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Failure Rate

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NEWS
June 27, 1987 | By VALERIA M. RUSS, Daily News Staff Writer
Almost one in four pupils in Philadelphia public elementary schools was not promoted this year, up slightly over last year. District officials, though, say the promotion rate is acceptable because academic standards are being toughened and will be increased again next year. Figures released yesterday show 23 percent, or 24,911 of 108,000 elementary pupils, failed this year, as compared with 21 percent, or 20,003, last year, the first year of the district's toughened promotion policy.
NEWS
March 12, 1992 | By Alison F. Orenstein, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
In response to concerns raised by parents at a school board meeting in January, the Oaklyn Board of Education has released a report on the number of students not promoted to the next grade at the end of the 1989-90 school year. The report, compiled by Superintendent Henry Linder, showed that only 22 percent - not the 28 percent claimed by one parent - flunked in her son's seventh-grade class. One parent told the board on Jan. 27 that 11 of 40 students in her son's class were not promoted.
NEWS
August 29, 1991 | By Rob Wingate, Special to The Inquirer
About 17 percent of the freshmen and sophomores at the Upper Merion Area High School did not meet requirements last June for promotion to the next grade, according to a district report released Monday. The report raised the eyebrows of some school board members, but others called it evidence that the district's educational program was a rigorous one. According to Assistant Superintendent Laura Michener, 44 of 261 10th graders last year, or 16.9 percent of the class, failed to meet academic standards for promotion to 11th grade before summer school began.
NEWS
February 9, 1992 | By Alison F. Orenstein, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
A surprised Oaklyn Board of Education recently heard complaints from several parents who said that an unusually large number of students in the district were not being promoted. At a school board meeting Jan. 27, Jeanne Ann Brown told the board that 11 of the 40 students in her son's seventh-grade class - 25 percent - were retained two years ago, while 29 moved up to eighth grade. Brown said the information came from her son, who is now in eighth grade at the Oaklyn School.
BUSINESS
August 15, 1997 | By Henry J. Holcomb, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Citing a 30 percent failure rate in recent tests of Omega fire suppression sprinklers, Underwriters Laboratories yesterday urged users of the sprinklers to have them tested - and possibly replaced. The devices, made by Central Sprinkler Corp. of Lansdale, came under scrutiny after two Omega model heads failed to operate in two 1995 fires - one in a Michigan hotel and another in a veterans hospital in New York state. UL, of Northbrook, Ill., was initially hired by Central to certify the performance of the Omega heads before they went on the market in 1983.
BUSINESS
June 6, 2015
Extra cash. Steady income no matter how long you live. No need to repay. Both explicitly and implicitly, reverse-mortgage pitches often make the equity-tapping loans sound like a risk-free answer for borrowers facing a shortfall in retirement income. But they have a failure rate of about 10 percent, far beyond those of conventional mortgages. That's one reason the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau moved Thursday to advance its campaign aimed at ensuring that homeowners understand their risks, as well as their benefits.
SPORTS
September 2, 2016 | By Marcus Hayes, Daily News Columnist
In the 2012 U.S. presidential election, 43 percent of eligible citizens failed to exercise their right and duty to vote. That failure rate rose to 64 percent in the midterm elections of 2014, the lowest rate since 1942, when the country was engaged in World War II. Recent data suggest that only 25 percent of citizens called for jury duty bother to show up. Americans say they are dissatisfied with the shenanigans of Congress, but polls show...
NEWS
February 20, 1987 | By Walter F. Roche Jr., Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
The attorney for an environmental group says the state should make auto emission tests tougher because current standards allow too many cars to pass. Jerome Balter of the Public Interest Law Center of Philadelphia, the attorney for the Clean Air Council of Philadelphia, said he had urged state officials to tighten the standards after reviewing a recent status report on the two-year-old tailpipe testing program. The quarterly progress report filed early this month under the provisions of a federal court consent decree shows that during the three-month period ending in August 1986, 14 percent of the 653,589 vehicles tested failed on the first try. Under the consent decree, Balter noted, the state had agreed to set standards strict enough to ensure a 20 percent failure rate.
NEWS
December 3, 1989 | By Lini S. Kadaba, Inquirer Staff Writer
Although more Northeast public high school students passed the critical ninth grade than the citywide average, at least one-fifth of the students still failed. Also, two of the four Northeast schools sent fewer students to college than the citywide average. Attendance rates, however, were higher at all four Northeast high schools compared with the citywide average. These are some of the findings based on Philadelphia School District statistics released last month in a two-inch-thick report titled "The Superintendent's Management Information Center.
NEWS
June 19, 1990 | Marc Schogol from reports from Inquirer wire services
BABY-MONITOR RECALL Parents, take note: Some models of a device designed to warn that an infant has stopped breathing may not work, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration warns. The device, also used to monitor adults who suffer apnea - temporary breathing cessation - is manufactured by Electronic Monitors Inc., which is recalling models RE-134B and Mon-A-Therm Respirate, for those older than 4 years old, and Models RE-134C and RE-134D, for infants. THE DADDY TRACK Here's the latest sociological trend: More than one million divorced and widowed fathers are on the "daddy track," learning to balance children, housework, social life and career as single parents, reports the Census Bureau.
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SPORTS
September 2, 2016 | By Marcus Hayes, Daily News Columnist
In the 2012 U.S. presidential election, 43 percent of eligible citizens failed to exercise their right and duty to vote. That failure rate rose to 64 percent in the midterm elections of 2014, the lowest rate since 1942, when the country was engaged in World War II. Recent data suggest that only 25 percent of citizens called for jury duty bother to show up. Americans say they are dissatisfied with the shenanigans of Congress, but polls show...
BUSINESS
June 6, 2015
Extra cash. Steady income no matter how long you live. No need to repay. Both explicitly and implicitly, reverse-mortgage pitches often make the equity-tapping loans sound like a risk-free answer for borrowers facing a shortfall in retirement income. But they have a failure rate of about 10 percent, far beyond those of conventional mortgages. That's one reason the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau moved Thursday to advance its campaign aimed at ensuring that homeowners understand their risks, as well as their benefits.
SPORTS
December 8, 2010
THE EAGLES won another football game Thursday night, even as their defense lost three more red-zone battles. If you're counting, and both Andy Reid and defensive coordinator Sean McDermott most certainly are, the Eagles have given up 14 red-zone touchdowns in 17 challenges over the last five games. For the season, they have allowed 26 in 33 opponent trips inside the 20, which is a league-worst 78.8 failure rate. That's the bad news. The good news is that despite the defense's red-zone ineptitude, the Eagles still have managed to win four of those five games and head into Sunday night's battle in Arlington, Texas, against the Cowboys tied for the NFC East lead with an 8-4 record.
NEWS
June 4, 2010 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
More students passed New Jersey's new alternative high school exit exam on their second try, but as many as 4,500 students remain in danger of not graduating this month, according to testimony Thursday by Education Commissioner Bret Schundler. About half the students who had failed the Alternative High School Assessment in January passed it when they took it again in April, Schundler told the state Senate Education Committee. Nevertheless, he said, "at this point we're dealing with about 4,500 students" statewide who have not passed.
BUSINESS
December 6, 2008 | By Alan J. Heavens INQUIRER REAL ESTATE WRITER
Rising unemployment in states already hit hard by foreclosures helped boost mortgage-delinquency rates in the third quarter from the second, the Mortgage Bankers Association said yesterday. Nine states had foreclosure-start rates above the national average of 6.99 percent: Nevada, Florida, Arizona, California, Michigan, Rhode Island, Illinois, Indiana and Ohio. The rest - Pennsylvania, New Jersey and 39 others - were below that average. There were no year-over-year state comparisons provided, but the national increase was 1.4 percent from the third quarter of 2007.
NEWS
March 3, 2008 | By Ted Hershberg
Imagine a still pond and a heavy stone tossed high in the air from the shore. Landing in the middle, there is nary a ripple. That's what happened after recent newspaper stories that 45 percent of Pennsylvania's graduating seniors failed their math and reading exams. Not a word of outrage. No letters to the editor. No call to hold educators accountable for such deplorable results despite a total annual expenditure of almost $20 billion in state and local funds. The results are even more sobering.
NEWS
May 29, 2003 | By Jennifer Moroz INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Martin Dubin has been driving for most of his 82 years. He knows how to handle a car. And he does it well, he says. But none of that mattered to the people behind the counter at the local motor-vehicle office. The rules were clear: If you're new to New Jersey and want a driver's license, you take a written test, period. "I've been driving for 66 years without an accident, but do you think they care about that? No. All they want to do is put you in front of a stupid computer, and it's pass or fail," said Dubin, who moved from Wyncote to Marlton in September.
NEWS
December 9, 2002 | By Anthony R. Wood INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Last week's snowfall was remarkably well-forecast. The estimates of 5 to 9 inches were about as close as the weathermen ever get to predicting what actually happens. But don't get used to it. One thing is all but a certainty: At some point in the next few months, the prognosticators are going to blow it big-time, leaving a legacy of milk-clogged refrigerators and mightily disappointed schoolchildren. Whether the winter is cold or mild, snowy or dry, this is looking like an especially good season for storm scares.
BUSINESS
June 6, 2001 | By Ewart Rouse INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
After nearly a decade experimenting in his kitchen in Westmont, Camden County, with his own recipes for beer, Gene Muller quit his job as an ad-agency creative person to go commercial. He was that confident that he had come up with a salable product. His dream was to open a brewpub - a restaurant that served its own beer - in Philadelphia's Old City. But though potential investors agreed that his brew had a distinctive taste and was refreshing, they did not think Muller had the business acumen to crack the crowded specialty-beer market.
NEWS
January 13, 2001 | By Susan Snyder, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
At Philadelphia's only year-round public school, principal Michael Rosenberg is hoping to cut the expected failure rate in half by this summer. His method? Twenty-eight extra school days for those struggling academically at the yet-to-be named school at B Street and Olney Avenue. The 800-student middle school, serving grades five, six and seven, is able to offer the extra schooling during scheduled vacation breaks, such as the nine-day session that began on Jan. 2 and ended yesterday.
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