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Factory Orders

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BUSINESS
October 4, 1989 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Orders to U.S. factories for manufactured goods rose 2.9 percent in August, the government said yesterday, but nearly half of the gain came from a one- month boost in automobile orders. The Commerce Department reported that orders for durable and nondurable goods totaled a seasonally adjusted $237.2 billion, the bigest increase in four months. Factory orders declined 2 percent in July to $230.5 billion, the lowest level since last November, after having risen 0.6 percent in June.
BUSINESS
August 3, 1990 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Orders for goods made by the nation's factories fell 1.5 percent in June, the government said yesterday in a report that analysts said confirmed that the manufacturing sector was not doing well. The Commerce Department reported that orders fell to a seasonally adjusted $237.4 billion in June, with the sharpest drop coming in defense hardware such as military aircraft. The drop was steeper than expected by economists, who had forecast a 1 percent decline. Orders rose 2.2 percent in May, the department said, revising its previous report of a 2.1 percent gain.
BUSINESS
March 5, 1987 | From Inquirer Wire Services
New orders to U.S. factories suffered their sharpest slump in more than 6 1/2 years in January as the effect of tax overhaul continued to be felt on the American economy. Orders fell 4 percent to $194.46 billion, the largest drop since May 1980, and would have been down an even larger 5.2 percent except for a 49.7 percent pickup in orders for defense goods, the Commerce Department reported yesterday. The decline in January amounted to $8.16 billion from December, when orders had risen 1.6 percent.
NEWS
July 2, 2008 | By Martin Crutsinger, ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON - Orders to U.S. factories turned in the weakest performance in three months in May, reflecting slumping demand for autos, heavy machinery and steel. The Commerce Department reported today that factory orders rose by 0.6 percent in May, less than half the gains turned in during April and March. It was the poorest showing since factory orders had fallen by 0.4 percent in February. The May performance was in line with expectations. Economists are watching to see how big an impact the overall economic slowdown will have on manufacturing, which has been hurt by troubles in the auto industry and housing-related industries.
BUSINESS
March 7, 1990 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Orders received by the nation's factories for manufactured goods fell in January at the steepest rate in more than 15 years, the Commerce Department said yesterday. The report reflected a slump in the nation's manufacturing sector. Analysts said the 5.4 percent drop was temporary and confined to a comparatively small sector of the economy. Factory orders in the month fell to a seasonally adjusted $227.7 billion, primarily because of a sharp drop in transportation orders. "This is consistent with a picture of definite economic sluggishness," said Cynthia Latta, senior economist with DRI/McGraw Hill Inc. in Lexington, Mass.
BUSINESS
June 3, 1987 | From Inquirer Wire Services
The pace of new orders for manufactured goods weakened in April and worker productivity slackened, the government said yesterday. The Commerce Department said factory orders were up a minimal 0.2 percent in April to a seasonally adjusted $199.8 billion, with new orders for expensive durable goods like cars and heavy appliances showing no growth at all. The slump followed a 2.6 percent rise in orders in March. Excluding the volatile military-goods category, factory orders fell 0.2 percent in April after a 1.1 percent March increase, possibly foreshadowing fewer job opportunities later this year.
BUSINESS
May 1, 1987 | From Inquirer Wire Services
A continuing rise in defense goods orders helped push the overall orders total for U.S. manufacturers up 2.3 percent in March in another sign of modest economic expansion. The Commerce Department yesterday said that the orders totaled a record $198.9 billion and came after a 4.1 percent rise in orders in February. The previous high of $197.15 billion was set in December 1985. The strength in both February and March was heavily influenced by a surge in demand for military equipment.
BUSINESS
August 24, 1991 | From Inquirer Wire Services
The government yesterday reported a surge in factory orders for durable goods in July, reinforcing hopes that the economy is finally out of the recession and triggering a strong rally in the stock market. Orders soared 10.7 percent in July, the biggest monthly gain in almost 21 years, as sharp gains in the often-volatile aircraft and automobile industries led a broad-based advance, the Commerce Department said. Durable goods are costly products expected to last at least three years.
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BUSINESS
December 6, 2012 | By Steve Rothwell, Associated Press
NEW YORK - Stocks closed higher Wednesday, their first gain of the week, as bank shares rose and comments from President Obama made investors optimistic that a quick deal could be made to avoid the fiscal cliff. The Dow Jones industrial average rose 82.71 points to end at 13,034.49. It had been up as much as 137. The Standard & Poor's 500 closed up 2.23 points at 1,409.28. The Nasdaq composite was down 22.99 points to 2,973.70, held back by a slump in Apple. Citigroup jumped $2.17, or 6.3 percent, to $36.46 after the bank said it planned to eliminate more than 11,000 jobs, about 4 percent of its workforce, to cut expenses and improve efficiency.
NEWS
August 31, 2011 | By Chip Cutter, ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK - The stock market is having a strong end to a wild month. The Dow Jones industrial average turned positive for the year Wednesday after a surge in factory orders reassured investors that the manufacturing industry is still healthy. Industrial and raw materials companies had the biggest gains. Factory orders rose 2.4 percent in July, the largest increase since March. Demand for cars jumped the most in eight years, and orders for commercial airplanes soared. Orders fell 0.8 percent in June.
BUSINESS
April 1, 2011 | By Francesca Levy and Matthew Craft, Associated Press
NEW YORK - The Dow Jones industrial average closed its best start to the year since 1999 Thursday, rising 6.4 percent in the first three months. The index of 30 large companies gained 742 points in that stretch. Measured against other first quarters, that is the largest point gain since 1998 and the second best on record. Stocks ended the day mixed as the price of oil jumped to a 30-month high. Slightly disappointing reports on unemployment claims and factory orders also weighed on the market.
NEWS
October 19, 2008 | By Robert B. Reich
Both presidential candidates have been criticized for failing to name any promises or plans they're going to have to scrap because of the bailout and the failing economy. That criticism is unwarranted. The assumption that we are about to have a rerun of 1993 - when Bill Clinton, newly installed as president, was forced to jettison much of his agenda because of a surging budget deficit - may well be mistaken. At first glance, January 2009 is starting to look a lot like January 1993.
NEWS
July 2, 2008 | By Martin Crutsinger, ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON - Orders to U.S. factories turned in the weakest performance in three months in May, reflecting slumping demand for autos, heavy machinery and steel. The Commerce Department reported today that factory orders rose by 0.6 percent in May, less than half the gains turned in during April and March. It was the poorest showing since factory orders had fallen by 0.4 percent in February. The May performance was in line with expectations. Economists are watching to see how big an impact the overall economic slowdown will have on manufacturing, which has been hurt by troubles in the auto industry and housing-related industries.
BUSINESS
December 24, 2004 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Yesterday's economic news was both busy and contradictory. Reports showed that consumers' spending was disappointing in November, but their confidence was rising - and housing sales plummeted, but factory orders soared. Finally, new claims for unemployment benefits rose by slightly more than expected. The day's batch of economic reports, though sending mixed signals, painted a picture of a modestly growing economy, analysts said. "Tie a bow around it - I'll take it home," said Ken Mayland, president of ClearView Economics, in Pepper Pike, Ohio.
BUSINESS
July 4, 2002 | INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
The vast U.S. service sector grew for a fifth straight month in June, but at a slower pace, while May factory orders rose more than expected, two reports showed yesterday, suggesting it may take longer for the economy to fire on all cylinders. That was underscored by a mixed picture for the labor market, following news that service-sector layoffs accelerated in June even as new jobless claims hit a 15-month low in the latest week. That raised concerns that the June employment report, expected tomorrow, could show weaker payroll growth than many have expected.
BUSINESS
February 28, 2001 | By Ken Moritsugu INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Plunges in three indicators suggested yesterday that the U.S. economy has slowed more sharply than expected and could tumble into a prolonged downturn, but most analysts remained cautiously optimistic that it would bounce back by summer. Big declines were recorded in consumer confidence, factory orders, and new-home sales. Also, a government report due today is expected to show a dramatic slowing of the economy in the last three months of 2000, according to advance estimates by economists.
BUSINESS
July 29, 1999 | Daily News staff and wire reports
REAL ESTATE German investor set to buy One Liberty A German investor plans to buy One Liberty Place, the city's tallest and one of its most distinctive buildings. The purchase price of $250 million in cash reportedly negotiated by Sunbelt Management of Palm Beach Gardens, Fla., for the 61-story skyscraper and adjoining Shops at Liberty Place shopping mall and hotel complex is substantially less than the $600 million construction price. The depressed value has been caused by the tower's long-term leaseholders, who signed when the renter's market was cheaper, according to one analyst.
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