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NEWS
November 20, 2009
The 75-year-old Dad Vail Regatta hasn't always been held in Philadelphia, but since 1953, the Schuylkill has been its home, and that's where it belongs. Unfortunately, next May the Dad Vail crews will be rowing their boats down the Navesink in North Jersey. That's where the tony town of Rumson outbid Philadelphia to host the races. Except the event wasn't actually put up for bids. Rumson instead waved $250,000 under the noses of the Dad Vail's organizers and they grabbed it. Philadelphia officials say they didn't hear about the deal until it was done.
LIVING
July 24, 2009 | By Nayeli Rodriguez INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sean Gutekunst is rambunctious on the playground, like many 6-year-olds. He enjoys attending band practice with his father, playing piano, and being in the Cub Scouts, but he has an unusual hobby - quilting. Sean learned through his grandmother, Linda Dougherty, an experienced quilter who has made this American tradition a tradition for her family. "I started in the 1970s, there was a resurgence of quilting during the bicentennial," says Dougherty. "Since then, quilting has always been a way of exposing my children and grandchildren to sewing.
LIVING
June 5, 2009 | By Sally Friedman FOR THE INQUIRER
It was a case of despair at first sight. Back in 1968, when Nancy Bergman first saw the house on Locust Street near 22d, she was totally turned off. While Bergman, her husband, and their three children had outgrown their apartment just a stone's throw away, they lived in a light-filled, interesting space. Everything inside the Locust Street house her husband took her to see was painted dark green or carpeted in green. The exterior bricks were painted black. "It was just totally uninviting," recalls Nancy.
NEWS
September 6, 2008
Stitch. You don't need a huge tent and a zillion-dollar production for a wow! moment. Proof is at the Philadelphia School of Circus Arts in Germantown, where two impossibly graceful athletes offer 45 minutes of striking circus work - elaborate dancing in midair, dangerous balancing, unreal body-bending, aerial fabric work, and just about anything on stilts. Laura Stokes is like an otherworldly insect in her ceiling-level contortions with fabric. On the floor, she stands on one foot and rests her chin on the toes of the other.
LIVING
August 29, 2008 | By Karla Klein Albertson FOR THE INQUIRER
Hard-fought presidential campaigns are nothing new. But if you prefer political history to current events, "Patchwork Politics: From George to George W. " is a must-see alternative to all the convention coverage. The exhibit at the Heritage Center Museum in Lancaster features a large private collection of politically themed quilts, textiles and memorabilia. "The quilts range from a George Washington piece down to examples with Nixon and Clinton, and there are a number of wonderful quilts in between," says Julie Powell, a quilt historian who is guest curator.
SPORTS
August 6, 2008 | Daily News Wire Services
The lawyer for the man accused of shooting three people after a strip club melee involving NFL player Adam Jones alleged yesterday that Jones "completely fabricated" the story that led to the man's arrest. "This entire case rests upon the statement of Adam 'Pacman' Jones," lawyer Jeffrey Segal told the judge who heard Arvin Kenti Edwards plead not guilty to charges that could put him in prison for the rest of his life. "Pacman Jones' story is completely fabricated," Segal said outside court.
LIVING
July 11, 2008 | By Virginia A. Smith INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Unlike most people, gardeners love rain. It's no spoiler - just the opposite. Rain is life-giving. It's also welcome relief from a chore most of us dislike only slightly less than weeding: Hose-dragging is truly a drag. There are other reasons Jeff Player, Jackie Umphlet and Rachelle Aquilla try to conserve water in their gardens, in such diverse locales as South Jersey, central Montgomery County, and Philadelphia: They want to save money, and the planet. But saving water rarely hits the popular radar without a dry spell or drought.
NEWS
July 11, 2008 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Unlike most people, gardeners love rain. It's no spoiler - just the opposite. Rain is life-giving. It's also welcome relief from a chore most of us dislike only slightly less than weeding: Hose-dragging is truly a drag. There are other reasons Jeff Player, Jackie Umphlet and Rachelle Aquilla try to conserve water in their gardens, in such diverse locales as South Jersey, central Montgomery County, and Philadelphia: They want to save money, and the planet. But saving water rarely hits the popular radar without a dry spell or drought.
NEWS
July 6, 2008 | By Nancy Petersen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For decades, George Washington's tent anchored the visitors' center at Valley Forge National Historical Park. Not only did its monumental size dwarf all the other relics in the room, but its very presence could be mesmerizing as visitors imagined Washington huddled inside with his advisers during the harsh Valley Forge winter. "I would compare it to standing in the room at Independence Hall where they drafted the Declaration of Independence," said Don Naimoli, president of the Friends of Valley Forge Park.
NEWS
May 4, 2008 | By A.D. Amorosi FOR THE INQUIRER
On a windy Saturday in Ardmore, a crowd of gentlemen poke around Centofanti's Custom Tailors. The packed house isn't unusual for the Station Avenue salon, which has been there for 51 years. Closing time is 1 p.m. on this day. While some gents try on the fruits of Centofanti's labor - custom pattern-crafted cut suits costing upward of $2,500 - others look at swatches of fine Italian cashmere or dashing British wool. There's a handful of tailors around the room, older gents like Luigi Russo, peering deep into their fabric like a hawk gazing at its prey.
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