood pressure, blood sugar, triglycerides and cholesterol tested. Ask for the results and maintain a file with the numbers. This way you can see where you're trending and manage a problem before it starts.
BUSINESS
October 26, 2012 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Dozens of Philadelphia-area health-care facilities, including some of the largest hospitals, were among the thousands nationwide that received products in the last five months from the Massachusetts compounding pharmacy at the center of the fungal-meningitis outbreak that has killed more than 20 people. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has issued a 73-page list of health-care facilities that received at least one drug from New England Compounding Center in Framingham, Mass., which has been shut down because of tainted products.
NEWS
October 23, 2012 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
Maurice Bertrand's football physique likely saved his life when he was shot five times on a blistering summer day last year in Camden. When he arrived at Cooper University Hospital, "first thing they said was, 'This guy is still alive?' " Bertrand recalled recently at Lincoln University in Chester County, where he has resumed the sport many thought he'd never play again. Doctors, including Robert Ostrum, the surgeon who helped save former New Jersey Gov. Jon S. Corzine after a serious auto accident, rushed to tend to Bertrand's injuries: High-caliber bullets had broken Bertrand's right thigh bone into 10 or 15 pieces, gone through his left ankle, and struck his back; one hit his left biceps so hard it went through his shoulder and into his eye. Bertrand's large body - 6-foot-2 and 280 pounds - helped stop the bullets from puncturing vital organs.
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