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NEWS
January 21, 2012
Federal regulators on Friday closed the one-branch American Eagle Savings Bank in Boothwyn, Delaware County, and sold its assets to a Maryland bank. The Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. said the failed bank would reopen Saturday as a branch of Capital Bank N.A. Customers could continue to use their checks and ATM cards, and deposit insurance would remain in effect, "so there is no need for customers to change their banking relationship" at this time, the FDIC said. As of Sept. 30, American Eagle had approximately $19.6 million in total assets and $17.7 million in total deposits.
NEWS
February 9, 2011 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Staff Writer
Federal officials delivered reassuring news Tuesday to Toyota and its customers: A 10-month study by engineers at NASA found no evidence that electronic or software failures contributed to thousands of complaints that Toyota vehicles could suddenly speed out of control. At a news conference in Washington, Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood said NASA supported the stance of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, which pressed Toyota to recall nearly eight million vehicles in 2009 and 2010 because of gas pedals that could stick or get trapped by loose floor mats.
NEWS
March 12, 2002 | By Robert Tracinski
The American press seems to have contracted Black Hawk Down Syndrome, a malady in which reporters and editorialists, whose military experience consists largely of watching Hollywood war movies, project a hand-wringing fear of American military failure. These reactions may seem bizarre after a period of extraordinary military success, but they do make sense - because the very same organizations promoting this defeatism also promote the policies that would actually lead to defeat. After an American helicopter was shot down in Afghanistan at the beginning of the battle in Shah-e-Kot, the media was awash in references to Black Hawk Down, the recent film about a bloody 1993 military mission in the Somalian city of Mogadishu, which went awry when an American helicopter crashed.
NEWS
February 25, 2004 | By Louis D. Greenwald
New Jersey's Division of Youth and Family Services is one of the most expensive state agencies to operate. Its budget surpasses $330 million a year, including a $25 million increase targeted for new hiring and other reform initiatives authorized in 2003. Gov. McGreevey is now proposing a $141 million boost in direct programs as his response to a spate of nationally publicized incidents of abuse, neglect and death involving children who had been placed under DYFS care. The governor's plan also would address concerns raised in a lawsuit mounted by child-advocacy groups that are seeking sweeping changes in the state's child-protection agency.
NEWS
January 3, 2000 | By Tomoeh Murakami, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Pastor Chad Hinson remembers the frustration he felt growing up in inner-city Camden, the hardships of his nomadic life, and the calming feeling of liquor. When the 27-year-old pastor sermonizes about drunkenness and the evils of addiction, or the need to be strong enough to survive alone, he connects, said many of the members of his rapidly expanding New Strength Gospel Church in Audubon. That is because, they said, the pastor bears the years he spent bar-hopping in Camden and roaming in Oakland, Calif.
NEWS
March 20, 1986
Comparisons of NASA with Watergate gain credence. The administration's obsession with full-speed-ahead mentality has destroyed seven astronauts, the image of the space program and extended to all branches of government and industry. We've seen the same failures extended to the several nuclear weapon's failures - Pershing, cruise, MX. Congress must investigate fully NASA and its links to weapons systems. It is especially important to investigate the Pentagon whose mentality personifies these failures.
NEWS
October 20, 1992 | Daily News wire services
WASHINGTON HEAT STILL ON HUBBLE'S MAKER Nearly two years after accepting technical explanations for flaws in the Hubble Space Telescope, the federal government is investigating whether the manufacturer withheld critical information that might have prevented costly and embarrassing failures. A NASA investigating board found in November 1990 that the manufacturer of Hubble's lenses, Perkin-Elmer Corp.'s former optics division, ignored three test failures and did not consult its own experts in building the defective $1.5 billion instrument.
NEWS
August 10, 2007
LAST WEEK'S collapse of the I-35 West Bridge in Minneapolis was the latest in a series of infrastructure failures that have served to raise awareness and concern on the part of the public, the media and our government. In Manhattan, a steam pipe exploded, resulting in one death and countless dollars of lost productivity when a section of the city was shut down for public safety. In Texas, continual infrastructure failures at oil and gas facilities disrupt energy supplies at a time our country can least afford them.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 2, 1995 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
"It is not enough to succeed," Gore Vidal asserted. "Others must fail. " Such acid sentiment tinges Sidney Lumet's 1968 comedy, Bye Bye Braverman, the tale of four Manhattan literary chums, failures all, who pile into a VW bound for Brooklyn to pay their last disrespects to their one successful friend. This cheerfully morbid and mordant character study stars George Segal, Jack Warden, Sorrell Booke and Godfrey Cambridge whose collective schadenfreude translates as: we might be failures, but he's dead.
NEWS
November 6, 2006
SOME QUESTIONS I'll be asking myself Nov. 7: 1. I have been told repeatedly that if we leave Iraq, the terrorists will follow us home. How? 2. How was the Baath regime any different than the current government in Sudan? 3. Does the absence of a terrorist attack on U.S. soil since Sept. 12, 2002, absolve this administration from the failures of 9/11? Stefan Weinberg Philadelphia
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NEWS
September 16, 2016 | By Karen Langley, HARRISBURG BUREAU
HARRISBURG - A state effort to target funding to lagging school districts did not reduce student achievement and per-student spending disparities, a recent study says. Under the plan, which is no longer in effect, the state sent additional money to school districts that were spending less than what a formula determined was adequate for a district with its number of students and level of poverty, among other factors. The planned six-year program ended after three years. Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania and Georgia State University concluded in a National Tax Journal study published earlier this month that the payments Pennsylvania sent to these districts did not reduce the gaps in spending or student achievement that separate wealthy and poorer districts.
NEWS
August 5, 2016
By Michael A. MacDowell It's debatable whether it was Einstein, Ben Franklin, Mark Twain, or none of them who said that the definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over again and expecting a different outcome. What isn't debatable is the validity of the statement. Individuals, institutions, and countries should learn from past mistakes, but they don't. Take Venezuela. When Hugo Chávez, the self-styled democratic socialist, was elected president of Venezuela in 1999, the country was wealthy, possessing immense proven oil reserves.
NEWS
August 4, 2016 | By Marie McCullough, Staff Writer
A widely prescribed diabetes drug that has shown potential for helping weakened hearts failed to reduce deaths or rehospitalizations in a study of patients with advanced heart failure. There was a trend toward worse outcomes among the heart-failure patients who also had diabetes, but this could have occurred by chance. The clinical trial of 300 patients, published Tuesday in the Journal of the American Medical Association, was led by the University of Pennsylvania and involved 24 U.S. centers, including Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Temple University Hospital, and Lancaster Heart and Stroke Foundation.
NEWS
July 15, 2016 | By Martha Woodall, STAFF WRITER martha.woodall@ phillynews.com 215-854-2789 @marwooda
A teacher at beleaguered Delaware Valley Charter High School has asked the Philadelphia School District's top financial official to reconsider withholding $820,000 in payments to the school this summer. The district said the charter school in Logan owes the money for overbilling for students in past years and failing to make required pension payments for teachers. But Matthew Black, 27, who has taught math at the school for two years, said it's the teachers and other staffers who were hurt when the charter could not make payroll last week.
NEWS
July 2, 2016
By Marc Bookman Forty years ago, on July 2, 1976, the U.S. Supreme Court put its imprimatur on capital punishment in the case of Gregg v. Georgia . This was a surprising development. Only four years earlier, the court had struck down death-penalty laws across the country, declaring the death penalty "cruel and unusual in the same way as being struck by lightning is cruel and unusual. " In other words, the laws did not target those most deserving of the maximum punishment, instead making death sentences a random occurrence.
SPORTS
July 1, 2016 | By Bob Ford, Inquirer Columnist
History is as fresh as yesterday, still moving under the microscope, still capable of becoming something different when it is finally preserved forever in amber. The historical view of Buddy Ryan in this town has stabilized in the years since he was fired by Norman Braman in 1991. After 25 years, Ryan's varied and unpredictable personality has narrowed to the caricature of the wisecracking bully who united both a team and a city. That's true enough, looking through the other end of the binoculars, and Ryan, who died this week at 85 after going a full four quarters with cancer, would certainly approve the shorthand version of his biography with the Eagles.
NEWS
June 28, 2016 | By Walter Olson
Following a long campaign that drew support from both revenue-hungry local-spending advocates and paternalist nonprofits and foundations, Philadelphia City Council has approved a 1 1/2-cent-per-ounce tax on soft drinks, whether naturally or artificially sweetened, on top of an existing 8 percent city sales tax, adding about a dollar to the cost of a two-liter bottle. Lay aside for now the specter of nanny-statism (former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg chipped in for a pro-tax ad campaign)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 2016 | By Nick Cristiano, Staff Writer
It wasn't until Bonnie Bishop gave up on her dream that it came true. The Texas native had spent 12 years scuffling as an independent singer-songwriter without making much headway, even after having two of her songs recorded by Bonnie Raitt and another performed on the prime-time TV soap Nashville . It got to the point where she couldn't even afford Christmas presents for her family. So she retreated to her parents' home in the Lone Star State to regroup. "I couldn't keep doing it the way I was doing it," the 37-year-old says over the phone from Nashville.
NEWS
June 9, 2016
By Stacey Kallem, Barbara H. Chaiyachati, and Irène P. Mathieu One of the most rewarding parts of training to be a pediatrician is caring for a newborn patient and then watching that child grow up into a bright, curious, and engaging toddler. However, all too often, we see those perfect newborns we care for face obstacles beyond their control that hinder healthy development. Adversity in the first few years of life, such as poverty, parental substance abuse, and neighborhood violence, can result in toxic stress, or dangerously high stress over long periods of time.
NEWS
May 11, 2016
By Veronique de Rugy It's no surprise that trust in the government is at an all-time low. Government failures and promises broken by administration officials in the last eight years alone have been plentiful. Take the botched recovery after the Great Recession. The Obama administration promised that if the government spent $800 billion in stimulus, unemployment wouldn't rise above 8.8 percent. The plan was adopted, the spending was on its way, and the unemployment rate shot up above 10 percent and hovered at this painful level for months.
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