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NEWS
July 12, 2008 | By SOLOMON JONES
I'M TRYING TO be down with the whole social networking thing, so I recently joined Facebook. I mean, if I'm going to make a living as an all-around communicator, I clearly need more than just a Web site. I need the kind of Internet mojo that comes with having a profile in every available online community. I have sacrificed greatly to fulfill that need. I sat on my hands when an 18-year-old dressed in Ninja pajamas called me a "wannabe journalist" on MySpace. I repeatedly deleted dirty pictures some nasty girl kept posting on my Blackplanet guestbook.
NEWS
February 15, 2009 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's called "25 Random Things About Me. " It lives on Facebook, the popular social-networking Web site. It's a list you fill with 25 items of personal information, ranging from the trivial to the intimate. Trivial: "I hate tuna. " Personal: "Part of me hasn't grown past the moment of my father's death. " Intimate: "I have been unfaithful, but so far it hasn't mattered much. " You send your "25 Random Things" chain-letter-style to 25 friends, and they fill it out and tag 25 others, and . . . And soon Facebook - a virtual living room where people hang out and tell everyone else what they're doing and thinking - is awash with personal revelations, admissions, info once kept private.
NEWS
January 29, 2012
PhillyStage facebook.com/PhilllyStage PopLife facebook.com/PopLifeinq Arts facebook.com/InqArts Restaurants and Food facebook.com/PhillyFood
NEWS
July 12, 2010 | By Carolyn Davis, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ken Savage's marriage already was strained, but the first sign that something was egregiously, electronically wrong came a year and a half ago, when his wife started taking her laptop into a different room to check Facebook. Once, Savage walked in on her. She asked, startled, "What are you doing?" and shut the laptop with a thump. The better question was: What was she doing? Savage, 38, a computer guy, eventually tracked his wife's Facebook posts and chats to discover she had reconnected with a former boyfriend on the popular social-networking website and arranged a Saturday tryst in a hotel.
NEWS
June 7, 2011
BERLIN - Better check your Facebook settings before posting a party invitation online. A teenage girl in Germany who forgot to mark her birthday invitation as private on Facebook fled her own party when more than 1,500 guests showed up and around 100 police officers, some on horses, were needed to keep the crowd under control. Eleven people were temporarily detained, one police officer was injured, dozens of girls wearing flip-flops cut their feet on broken glass and firefighters had to extinguish two small fires at the 16th birthday party in Hamburg, police spokesman Mirko Streiber said Sunday.
NEWS
May 23, 2012 | By Steven L. Johnson
With a $16 billion IPO behind it and its billionth user on the horizon, Facebook has made it hard to imagine a world without it. Yet the technology industry is notorious for booms and busts. Can you remember the last time you fired up a Netscape browser, visited a GeoCities website, or invited a friend to join AOL Instant Messenger? I'm convinced that Facebook is as doomed to fail as those ventures. To remain vibrant and relevant, Facebook must overcome daunting challenges. Unless it can deftly incorporate future waves of innovation, it faces the fate of other once-successful technology companies: death.
BUSINESS
May 26, 2012 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Staff Writer
Facebook's share price climbed more than a dollar Thursday, rising above $33, but the sharp drop since last week's high-profile initial public offering continued to cause headaches for the social-networking company, its Wall Street underwriters, and investors. Even brokerages and the NASDAQ stock exchange — blamed for long delays last Friday, the first day the stock was openly traded — are suffering fallout. Facebook and a group of early investors who chose to cash out received more than $16 billion last week from IPO participants who bought shares for the opening $38 price.
NEWS
October 12, 2006 | By Mark Franek
You may not know Mark Zuckerberg, but if you have children between the ages of 14 and 24, there is pretty good chance that they do. Three years ago, while a sophomore at Harvard, Zuckerberg cooked up the idea for Facebook.com, a social-networking site on the Internet that allows users to join groups based on their school affiliations and post information about themselves and their activities. You can "poke" a stranger and become his or her "friend," thereby expanding your circle of acquaintances beyond your dorm room, to the campus as a whole, even to campuses across America.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 2009 | By HOWARD GENSLER Daily News wire services contributed to this report
TATTLE IS often a column featuring cautionary tales, usually involving celebrities. But occasionally we come across a story in which there is such an important lesson to be learned, for the good of our readers we feel compelled to bring it to you even if it does not involve someone from "The Hills" or a curvy Kardashian. According to News of the World, Brit Dominic Baronet, 26, is a Facebook menace. Do not "friend" Dominic, ladies, although it's unlikely he could scrape together the cash to cross the pond.
BUSINESS
January 19, 2012 | By Mike Swift, SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS
In country after country, Facebook is toppling the incumbent local social network in what seems like an unstoppable march to global dominance. After overtaking Microsoft's Windows Live Profile in Portugal and Mexico in early 2010, Facebook eclipsed StudiVZ in Germany and Google's Orkut in India later that year, and soon unseated Hyves in the Netherlands, according to the metrics firm comScore. Now Facebook is poised to triumph in what has been viewed as its ultimate popularity contest, with comScore indicating the network is likely to dethrone Orkut in social-media-mad Brazil when its December data are released.
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NEWS
June 3, 2015 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a closely watched case testing the limits of free speech, the U.S. Supreme Court on Monday overturned the Philadelphia federal court conviction in 2011 of an Allentown-area man for threatening on his Facebook page to kill his estranged wife and an FBI agent. The case has drawn national attention, in part because of its potential to define how the government can prosecute violent statements made on social media and on the Internet. Writing for the majority, Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. said prosecutors must show that defendants knowingly intended in their threatening statements to issue a real threat in order to secure a conviction.
NEWS
May 28, 2015 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pennsylvania State University will shut down - for three years - the fraternity whose members allegedly posted pictures of nude and partly nude women on private Facebook pages, the school said Tuesday night. President Eric Barron said the university decided against a recommendation from the student-led Interfraternity Council, the body that governs Greek life on campus, for less severe sanctions against Kappa Delta Rho. The university, which has completed its investigation, found evidence of hazing, use and sale of drugs, underage drinking, sexual misconduct and harassment, and "exploitation in terms of photographs," Barron said.
NEWS
March 20, 2015 | By Susan Snyder and Erin McCarthy, Inquirer Staff Writers
Update : Penn State President Eric Barron said Friday the Kappa Delta Rho case "brings us to a point where we must ask if a reevaluation of the fraternity system is required. " He added: "Some members of the university senior leadership believe it is, and we are considering our options. "  This story is still developing and no other details are available yet. Earlier story: Pennsylvania State University fraternity brothers who posted pictures of nude or partly nude women on a private Facebook page could be charged under a state law, known commonly as the "revenge porn" law, that went into effect in September.
NEWS
March 19, 2015 | BY WENDY RUDERMAN, Daily News Staff Writer rudermw@phillynews.com, 215-854-5924
COUNCIL CANDIDATE Manny Morales yesterday said he never posted hateful rants against blacks, immigrants, women, gays and welfare recipients on his Facebook page. His page was hacked, Morales said, and he thinks Councilwoman Maria Quinones-Sanchez, or someone connected to her campaign, did it. Sanchez called Morales' accusation "absurd. " On Monday, the councilwoman released a string of bigoted Facebook posts allegedly penned by Morales over a five-year period. "All of this has never been posted by me," Morales said yesterday in a phone interview.
NEWS
March 19, 2015 | By Susan Snyder and Erin McCarthy, Inquirer Staff Writers
Pennsylvania State University finds itself at the center of another scandal with sexual overtones as police investigate allegations that members of a fraternity posted pictures of nude women, some of whom appeared to be sleeping or passed out, on private Facebook pages. The Penn State chapter of Kappa Delta Rho has been suspended for one year by its national office in the wake of the allegations and ongoing investigation, the national organization announced Tuesday afternoon. A former member of Kappa Delta Rho tipped off police to two invitation-only Facebook pages in January, according to an affidavit of probable cause filed by police in State College.
NEWS
March 18, 2015 | BY MENSAH M. DEAN & WENDY RUDERMAN, Daily News Staff Writers deanm@phillynews.com, 215-854-4172
THE UGLY RACE for the 7th District City Council seat got uglier yesterday after incumbent Councilwoman Maria Quinones-Sanchez launched an Internet site about her Democratic primary opponent, Manny Morales, featuring dozens of his alleged Facebook posts critical of traditional Democratic positions and constituencies. Sanchez said the alleged Facebook comments - which she released on a site called MeetMannyMorales.com - expose him as a tea-party-leaning, anti-black, anti-gay, anti-immigrant bigot.
NEWS
March 18, 2015 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia City Councilwoman María Quiñones Sánchez has asked the Democratic Party to withdraw its support of her challenger in the May primary because of posts on his Facebook page that she says are racist, misogynistic, and against Democratic values. The Inquirer reviewed Emanuel "Manny" Morales' Facebook page Monday and found some posts that could be considered objectionable. One was a photo comparing a black man jaywalking to an animal using an overhead walkway that included this comment said to be from Morales: "This shows who is an animal?
NEWS
December 26, 2014 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Central Bucks School District guidance counselor will not face criminal charges over a Facebook post in which she said she would shoot "die-in" protesters at an Eagles game, the Montgomery County District Attorney said Wednesday. In a statement, D.A. Risa Vetri Ferman said the Dec. 7 post "was inappropriate and ill-advised," but "not made with the requisite criminal intent to terrorize, alarm, harass, annoy, or otherwise cause a serious public inconvenience. " The post by Marykate Blankenburg, a guidance counselor in Central Bucks who lives in Upper Gwynedd, said: "If my child cannot get to the Eagles game due to protesters, I will personally SHOOT every one of them.
NEWS
December 20, 2014 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Philadelphia Fire Department paramedic has apologized for posting on Instagram a photo of two black men pointing handguns at a white police officer under the caption: "Our real enemy. " Paramedic Marcell Salters continued from there: ". . . need 2 stop pointing guns at each other & at the ones that's legally killing innocents. " Mayor Nutter on Thursday said he condemned the behavior "in the strongest possible terms," calling its message "reprehensible. " "We celebrate the exercise of our First Amendment right to expression," Nutter said, "but there are clear limits, and this posting went far beyond standards of decency.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 2014 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
The hostage crisis at the Lindt Chocolat Cafe in Sydney, Australia, unfolded in a way impossible a decade ago. Much of it played out on Facebook and text messaging (already there as of 2004), and on YouTube, Twitter, and other social media as yet unborn in 2004. To be a hostage-taker or hostage as of 2014, it seems, you need good social-media skills. "There's an unprecedented degree of immediacy to such crises now," says Lawrence Husick, senior fellow at the Foreign Policy Research Institute and codirector for the Center for the Study of Terrorism.
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