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Fair Housing Act

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NEWS
March 28, 1993 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A federal court trial date has been set for mid-June in the case of a paraplegic man's challenge of the township Zoning Hearing Board's refusal to grant him a variance to build an addition to his home. Township Solicitor Peter Rohanna said during Wednesday's commissioners' meeting that Judge Van Artsdalen was still considering Robert Pulcinella's request to add on to his property at 717 Mount Ave. Through attorney Clifford Boardman, Pulcinella is suing the township under the U.S. Fair Housing Act. "Why because of a car accident should my client be forced to lose his home?"
NEWS
April 22, 1988 | By Scott Brodeur, Special to The Inquirer
Despite his reservations about state regulations on the Fair Housing Act, West Deptford Mayor Kenneth R. Hinkle cast the deciding vote last night to require construction over the next six years of 296 low- and moderate-income housing units in the township. The 296 units are the township's quota set by the state legislation. Under the new ordinance, which was approved 3-2, a new development must set aside 20 percent of its units for low- and moderate-income housing in the form of condominiums.
NEWS
June 17, 1988 | By Roy H. Campbell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Civil rights activist and former Georgia state Sen. Julian Bond yesterday called the Fair Housing Act of 1968 a "great failed effort" and he charged that the law has no teeth and has had little effect on discrimination in housing. "For many black potential homeowners, their biggest handicap isn't lack of income, but simple lack of opportunity caused by the failure of the fair housing" act, Bond said during a speech yesterday before the National Neighbors Conference. Bond, who rose to prominence during the civil rights movement of the 1960s, was the opening speaker at the fair-housing advocacy group's 19th annual conference, which is continuing through Sunday at Drexel University.
NEWS
June 11, 1994 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With victory in a federal appeals court yesterday, Project HOME may have finally won its four-year battle to build permanent housing for 48 formerly homeless people at 1515 Fairmount Ave. A three-judge panel unanimously upheld a federal judge's order that found the city violated the federal Fair Housing Act when it refused to issue a permit allowing the building to open. "We won!" said a jubilant Sister Mary Scullion, founder of Project HOME. She had fought, along with the U.S. Justice Department, for the right to open the single-room-occupancy home for 48 homeless people recovering from drug and alcohol addictions and mental illnesses.
REAL_ESTATE
September 19, 1993 | By Don Beideman, FOR THE INQUIRER
Kathy and Paul Harvey knew what they were looking for when they went on a four-day, whirlwind house-hunting tour through Chester County last month. Because Paul had already taken a new position in Philadelphia, the couple was eager to find a place so Kathy and the couple's son, Ryan, 6, and daughter, Allison, 4, could move here from the West Coast. "There were several things that I wanted - a good school district, a little more land, a larger home than we had in California, and a sense of community," Kathy Harvey said.
NEWS
September 10, 2016 | By David O'Reilly, Staff Writer
New Jersey's Supreme Court said Thursday that it would hear a challenge that will decide whether municipalities now must zone for the affordable housing units they did not zone for between 1999 and 2015. The court announced it had accepted an appeal by the Fair Share Housing Center, an advocacy group that is seeking to overturn a July 12 ruling by the Appellate Division. The three-judge panel ruled unanimously that municipalities have no obligation to zone for units not created during the nearly 16-year "gap period," when the state failed to devise an acceptable formula for calculating each town's obligation.
NEWS
October 1, 1992 | by Nicole Weisensee, Special to the Daily News
Four years ago, Sen. Arlen Specter, R-Pa., was the darling of civil-rights groups for his strong advocacy of the Fair Housing Act. Now, many of those same groups are asking him to vote against appeals court nominee Francis Keating, the general counsel for the Department of Housing and Urban Development who they say has blocked enforcement of the law. The Keating vote puts Specter in a ticklish position. He's in a tough race with Democrat Lynn Yeakel and has made an aggressive effort to woo African- American voters away from her. Specter yesterday said he had not had a chance to review all the documents on Keating and had not decided how he would vote.
NEWS
November 5, 1993 | By Vernon Loeb, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In a strange case that even the judge says should not be in litigation, the U.S. Justice Department will argue today in federal court that the Rendell administration is violating the Fair Housing Act by refusing to authorize a proposed housing facility for the homeless at 1515 Fairmount Ave. What makes it so strange is that the administration professes total support for the project - and could, in a virtual heartbeat, end the controversy....
REAL_ESTATE
October 1, 2006 | By Alan J. Heavens INQUIRER REAL ESTATE WRITER
Despite increases in homeownership by African Americans and Latinos, recent studies indicate that minority groups continue to face barriers to housing choice and affordability. A report by the National Association of Home Builders and the NAACP says the homeownership rate for African Americans remains nearly 20 percentage points below the national average. In addition, the report says, half of all African Americans live in unaffordable, inadequate or crowded housing. A shortage of workforce housing in many metropolitan areas creates especially severe problems for minorities, even those employed in key community-support occupations, such as police officers, teachers, firefighters, and health-care workers.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 10, 2016 | By David O'Reilly, Staff Writer
New Jersey's Supreme Court said Thursday that it would hear a challenge that will decide whether municipalities now must zone for the affordable housing units they did not zone for between 1999 and 2015. The court announced it had accepted an appeal by the Fair Share Housing Center, an advocacy group that is seeking to overturn a July 12 ruling by the Appellate Division. The three-judge panel ruled unanimously that municipalities have no obligation to zone for units not created during the nearly 16-year "gap period," when the state failed to devise an acceptable formula for calculating each town's obligation.
NEWS
July 31, 2016 | By Harold Brubaker, STAFF WRITER
Citizens Bank has agreed to pay $115,000 to settle a complaint that it told a woman who was on maternity leave with full pay that she would have to return to work before the bank would approve a home-equity line of credit, U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development said Friday. As part of the settlement of the alleged Fair Housing Act violation, Citizens Bank will pay the woman $40,000, provide fair-housing training to its staff, and make a $75,000 donation to a HUD-approved fair-housing or advocacy organization.
NEWS
July 13, 2016 | By David O'Reilly, Staff Writer
In a ruling hailed by municipalities and denounced as a victory for "wealthy towns," New Jersey's Appellate Division ruled Monday that cities and townships are not required to zone for affordable housing needs that went unmet between 1999 and 2015. "We hold that the Fair Housing Act does not require a municipality to retroactively calculate a new 'separate and discrete' affordable housing obligation arising during the 'gap period,' " the three-judge panel wrote. Instead, it said, municipalities should use previously established methods for calculating their present and future affordable housing needs through 2025.
NEWS
June 8, 2016 | By David O'Reilly, Staff Writer
A panel of Appellate Division judges heard arguments Monday on whether New Jersey's municipalities must zone for the many thousands of affordable housing units that were not approved between 1999 and 2015. The court promised a quick decision. At issue is whether townships and cities that did not zone for their legally mandated share of low- and middle-income housing during this "gap period" must do so on top of their obligations through 2025. If the panel rules in favor of an affordable-housing advocacy group's position, it could double or triple the Mount Laurel -type housing obligations of some municipalities.
NEWS
June 7, 2016 | By David O'Reilly, Staff Writer
Just how much affordable housing New Jersey must provide for in the decade ahead may hang in the balance Monday when an appeals panel convenes in Mount Holly's historic Olde Courthouse. Three judges of the Appellate Division are to consider whether municipalities have a persisting obligation to zone for all the housing units that went unapproved between 1999 and 2015. During that period, the state failed to devise a formula for calculating those obligations under the New Jersey Supreme Court's Mount Laurel decisions.
NEWS
April 9, 2016 | By David O'Reilly, Staff Writer
The planning consultant for hundreds of New Jersey municipalities has more than doubled to 72,000 its estimate of how many affordable-housing units towns might have to zone for statewide over the next decade. The 37,000 additional units are the firm's estimate of need if the state courts should rule that municipalities had a legal obligation to make room for low- and middle-income households between 1999 and 2015. In December, the Philadelphia firm, Econsult Solutions, had estimated the statewide obligation at slightly more than 35,000 units.
NEWS
February 21, 2016 | By David O'Reilly, Staff Writer
In a ruling that may prove influential across New Jersey, a judge in Ocean County has concluded that municipalities must zone for the affordable housing projects they did not build over the last 15 years. "The court finds that municipalities are constitutionally mandated to address this obligation" as spelled out in the 1985 Fair Housing Act, Superior Court Judge Mark A. Troncone wrote in an opinion handed down Thursday. Troncone's ruling does not establish legal precedent outside Ocean County.
NEWS
February 16, 2016 | By David O'Reilly, Staff Writer
An advocacy group for affordable housing is asking New Jersey judges to reject the methods a consulting firm used to calculate the affordable housing obligations for hundreds of municipalities. In briefs filed Friday in numerous South Jersey Superior Courts, the Fair Share Housing Center described as "specious" and "highly dubious" the methods that Econsult Solutions Inc. of Philadelphia recently used to project the state's household growth and population through 2025. Based on those projections and other data, Econsult calculated that the state's 565 municipalities need to accommodate 37,000 affordable housing units over the next decade.
NEWS
January 13, 2016 | By David O'Reilly, Staff Writer
A new but disputed report contends that New Jersey's 565 municipalities must zone for the creation of 37,000 low-income housing units by 2025 - far fewer than projected by a key advocacy group - to meet the state Supreme Court's latest directives for implementing the Fair Housing Act. The figure in the report, conducted by the Philadelphia planning firm Econsult Solutions on behalf of more than 200 New Jersey municipalities, is far below the nearly 202,000...
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