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NEWS
July 20, 2004 | By Bonnie L. Cook INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Federal investigators cannot determine the cause of a fire last week that destroyed a Pottstown factory owned by bakers embroiled in litigation over stolen recipes. Gen MacDonald, spokeswoman for the federal Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms, said yesterday that preliminary examination of the scene showed that the evidence needed to gauge the fire's origin most likely was consumed by the blaze. The fire at Washington and High Streets was reported early last Tuesday and quickly grew to five alarms.
NEWS
September 23, 1990 | By Michael V. Copeland, Special to The Inquirer
A fire that broke out early Thursday morning at the Dali-Fresh Inc. factory on Main Street in Tullytown may have caused more than $250,000 in building damage, according to an insurance adjuster. The two-alarm fire at the wholesale snack foods factory was reported at 6:40 a.m. by an employee at the nearby Meenan Oil Co. and was under control shortly after 8 a.m., according to Tullytown Fire Chief Dick Johnson. "I could see the smoke from a mile away as I drove in," said Edward "Butch" Bomentry, assistant chief of the Edgeley Fire Co., who was the first firefighter on the scene.
REAL_ESTATE
November 26, 1989 | By Susan Warner, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the rush to resettle corporate headquarters in glamorous downtown office towers or sleek country campuses, Fischer & Porter Co. has held its ground. Three years ago, the Bucks County company, which manufactures industrial flow-measurement equipment, wanted to upgrade its image and considered moving to a tony new development. That was until top managers learned that the move would cost about $22 million. Instead, the company turned to its rundown factory complex on 40 acres in Warminster and, for less than half the price of a move, transformed it into a glossy world headquarters with a glass-atrium lobby.
NEWS
December 12, 1990 | By Mark Jaffe, Inquirer Staff Writer
Donald Klumpp and Kristin Laczkawski are neighbors. They share a block in Port Richmond, where Klumpp is vice president of the Aldan Rubber Co. and Kristin is a fourth grader at St. George's Parish School. The factory and the school have shared the block for nearly 70 years. In that time, Aldan has turned out a lot of rubberized fabric for life rafts and St. George's has graduated about 1,500 students. But times have changed and a heated debate is taking place over whether the school and the factory can operate side by side.
NEWS
March 23, 1995 | by Nicole Weisensee, Daily News Staff Writer
Police arrested a 13-year-old boy earlier this week in the investigation into the Quaker Lace Co. arson that destroyed the old North Philadelphia factory and half of a city block. The arrest of the youth, whose name was not released by police, was the third so far. The boy, who lives on Russell Street near 7th, was charged with arson, criminal mischief, possession of an incendiary device, recklessly endangering another person, aggravated assault and simple assault. Sources said the boy originally told police he was in the factory to act as a lookout and did not actually help set the fire.
NEWS
November 26, 2012 | By Julhas Alam, Associated Press
DHAKA, Bangladesh - Fire raced through a garment factory that supplies major retailers in the West, killing at least 112 people, many of whom were trapped by the flames because the eight-story building lacked emergency exits, an official said Sunday. The blaze broke out late Saturday at a factory operated just outside Bangladesh's capital of Dhaka by Tazreen Fashions Ltd., a subsidiary of the Tuba Group, which makes products for Wal-Mart and other companies in the United States and Europe.
NEWS
March 12, 2013 | BY VALERIE RUSS, Daily News Staff Writer russv@phillynews.com, 215-854-5987
VERNA TYNER was 10 when her family moved to Venango Street in Tioga 40 years ago. "I thought I'd died and gone to heaven," Tyner said of her new home. "It was just a gorgeous, beautiful neighborhood. The lawns were manicured. The trees were trimmed. " But as Tyner grew up, the neighborhood fell down. Dozens of factories that dotted Tioga, Nicetown and Allegheny West began closing, putting thousands of people out of work. Among them: the Budd Co., which made railcars and later automobile doors; Tasty Baking Co., maker of Tastykakes; and the Stanley Blacker suit factory.
NEWS
October 10, 1995 | by Kevin Haney, Daily News Staff Writer
For eight years, the former Transit America factory in Somerton has been shuttered, awaiting a tenant or owner who would have some use for the 194-acre facility. That's not to say the plant doesn't have plenty of occupants these days - the four-legged kind. About 70 deer make their home on the old factory grounds, according to Jerry Schnee, the plant controller who supervises a skeleton plant maintenance staff of 21. They've become a sort of informal zoo. The sight of the deer has become a regular attraction for neighbors and motorists passing by the plant on Red Lion Road, at the city's border with Montgomery County.
NEWS
February 6, 2014 | BY DAVID GAMBACORTA, Daily News Staff Writer gambacd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5994
THE FAMILIES of fallen Philadelphia Fire Department Lt. Robert Neary and firefighter Daniel Sweeney wanted justice, plain and simple. What they got, nearly two years after Neary and Sweeney died while battling an enormous factory fire in Kensington, was a whole lot of nothin'. Joe Schulle, president of the International Association of Fire Fighters Local 22, said yesterday that Neary's and Sweeney's kin were "devastated" when they learned Monday that District Attorney Seth Williams wasn't going to file charges against Michael and Nahman Lichtenstein, the owners of the former Thomas Buck Hosiery factory, despite a damning 110-page grand-jury report on the case.
NEWS
June 20, 1988 | By Beth Gillin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Morris Sheintoch, a Russian immigrant who developed a modest garment factory into a national supplier of children's apparel, died Saturday at Lankenau Hospital. He was 85 and lived in Bala Cynwyd. Mr. Sheintoch was founder and chairman of the Good Lad Co., at 431 E. Tioga St. in Kensington, which ships children's clothing to such major department stores as Bloomingdale's, Marshall Field and Jordan Marsh, as well as boutiques across the country. The firm is the largest manufacturer of children's apparel in the city, according to Mr. Sheintoch's son, Peter, president and chief executive officer since 1975.
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