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NEWS
March 18, 2015 | BY MENSAH M. DEAN & WENDY RUDERMAN, Daily News Staff Writers deanm@phillynews.com, 215-854-4172
THE UGLY RACE for the 7th District City Council seat got uglier yesterday after incumbent Councilwoman Maria Quinones-Sanchez launched an Internet site about her Democratic primary opponent, Manny Morales, featuring dozens of his alleged Facebook posts critical of traditional Democratic positions and constituencies. Sanchez said the alleged Facebook comments - which she released on a site called MeetMannyMorales.com - expose him as a tea-party-leaning, anti-black, anti-gay, anti-immigrant bigot.
NEWS
March 18, 2015 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia City Councilwoman María Quiñones Sánchez has asked the Democratic Party to withdraw its support of her challenger in the May primary because of posts on his Facebook page that she says are racist, misogynistic, and against Democratic values. The Inquirer reviewed Emanuel "Manny" Morales' Facebook page Monday and found some posts that could be considered objectionable. One was a photo comparing a black man jaywalking to an animal using an overhead walkway that included this comment said to be from Morales: "This shows who is an animal?
NEWS
December 26, 2014 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Central Bucks School District guidance counselor will not face criminal charges over a Facebook post in which she said she would shoot "die-in" protesters at an Eagles game, the Montgomery County District Attorney said Wednesday. In a statement, D.A. Risa Vetri Ferman said the Dec. 7 post "was inappropriate and ill-advised," but "not made with the requisite criminal intent to terrorize, alarm, harass, annoy, or otherwise cause a serious public inconvenience. " The post by Marykate Blankenburg, a guidance counselor in Central Bucks who lives in Upper Gwynedd, said: "If my child cannot get to the Eagles game due to protesters, I will personally SHOOT every one of them.
NEWS
December 20, 2014 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Philadelphia Fire Department paramedic has apologized for posting on Instagram a photo of two black men pointing handguns at a white police officer under the caption: "Our real enemy. " Paramedic Marcell Salters continued from there: ". . . need 2 stop pointing guns at each other & at the ones that's legally killing innocents. " Mayor Nutter on Thursday said he condemned the behavior "in the strongest possible terms," calling its message "reprehensible. " "We celebrate the exercise of our First Amendment right to expression," Nutter said, "but there are clear limits, and this posting went far beyond standards of decency.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 2014 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
The hostage crisis at the Lindt Chocolat Cafe in Sydney, Australia, unfolded in a way impossible a decade ago. Much of it played out on Facebook and text messaging (already there as of 2004), and on YouTube, Twitter, and other social media as yet unborn in 2004. To be a hostage-taker or hostage as of 2014, it seems, you need good social-media skills. "There's an unprecedented degree of immediacy to such crises now," says Lawrence Husick, senior fellow at the Foreign Policy Research Institute and codirector for the Center for the Study of Terrorism.
NEWS
December 4, 2014
I REALLY HAD NO intention of writing about this ever again. I'd said most of what I needed to say in print, on Facebook, on the radio and on television, and was getting tired of going around in circles about the phrase "statute of limitations. " There were other things to think about during my birthday week, like how many Starbucks gift cards I was likely to get and whether actually asking for a bottle of Sambuca with a bow on it was declasse. But then, someone said something that, like a red flag in the face of a bespectacled 5-foot-1-inch bull, made the steam flow.
NEWS
December 3, 2014 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
WASHINGTON - In a case that could further define the limits of free speech online, the Supreme Court heard arguments Monday in the appeal by an Allentown man who claimed First Amendment protection following his arrest for threatening on Facebook to kill his wife and an FBI agent. A U.S. District Court jury sitting in Philadelphia convicted Anthony Elonis in 2011 of violating a federal law barring threats over the Internet, mail, or telecommunications systems. Elonis claimed that his posts were a means of self-expression and that he was entitled to the same license employed by rap musicians using violent images in their recordings.
BUSINESS
October 6, 2014 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
Oh, golly, yes, social media have changed the face of retirement. " So says Donna Held, 61, of Salisbury Township. She is retired and a big proponent of social media. Like Held, an increasing proportion of retired people use social media for connection, support, education, even business (call it "retirement lite"). "It sure has changed retirement," says Howard Levin, 85, of Cherry Hill. "Of course, it can become addictive - not a big problem if you're retired. " For more and more seniors it offers, in the words of Judy Shepps Battle, 71, of Kendall Park, N.J., "an experience that just wasn't there before.
NEWS
October 6, 2014 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Staff Writer
Is Albert Whitehead a compulsive critic seeking revenge against Sundance Vacations for an old slight, a man who deserves to be summoned repeatedly to Luzerne County for legal proceedings, have his e-mail records subpoenaed, and pay $12,991 toward Sundance's legal costs to shut him up - or go to jail if he can't? Or is Whitehead a selfless whistle-blower suffering because he can't afford to counter Sundance's lawyers - a man unfairly in the crosshairs of the Wilkes-Barre lodging-package marketer, which he says uses legal loopholes to lock unwitting customers into costly, long-term contracts?
NEWS
September 22, 2014 | By Laura McCrystal, Inquirer Staff Writer
It is the biggest municipal project ever in Haverford Township, and in a town with a history of contentious politics, it already has broken new ground - in acrimony. A $23.5 million plan approved last week calls for constructing a new municipal building and police station and renovating or rebuilding the library. Officials in the Delaware County township say it is long overdue. But the project, which is expected to increase real estate taxes by more than 5 percent, or about $55 per household, has also been a source of heated debate.
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