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BUSINESS
April 29, 1989 | The Inquirer Staff
Unilever, the European consumer- products conglomerate, yesterday said it had dropped its plan to purchase the Faberge and Elizabeth Arden lines of toiletries, cosmetics and fragrances for $1.55 billion from Riklis Family Corp. Negotiations on a definitive pact broke down because the Riklis group sought "significant changes in the structure and terms of the transaction which would have involved Unilever in substantial additional costs," according to an announcement from Unilever United States Inc., the U.S. arm of the British-Dutch firm.
NEWS
May 28, 1999 | By Bob Cooney, Daily News Staff Writer
POETIC TWIST Poetry author Nzadi Keita will read from and discuss her work at Robin's Book Store, 108 S. 13th St., at 7 p.m. FRIDAY. The author of the poetry collection "Birthmarks," Keita has written for many journals, including American Poetry Review, River Styk and Long Shot Review. Admission is free. Info: 215-735-9600. LOCAL VOCAL Haverford-based singer Barbara Montgomery will sing her mixture of ballads, blues and up-tempo songs at Rock Lobster, 221 N. Delaware Ave., from 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. FRIDAY.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 23, 1987 | By RENEE V. LUCAS, Daily News Staff Writer
"Love Among Thieves" (tonight, 9 p.m., Channel 6) has many problems, not the least of which are Audrey Hepburn and Robert Wagner. While we might be willing to watch the likes of Kathleen Turner and Michael Douglas cavort from peril to peril in flims like "Romancing the Stone" and "Jewel of the Nile," it is painfully embarrassing to watch the much older Hepburn and Wagner dash madly about in the kind of "Yikes! Here come the bad guys!" caricature that is "Love Among Thieves. " Hepburn looks as though she may go into cardiac arrest at any moment, and a blimpy Wagner, who may or may not be the bad guy, is certainly the heavy.
NEWS
June 24, 1990 | By Richard V. Sabatini, Inquirer Staff Writer
If you'd like a waitressing job but really want to be outdoors this summer - a Bustleton restaurateur has a deal for you. Arnold's Drive-In Restaurant, scheduled to open mid-July at Bustleton Avenue and Bleigh Street, is hiring roller-skating car hops and waitresses for its back-to-the-50s style operation. Owner Dan Vassalotti, a 29-year-old Bustleton resident, said the restaurant, which will feature both drive-in and inside table service, will employ 70 people, including waitresses in poodle skirts inside and out. "We are still looking for some good skaters," Vassalotti said Wednesday with a smile.
NEWS
September 25, 1994 | By Galina Espinoza INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
In her hand, Edith Warren holds a rich purple sack with gold trim that looks as if it should contain a diamond necklace or Faberge egg. The sack actually holds riches of another sort. As Warren pulls on the drawstring, out spill the most beautiful, deep-burgundy . . . Scrabble tiles. A layperson might scoff, but nothing is more valuable to Scrabble diehards than a good batch of tiles. Vowels such as E, consonants such as S and, especially, blank tiles that can be used as any letter are much coveted.
NEWS
April 12, 1990 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty, Special to The Inquirer
Their Ukrainian-style Easter eggs may not have been as lively or intricate as the real thing, but the women in the egg-decorating class at the Springfield Library gave it their best shot. After all, it's not easy getting the wax to melt, holding the egg still, using the stylus properly and producing artful designs. Then there's that delicate eggshell that breaks without much provocation. Instructor Helena Brasko encouraged the novice egg decorators, who took their dyed eggs to the library Thursday evening for the library's first-ever Ukrainian egg-decorating class.
NEWS
February 8, 1988 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
Once upon a time (for that's how children's stories are supposed to begin) there was a little boy named Robert, and he had a splendid toy boat. No, make that many splendid toy boats. Robert's boats were made of wood or tin, with make-believe smokestacks and windup engines that spun propellers, and like most little boys, Robert used to play with them in the pond on his family's estate. Oops. Don't most kids' families have estates with ponds? Well, no matter. The important thing is that little Robert Forbes did, and when he played with his boats he could pretend that he was a pirate, or an admiral, or a riverboat pilot, or a gunner on a battleship.
NEWS
December 12, 1999 | By Victoria Donohoe, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
The exhibition Unseen Treasures: Imperial Russia and the New World, from the State Historical Museum in Moscow, is an eye-opener, as much as because of what we can read through the lines as what we can see on the walls. The traveling show went on display Thursday, making its American debut at the New Jersey State Museum, its only East Coast venue. Topping the list of surprises in store for visitors are many of the history-laden messages conveyed by this selection of fine and folk art, handcrafted objects and documents.
NEWS
November 29, 1999 | By Al Felzenberg
One need not have been a Bolshevik to have despised the Romanovs. Since their execution 82 years ago, Czar Nicholas II and his wife, German-born princess (and granddaughter of Queen Victoria) and later Czarina Alexandra have been the subject of books, movies and exhibits (last spring's exhibit at Wilmington's First USA Riverfront Arts Center has departed for Mobile, Ala.). Romanticism, jewelry and Faberge eggs! But save for Stalin and Hitler, it would be hard to conceive of a couple who did more to get this violent, war-torn century off on the wrong foot than this couple.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 1989 | By Mary Flannery, Daily News Staff Writer
Imagine a lifesize cafe table and inlaid chair that look good enough to eat. Actually, they could be eaten. For this table and chair are made entirely of chocolate. Dark, rich chocolate, the kind you can never get enough of. And they're decorated with red, yellow, and green gum drops, jelly beans and jelly slices as a visual and tantalizing treat. This sweet display is part of "The Confectioner's Art," a traveling exhibit that opens at the Academy of Natural Sciences on Saturday and remains until Sept.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
November 5, 2000 | By Catherine Quillman, INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
There is still plenty of time to see the blockbuster exhibit of Faberge works at the Riverfront Arts Center here. The exhibit, simply called Faberge, does not close until Feb. 18, 2001. However, take into consideration that this exhibit is billed as the largest showing ever of the works of Russian jeweler and goldsmith Peter Carl Faberge. This is a lot to take in, especially if you see the 10-minute orientation movie and choose to be guided through the many galleries by the free audio tour.
NEWS
September 5, 2000 | by Frank Dougherty, Daily News Staff Writer
The largest exhibition ever of the works of legendary jeweler and goldsmith Peter Carl Faberge opens this Saturday at the Riverfront Arts Center in Wilmington. "The exhibition will feature masterpieces from more than 30 of the world's most prestigious private collections and museums," said James Broughton, president of Broughton International, the firm that assembled the Delaware show. Among the key lenders are the Forbes Magazine collection; two Russian museums, the Hermitage in Saint Petersburg, and the Kremlin Museum in Moscow; and European Royal families, among them items from the collections of King Carl XVI of Sweden, Duke and Duchess of Windsor, and King Ferdinand of Bulgaria.
NEWS
December 12, 1999 | By Victoria Donohoe, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
The exhibition Unseen Treasures: Imperial Russia and the New World, from the State Historical Museum in Moscow, is an eye-opener, as much as because of what we can read through the lines as what we can see on the walls. The traveling show went on display Thursday, making its American debut at the New Jersey State Museum, its only East Coast venue. Topping the list of surprises in store for visitors are many of the history-laden messages conveyed by this selection of fine and folk art, handcrafted objects and documents.
NEWS
November 29, 1999 | By Al Felzenberg
One need not have been a Bolshevik to have despised the Romanovs. Since their execution 82 years ago, Czar Nicholas II and his wife, German-born princess (and granddaughter of Queen Victoria) and later Czarina Alexandra have been the subject of books, movies and exhibits (last spring's exhibit at Wilmington's First USA Riverfront Arts Center has departed for Mobile, Ala.). Romanticism, jewelry and Faberge eggs! But save for Stalin and Hitler, it would be hard to conceive of a couple who did more to get this violent, war-torn century off on the wrong foot than this couple.
NEWS
May 28, 1999 | By Bob Cooney, Daily News Staff Writer
POETIC TWIST Poetry author Nzadi Keita will read from and discuss her work at Robin's Book Store, 108 S. 13th St., at 7 p.m. FRIDAY. The author of the poetry collection "Birthmarks," Keita has written for many journals, including American Poetry Review, River Styk and Long Shot Review. Admission is free. Info: 215-735-9600. LOCAL VOCAL Haverford-based singer Barbara Montgomery will sing her mixture of ballads, blues and up-tempo songs at Rock Lobster, 221 N. Delaware Ave., from 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. FRIDAY.
NEWS
March 4, 1997 | By Steve Goldstein, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Steve Forbes is running again. His travel schedule would make a rock star blanch. His stump speech is as polished as one of the famed Faberge eggs in the family collection. The multimillionaire publisher, who shook up the Republican presidential primary fight for a few months last year with a self-financed campaign, is hitting the hustings, preaching the virtues of a flat-rate income tax and Social Security reform. But this is not about me, Forbes says, sounding curiously like Ross Perot.
NEWS
September 25, 1994 | By Galina Espinoza INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
In her hand, Edith Warren holds a rich purple sack with gold trim that looks as if it should contain a diamond necklace or Faberge egg. The sack actually holds riches of another sort. As Warren pulls on the drawstring, out spill the most beautiful, deep-burgundy . . . Scrabble tiles. A layperson might scoff, but nothing is more valuable to Scrabble diehards than a good batch of tiles. Vowels such as E, consonants such as S and, especially, blank tiles that can be used as any letter are much coveted.
NEWS
June 24, 1990 | By Richard V. Sabatini, Inquirer Staff Writer
If you'd like a waitressing job but really want to be outdoors this summer - a Bustleton restaurateur has a deal for you. Arnold's Drive-In Restaurant, scheduled to open mid-July at Bustleton Avenue and Bleigh Street, is hiring roller-skating car hops and waitresses for its back-to-the-50s style operation. Owner Dan Vassalotti, a 29-year-old Bustleton resident, said the restaurant, which will feature both drive-in and inside table service, will employ 70 people, including waitresses in poodle skirts inside and out. "We are still looking for some good skaters," Vassalotti said Wednesday with a smile.
NEWS
April 12, 1990 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty, Special to The Inquirer
Their Ukrainian-style Easter eggs may not have been as lively or intricate as the real thing, but the women in the egg-decorating class at the Springfield Library gave it their best shot. After all, it's not easy getting the wax to melt, holding the egg still, using the stylus properly and producing artful designs. Then there's that delicate eggshell that breaks without much provocation. Instructor Helena Brasko encouraged the novice egg decorators, who took their dyed eggs to the library Thursday evening for the library's first-ever Ukrainian egg-decorating class.
NEWS
February 26, 1990 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer Contributing to this report were the Los Angeles Times, Reuters and the Associated Press
Crazy? Nah. Eccentric? You bet. Malcolm Stevenson Forbes didn't deny it. He reveled in it. The millionaire publisher, who died of a heart attack on Saturday at 70, was one of America's richest men, yet his eccentric lifestyle enthralled the world even more than his fortune. "You don't have to worry if somebody says, 'Gee, that guy's a nut.' If you have enough money, they say, 'Gee, that guy's eccentric,' " Forbes said recently. Experts have estimated his fortune at between $750 million and $1.25 billion, and his own business magazine ranked him as the 113th richest person in the country.
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