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ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 2014 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
A blue-tinged dog guarded the perimeter of a Bryn Athyn backyard on a warm afternoon in September. Beyond, vats of logwood chips and fermented indigo flowers steeped on the lawn, and swaths of fabric in shades of navy, lavender, and cornflower dried in the sun, draped over drying racks, bushes, and lawn chairs. At the center of this blue streak were Mira Adornetto and Elissa Meyers of BlueRedYellow, Philadelphia's natural-dye house. They were running a "blue" workshop, the first in a tricolor fall series.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 2016 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Fashion Writer
I always assumed the vibrantly printed array of wrap skirts, maxi dresses, and kufis sold at African street fairs like last weekend's Odunde Festival were inspired by fabrics and silhouettes indigenous to the continent. Turns out I was only half right. The styles - iros (wraparound skirts), geles (head wraps), and bubas (loose-fitting blouses) - are native to central and west African countries. But ankara, the striking wax-coated cotton fabric from which the clothing is often fashioned, traces its heritage to the Netherlands.
NEWS
June 22, 1989 | By Peggy L. Salvatore, Special to The Inquirer
In a late-1960s trend toward loosening the rules about technique at the Rhode Island School of Design, professors encouraged student sculptor Kay Ritter, formerly of Levittown, to be free. She was. "It was a very strange time. I wasn't getting technique, so I fell back on something I did in childhood," she said of her "fabric mache," nearly life- sized, caricatures. However, when her teachers saw the result of Ritter's imagination they disapproved, and in an artistic difference of opinion she left the school in 1971 after three years.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 22, 2012 | By Lini S. Kadaba, For The Inquirer
For years, Ivy Gilbert cringed at the pile of crumpled wrapping paper, bows, and ribbon in the middle of the living room after birthdays, Hanukkah, or other gift-giving occasions. All of it was destined for a landfill. "There was just this bag of trash," said the writer and mother of two, who lives in South Philadelphia near the former Graduate Hospital. "It bothered me profoundly. " In the United States, annual trash from gift wrap and shopping bags totals four million tons, according to RecycleWorks.
LIVING
August 12, 2005 | By Claire Whitcomb FOR THE INQUIRER
If you want curtains for the Oval Office or wallpaper for the White House's Blue Room, you might call the venerable fabric house Brunschwig & Fils. But if you want wonderful tales about decorating, sit down with Murray Douglas, Brunschwig's taste-maker for the last 50 years and coauthor, with Chippy Irvine, of the new decorating book Brunschwig & Fils Up Close (Bulfinch, $50). "I remember when my Aunt Zelina took me to see a French woman who'd done her drawing room up entirely in black-and-white chintz," Douglas recalls.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 2000 | By Edward J. Sozanski, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Snyderman-Works Galleries are responsible for the most impressive of the half-dozen or so fiber-art exhibitions around town this month. Organized by director Bruce Hoffman, this museum-quality presentation of international scope reconnoiters the front lines of fiber art through the work of 48 artists. Judging by the approximately 130 pieces that Hoffman has selected, the exhibition affirms that fiber art has long outgrown its traditional boundaries of weaving, needlework, basketry and papermaking.
NEWS
January 20, 2013 | By Edith Newhall, For The Inquirer
Previously best known for his entertaining YouTube skewerings of the art world, "Art Thoughtz With Hennessy Youngman," Jayson Musson, now having his first show with Fleisher/Ollman Gallery, has since become an official member of that sector. He's been cutting up Coogi sweaters (the colorful patterned cotton knitwear sported by Bill Cosby on The Cosby Show and more recently by various rappers) into strips of fabric that he assembles and stitches into patterns of his own. Pulled over stretchers, the finished tapestrylike works look as though they must be based on particular paintings, and their titles hint at such connections, but Musson's fabric manipulations are so subtle it's difficult to pinpoint specific forebears.
NEWS
September 11, 1995 | By Jennifer Wing, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Embroidered fireworks burst in a riot of color across the midnight background, spraying brush-stroked sparks near the hand-stitched railroad tunnel. Exploding from that first eye-catching scene is a collage of portraits depicting bundled-up children dodging snowballs and shoppers strolling by Haverford Avenue's five-and-dime store and movie theater. This mosaic of daily life, in the form of a 7-by-8-foot quilt, took 11 local women more than a year and a half to sew, paint and applique.
NEWS
June 26, 1988 | Karen Heller, Inquirer Staff Writer
There is Jack Lenor Larsen fabric in the Philadelphia Museum of Art, and in a Braniff 747 as well. He has designed affordable sheets for mass consumption and leather custom interiors for Eleanor Clay (Mrs. Edsel) Ford's Palm Beach, Fla., convertibles. This is as Larsen would have his business; beautiful designs for everyone. "We have not yet resolved design for an egalitarian lifestyle," says Larsen, one of the country's pre-eminent fabric designers and a recent visitor to Philadelphia.
LIVING
November 29, 1996 | By Dylan Landis, FOR THE INQUIRER
Beneath its two-story-high cathedral ceiling, Jack Lenor Larsen's living room in Long Island, N.Y., could have seemed too vast for comfort. Instead, it's almost intimate because Larsen upholstered the entire space, straight to the ceiling's peak, with straw-colored Egyptian damask. Interior designer Marjorie Shushan also grappled with visually cool surroundings: a Manhattan apartment with white-box rooms and no distinguishing architecture. To give the place character, she assembled an orchestra of textures: silk taffeta on the sofas, antique tapestry on the ottomans, 18th-century embroidery on the pillows.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 2016 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Fashion Writer
I always assumed the vibrantly printed array of wrap skirts, maxi dresses, and kufis sold at African street fairs like last weekend's Odunde Festival were inspired by fabrics and silhouettes indigenous to the continent. Turns out I was only half right. The styles - iros (wraparound skirts), geles (head wraps), and bubas (loose-fitting blouses) - are native to central and west African countries. But ankara, the striking wax-coated cotton fabric from which the clothing is often fashioned, traces its heritage to the Netherlands.
NEWS
May 8, 2016
Ally Through July 31 at the Fabric Workshop and Museum, 1214 Arch St. Performances of "Rope Dance," "Paper Dance," and "The Courtesan and the Crone" on selected dates only. Hours: 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Friday; noon to 5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Admission: Free. (All tickets for "Rope Dance" claimed.) Information: 215-561-8888 or fabricworkshopandmuseum.org
NEWS
May 8, 2016 | Thomas Hine, for The Inquirer
There is one joyous moment in the Fabric Workshop and Museum's current exhibition, "Ally," and it is about someone else's joy. It is a video, projected on a very large screen, showing the face of dancer-choreographer Anna Halprin as she watches a performance of Rope Dance, a work she created for this exhibition, in collaboration with sculptor Janine Antoni and choreographer Stephen Petronio. Halprin, who is 95, has a deeply lined face, and as she reacts to the dance, you can see where every wrinkle came from - some to express surprise, others to show concern, curiosity, amusement, elation, pride, and a flow of other emotions.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 2016 | By Stephan Salisbury, Staff Writer
A portion of Marion Boulton "Kippy" Stroud's art collection, including four Georgia O'Keeffe paintings, will be sold at auction in the coming months to help fund the Fabric Workshop and Museum, the contemporary art institution Stroud founded in 1977. Stroud, who died in August, was the seemingly indefatigable force behind the Fabric Workshop, directing operations, formulating artistic plans, and helping secure funding for its ambitious exhibitions and programs. Over the decades, artists have been invited to spend time there creating everything from ties to massive installations; they have participated in collaborative projects; and they have been enticed, Stroud once said, "to explore, to take liberties.
BUSINESS
April 2, 2016 | By Jonathan Takiff, Staff Writer
Philadelphia universities already deep into research on smart fabrics and wearable technology will earn a major boost from the Department of Defense on Friday that could jump-start the next big things in "smart wear" for health, security, communications, energy, and fashion. Holding court Friday morning at MIT, Secretary of Defense Ashton Carter is announcing $75 million in funding for the Advanced Functional Fabrics of America, a nonprofit billed as "a revolutionary fibers and textiles manufacturing innovation institute.
NEWS
January 22, 2016 | Stephan Salisbury, Culture Writer
Susan Lubowsky Talbott, who retired in December after eight years as head of the venerable Wadsworth Atheneum in Hartford, Conn., has agreed to take the reins of Philadelphia's Fabric Workshop and Museum for at least the next year. She will guide the contemporary art institution during "our current transition," said president Katherine Sokolnikoff, and facilitate two large projects in the spring and fall. The Fabric Workshop (FWM) was stunned in August by the death of its founder and director, Marion "Kippy" Boulton Stroud, 76, who took her own life.
TRAVEL
January 18, 2016
Cellphone wallet cases let you carry some credit cards or IDs in integrated slots, while, ideally, providing impact protection for the phone. But what if you love those super-tough cases you've come to trust - few of which include storage space? Just stick on a Sinjimoru Sinji Pouch, and you're good to go. Slightly larger than a credit card, the kangarooesque pouch is made of a bounce-back elastic fabric attached to a hard sueded backing that sticks to the back of your phone case (or the phone itself)
NEWS
November 21, 2015 | By Matt Gelb, Inquirer Staff Writer
The name of a Fabric Row mainstay, faded on its storefront window, is hidden behind a red banner that blares: "Retirement Sale Everything 1/2 Off. " Marmelstein's, in business since 1919, started with an immigrant's door-to-door needle-and-thread sales from his knapsack. After 96 years, its last day is Saturday. Shoppers now roam South Fourth Street for the designer boutique, the hair salon, the bike shop, and the artisan studio that have reshaped a neighborhood once defined by textiles.
NEWS
November 9, 2015 | By Edith Newhall, For The Inquirer
Philadelphia's venerable Print Center is celebrating its centennial anniversary through December with exhibitions, events, programs, and projects on its own premises and elsewhere (it has partnered with more than 40 organizations in Philadelphia and beyond), all of which are listed on its website and in a guidebook available at the Print Center. The best place to start is the Print Center itself. On the first floor, "Highlights in History" documents the center's activities from its beginnings as a club to its current status as a nonprofit organization with an international voice in printmaking and photography.
NEWS
September 28, 2015 | By Edith Newhall, For The Inquirer
On first impression, David Noonan's silk-screened linen collages mounted on wooden supports project an aura of formality and stillness on the crisp white walls of UArts' Rosenwald-Wolf Gallery. A closer look reveals something else altogether: These icily elegant, tidily constructed works are embodiments of taboo avant-garde performances, brimming with erotic overtones. For many of these works, Noonan appropriated archival photographic images of Japanese Butoh dancers, which he then cropped and enlarged and silk-screened onto glued-together patches of linen and jute.
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