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Fair Trade

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BUSINESS
July 9, 2012 | By Lisa Rathke and ASSOCIATED PRESS
Consumers will pay a little more for coffee and chocolate to ensure that the farmers who produce those foods get a fair wage. So why not ask them to pay more for milk? That's the notion behind a Vermont-based program designed to raise money for struggling New England dairy farms while educating consumers about those family businesses. Keep Local Farms urges colleges, universities, and other institutions in New England to charge a little more for milk, with the extra money going to the farmers.
SPORTS
April 14, 1987 | By PAUL DOMOWITCH, Daily News Sports Writer
Cliff Robinson has been around. Boy, has he been around. He has been around Kansas City and Cleveland and East Rutherford, N.J., and Washington and Philadelphia. He's been around five different NBA teams in eight seasons. And if you think changing ZIP codes gets any easier with practice, well, Robinson is here to tell you it doesn't. He says the pain and the anger and the resentment were every bit as strong last June, when the Washington Bullets threw him in a trade box with Jeff Ruland and shipped him to the Sixers, as they were six years ago, when the Nets swapped him to Kansas City for a shooting machine named Otis Birdsong.
NEWS
November 11, 2003 | By Ron Hutcheson INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
President Bush defended his trade policies during a visit yesterday with auto and steel workers, hours after the World Trade Organization ruled that U.S. tariffs on imported steel violate international trade laws. At a town-hall-style meeting yesterday at a BMW plant near Spartanburg, Bush said his goal was "free and fair trade" that would give U.S. workers a chance to compete with foreign workers. "My job is to make sure that we have a level playing field," he said. Bush declined to say whether he would lift the steel tariffs to avoid WTO sanctions or European Union retaliation.
NEWS
October 20, 2001 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
In 1999, Berks County Commissioners Randy Pyle and Glenn Reber appeared together on their very own all-star trading cards as "Twins" teammates - but not the Minnesota variety. They were dubbed the "Trash Twins," and their career highlights included supporting a proposed expansion of the Conestoga Landfill. Not the kind of recognition politicians welcome. But all is fair in the fight to hold elected officials accountable, according to the Pennsylvania Consumer Action Network, the group that created the cards.
NEWS
August 14, 1986 | By Enrique Candioti, Washington Post
In today's increasingly interdependent world no country, or sector of the economy, is an island, and the United States and agriculture are not exceptions to this rule. Overproduction and underconsumption are chronic symptoms of the crisis in international markets. They have been brought about by the agricultural programs of some industrialized countries in which artificial incentives, in the form of subsidies, play an important role. The root of the problem is the agricultural policy launched in the mid- 1970s by the European Economic Community, whose original and laudable intent was self-sufficiency; the actual result has been a nightmare in which the EEC, in little more than a decade, has transformed itself from a net importer of food into a major subsidized exporter.
NEWS
February 21, 2014
J OE CESA, 62, of Washington Square West, is co-owner and roaster at Philly Fair Trade Roasters, in the old Goldenberg's Peanut Chews factory on Wyoming Avenue near 2nd Street, Feltonville. The firm specializes in small-batch, organic, 100 percent Arabica coffee, hand-roasted daily and packaged in recyclable bags. Cesa formerly owned Joe Coffee on Walnut Street near 11th in Center City. Q: How did you come up with the idea for the biz? A: We started in 2002. I did a business plan, studied fair trade and wanted to do quality coffee.
LIVING
September 24, 2008 | By Lauren F. Friedman FOR THE INQUIRER
Coffee is a hot commodity. After petroleum, it's the second-most traded product in the world. Yet, while everyone knows about oil consumption's ill effects on the environment, consumers are only beginning to realize the repercussions of the approximately 110 billion cups of coffee Americans drink each year. What exactly makes an Earth-friendly cup of joe? Is it Starbucks' coffee-cup sleeve of 10 percent recycled fiber? Can you pat yourself on the back if your java joint recycles?
NEWS
March 7, 2013
K RITI SEHGAL, 29, a University of Pennsylvania grad who lives in Center City, is co-founder (with her brother, Kunal, who lives in New York) of Pure Fare. The company, launched in April 2011, provides fresh, healthy all-natural foods supported by Web tools that enable consumers to track health goals. Pure Fare has two locations: 21st Street near Walnut, and South Street above 16th, both in Center City. Q: Tell me about the idea for Pure Fare. A: It started as a technology idea.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 2012
GOGH GO Usually closed Mondays, the Philadelphia Museum of Art will be open from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. today, Presidents Day. See special exhibits "Van Gogh Up Close" and "Zoe Strauss: Ten Years. " Gift shops and cafes will be open; Granite Hill restaurant will not. GHIBLI'S BEST "The Secret World Of Arrietty," the newest movie from Japanese animation titan Studio Ghibli, hit theaters last weekend. It's an excellent excuse to rewatch or discover anew some of its older titles, especially those directed by Hayao Miyazaki, like the stunningly gorgeous "Spirited Away" or "Princess Mononoke.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 2007 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
For all that she has become over her 80 years, the ever-sexy, political, theatrical Eartha Kitt must be admired above all for her incorrigibility. While delivering everything you'd want from a cabaret star - classic popular songs, sumptuous glamour and outsized personality - her manner and method have a subversive, loose-cannon unorthodoxy that feels threatening if you don't realize she's just keeping you more attentive than relaxed. Is there anybody who leaves such an indelible imprint on your consciousness?
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 5, 2014
THE RELEASE of Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl, a captive of Islamist extremists for almost five years, is good news not only for his family but for all Americans. But the price the Obama administration paid for the 28-year-old soldier's repatriation was freedom for five detainees at Guantanamo Bay who are hardened Taliban commanders. Critics of the administration say that that price was too high, and they make three other arguments: that the exchange violated a long-standing U.S. policy of refusing to negotiate with terrorists; that this country shouldn't negotiate with the Taliban because it might legitimize the group in Afghanistan; and that the swift release of the detainees violated U.S. law. Most of these arguments are invalid or overstated.
NEWS
February 21, 2014
J OE CESA, 62, of Washington Square West, is co-owner and roaster at Philly Fair Trade Roasters, in the old Goldenberg's Peanut Chews factory on Wyoming Avenue near 2nd Street, Feltonville. The firm specializes in small-batch, organic, 100 percent Arabica coffee, hand-roasted daily and packaged in recyclable bags. Cesa formerly owned Joe Coffee on Walnut Street near 11th in Center City. Q: How did you come up with the idea for the biz? A: We started in 2002. I did a business plan, studied fair trade and wanted to do quality coffee.
NEWS
August 22, 2013
B RITTNEY "BLEW" Lewis, 25, of Kensington, owns Leotah's Place CoffeeHouse, at York and Coral streets in Kensington. Lewis, a single mom, started the business with a former business partner in 2010 as a spot where patrons could gather for coffee, conversation and community events. Q: How'd you get the idea? A: I worked at Starbucks but realized there weren't any cafes that were true community spaces in lower-income neighborhoods. I met a friend with a portable espresso machine who introduced me to direct-trade coffee.
NEWS
March 10, 2013
The Unexpected Journey of an Activist Entrepreneur and Local-Economy Pioneer By Judy Wicks Chelsea Green. 320 pp. $27.95 Reviewed by Elizabeth Eisenstadt Evans If readers want a tell-all, or a warm and highly personal account of a well-known Philadelphian's life and times in Good Morning, Beautiful Business , they are going to be disappointed. Judy Wicks saves most of her passion for topics such as fair-trade commodities, socially conscious philanthropy, and treatment of edible animals.
NEWS
March 7, 2013
K RITI SEHGAL, 29, a University of Pennsylvania grad who lives in Center City, is co-founder (with her brother, Kunal, who lives in New York) of Pure Fare. The company, launched in April 2011, provides fresh, healthy all-natural foods supported by Web tools that enable consumers to track health goals. Pure Fare has two locations: 21st Street near Walnut, and South Street above 16th, both in Center City. Q: Tell me about the idea for Pure Fare. A: It started as a technology idea.
BUSINESS
July 9, 2012 | By Lisa Rathke and ASSOCIATED PRESS
Consumers will pay a little more for coffee and chocolate to ensure that the farmers who produce those foods get a fair wage. So why not ask them to pay more for milk? That's the notion behind a Vermont-based program designed to raise money for struggling New England dairy farms while educating consumers about those family businesses. Keep Local Farms urges colleges, universities, and other institutions in New England to charge a little more for milk, with the extra money going to the farmers.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 2012
GOGH GO Usually closed Mondays, the Philadelphia Museum of Art will be open from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. today, Presidents Day. See special exhibits "Van Gogh Up Close" and "Zoe Strauss: Ten Years. " Gift shops and cafes will be open; Granite Hill restaurant will not. GHIBLI'S BEST "The Secret World Of Arrietty," the newest movie from Japanese animation titan Studio Ghibli, hit theaters last weekend. It's an excellent excuse to rewatch or discover anew some of its older titles, especially those directed by Hayao Miyazaki, like the stunningly gorgeous "Spirited Away" or "Princess Mononoke.
NEWS
June 3, 2011
Growing up, I firmly believed two things. First, I would one day be the starting power forward for the Philadelphia 76ers. Second, vegetables are bad. As I've gotten older, I've realized I lack both the height and the array of post moves to make it as an NBA starter. But the years have only affirmed my instincts about vegetables. The herbivore camp will point to the various health benefits of consuming leaves, stems, and roots. But these pale compared with the emotional, physical, and monetary costs.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 2010 | By LARI ROBLING, For the Daily News
For those who desire to vote with their food dollars in support of a different food system, Milk & Honey Market at 45th Street and Baltimore Avenue is a good option. The market focuses on locavore, whose definition depends on whom you ask. For some, it means adding as much fresh and local foods to the shopping cart as possible. Others have geographic boundaries - eating or drinking nothing that comes from beyond a 150-mile radius or, in the extreme, 50 miles. I'll admit my bias here.
LIVING
September 24, 2008 | By Lauren F. Friedman FOR THE INQUIRER
Coffee is a hot commodity. After petroleum, it's the second-most traded product in the world. Yet, while everyone knows about oil consumption's ill effects on the environment, consumers are only beginning to realize the repercussions of the approximately 110 billion cups of coffee Americans drink each year. What exactly makes an Earth-friendly cup of joe? Is it Starbucks' coffee-cup sleeve of 10 percent recycled fiber? Can you pat yourself on the back if your java joint recycles?
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