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Fair Price

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NEWS
October 8, 2010 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Question: The books The House You Build by Duo Dickinson and The Not So Big House by Sarah Susanka have provided valuable insight into building and designing spaces for the way we live, artistically well-designed and comfortable, without breaking the bank and not too large. A few years ago, we hired a contractor to renovate our family room with floor-to-ceiling casement windows, marble-face fireplace, and new bookcases flanking the fireplace. The result was stunning and we loved working with the contractor.
NEWS
April 2, 1998
Take one urban community, overflowing with school-age children, in need of a bigger school. Add a fire-gutted, debris-laden former factory bought in 1995 for $66,923 by a community activist who works for a state politician. Add appraisals that now value the site at $1 million or more. Result: A foul stew of money, politics and misplaced priorities. That's a helping of outrage the School District of Philadelphia had best not serve at a time it's fighting to get more state aid from a legislature that is at best indifferent and often hostile.
NEWS
March 17, 2011
An article Monday, "Alarm sounded over N.J. cable bill," gives too much credence to opponents who claim telephone rates will rise if the state Senate passes the Market Competition and Consumer Choice Act. These baseless allegations serve only to confuse consumers. Verizon has no plans to withdraw from providing basic voice-service offerings in New Jersey, nor do we have any plans to go on a rapacious round of price increases. We understand that competition, not regulation, is what keeps prices low and services in line with customer expectations.
NEWS
February 27, 2013
RE: A LITTLE help? (editorial, Feb. 21). The championing of "universal pre-K" by the left is nothing more than the continuance of pretending that a symptom is the disease, and the cure for it is another nanny-state program. Let us cut to the chase: 40 years ago, part of a generation jettisoned fatherhood and responsible parenting. In their wake was left a new generation of mental invalids, clinging to the desperate absurdity, the hallucinogenic illusion, that government should be tending the light at the end of the tunnel for them.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 2009
In my first spring installment of an occasional series on warm-weather sippers, this 2007 fumé blanc from Sonoma's Chateau St. Jean ranks high for lip-smacking complexity at a fair price. Fumé blanc, of course, was a figment of Robert Mondavi's brilliant imagination, a sexy '70s rebranding for then-unglamorous sauvignon blanc. Its oak-enriched goldenness had little to do with the similarly named, but crisper, Pouilly-Fumé from the Loire. But it has lived on nonetheless as one of the most popular non-chardonnay expressions of California white.
FOOD
August 1, 1993 | By Sharon MacKenzie, FOR THE INQUIRER
Back when proper meals were served hot, preparing food for summer's hottest days was a thankless and unpleasant chore. Kitchens were sweltering, appetites wilted and cold cuts were the only alternative. Now cold foods have achieved new distinction and outdoor cooking is no longer limited to hamburgers. Our four-person menu this month reflects these culinary changes, with touches of luxury and lots of economy. Preparation is easy, using ingredients found in local supermarkets.
NEWS
April 3, 1988 | By Lita Solis-Cohen, Inquirer Antiques Writer
W. Graham Arader 3d buys and sells more antique maps and prints than anyone else in the world. "I'm only a speck in the $50 billion-a-year art market," he says - adding that his firm did $15 million worth of business last year. The corporate headquarters of Arader's empire is Ballygomingo, a 25-room, 1760 stone house surrounded by 1960-era split-levels in King of Prussia. He maintains a presence in Philadelphia at the former Sessler's bookstore at 1308 Walnut St., which he bought, closed and renamed the W. Graham Arader Gallery at Charles B. Sessler's.
SPORTS
May 26, 1993 | by Paul Domowitch, Daily News Sports Writer
The NFL owners finally got around to telling the league's five expansion candidates what it's going to cost to join their little club. Not surprisingly, it won't be cheap. Each of the two new franchises is going to have to ante up $156 million over the next six years. In addition, they will receive only a half share of television revenue, not to exceed $16.25 million, for each of their first three playing seasons. When the meter finally is done running in 1998, it will cost each of the two new franchises approximately $205 million.
NEWS
September 9, 1994 | By Wanda Motley, Vernon Loeb, and Marian Uhlman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Talks between the city and the University of Pennsylvania Medical Center over the center's plan to buy the Civic Center are "seriously ill" and have been indefinitely suspended, the university's chief negotiator says. The negotiator, Gordon Williams, says the city is simply asking too much for the 19 1/2-acre site, where the center wants to build a $900 million medical complex. Mayor Rendell said uncertainty about federal health-care policy had prompted Penn to back away from a deal.
NEWS
December 5, 1993 | By Suzanne Gordon, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ah, what a good price will do. When builder Tom Bentley opened the latest phase of his Treyburn development in Strafford at noon one recent Saturday, he found anxious buyers who had arrived the night before - like fans waiting for tickets to a Grateful Dead concert - for their chance to purchase one of his homes. The stunned developer welcomed them with open arms. He ordered up wine and beer for the dozen or so ready buyers who had spent the night in the model home, waiting for sales to begin.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 27, 2013
RE: A LITTLE help? (editorial, Feb. 21). The championing of "universal pre-K" by the left is nothing more than the continuance of pretending that a symptom is the disease, and the cure for it is another nanny-state program. Let us cut to the chase: 40 years ago, part of a generation jettisoned fatherhood and responsible parenting. In their wake was left a new generation of mental invalids, clinging to the desperate absurdity, the hallucinogenic illusion, that government should be tending the light at the end of the tunnel for them.
NEWS
March 17, 2011
An article Monday, "Alarm sounded over N.J. cable bill," gives too much credence to opponents who claim telephone rates will rise if the state Senate passes the Market Competition and Consumer Choice Act. These baseless allegations serve only to confuse consumers. Verizon has no plans to withdraw from providing basic voice-service offerings in New Jersey, nor do we have any plans to go on a rapacious round of price increases. We understand that competition, not regulation, is what keeps prices low and services in line with customer expectations.
NEWS
October 8, 2010 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Question: The books The House You Build by Duo Dickinson and The Not So Big House by Sarah Susanka have provided valuable insight into building and designing spaces for the way we live, artistically well-designed and comfortable, without breaking the bank and not too large. A few years ago, we hired a contractor to renovate our family room with floor-to-ceiling casement windows, marble-face fireplace, and new bookcases flanking the fireplace. The result was stunning and we loved working with the contractor.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 2009
In my first spring installment of an occasional series on warm-weather sippers, this 2007 fumé blanc from Sonoma's Chateau St. Jean ranks high for lip-smacking complexity at a fair price. Fumé blanc, of course, was a figment of Robert Mondavi's brilliant imagination, a sexy '70s rebranding for then-unglamorous sauvignon blanc. Its oak-enriched goldenness had little to do with the similarly named, but crisper, Pouilly-Fumé from the Loire. But it has lived on nonetheless as one of the most popular non-chardonnay expressions of California white.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 12, 2008 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
After toiling behind the lines of two of the city's most ambitious restaurants, Morimoto and Striped Bass, the two chefs named Nick - and their new restaurant called Nicholas - come with understandably high expectations. But after logging years of 60-hour weeks and high-volume cooking for the Starrs and Steins of the world, nothing sounded quite as appealing to Nick Matteo and Nick Sweeney as a little brick-box dining room they could call their own, where the hours are civil and the pursuit of straightforward, seasonal food is their primary goal.
NEWS
December 9, 2000
There really is no reason to pop champagne corks over City Council's approval early yesterday of deals to build two sports stadiums in South Philadelphia. In these deals, Philadelphia failed to take maximum economic and civic advantage of taxpayers' dollars by locating a new Phillies baseball stadium downtown, as other cities have managed to do with great effect. Meanwhile, any faint chance of ancillary retail/entertainment development near the stadiums eventually could be sorely compromised by a laundry list of concessions given to residents of nearby neighborhoods by Council President Anna Verna, whose district includes the stadium complex area.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 21, 2000 | By Gerald Etter, INQUIRER FOOD EDITOR
Finicky friends can often come in handy. Especially when their fussiness makes them super-critical - and most often fair - restaurant diners. So when this particular couple glowed about Mangia, a family restaurant in the Market Place of Abescon, along White Horse Pike, it became an imperative stop. And a pleasant one, as well. Mangia is a small, family-owned restaurant that has spent nearly two years proving that it is possible to create wholesome fare and offer it at a reasonable price.
NEWS
April 2, 1998
Take one urban community, overflowing with school-age children, in need of a bigger school. Add a fire-gutted, debris-laden former factory bought in 1995 for $66,923 by a community activist who works for a state politician. Add appraisals that now value the site at $1 million or more. Result: A foul stew of money, politics and misplaced priorities. That's a helping of outrage the School District of Philadelphia had best not serve at a time it's fighting to get more state aid from a legislature that is at best indifferent and often hostile.
NEWS
October 15, 1997
Born and reared in Philadelphia, Edwin Maldonado decided it was time to leave Puerto Rico and return home. Among his reasons: better health care for vision problems he and his wife have and for a heart condition that afflicts one of his six children. It is the kind of decision thousands of people make. But for Maldonado, it cost him and his family. The Maldonado family is on welfare. Because of their health problems, neither parent can work. In Puerto Rico, the couple got $304 a month in cash assistance.
NEWS
October 15, 1997
Thorough and efficient. Abbott v. Burke. That one phrase and those two names have hovered over New Jersey public education since 1981. The phrase comes from the state's constitution, in the section describing what kind of public education the state owes each of its children. Thorough and efficient - those three words imply many things, but settle nothing. Abbott v. Burke is the court case that for 16 years has struggled to define how the state should meet its duty to provide such an education to its poorest citizens.
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