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Fair Value

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SPORTS
July 15, 1998 | By Jim Salisbury, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
There are a number of teams around major-league baseball that could use a guy like Mark Leiter in their bullpen. But wresting the revitalized reliever from the Phillies' clutches isn't going to be easy. In fact, manager Terry Francona isn't sure there's a team out there that can give the Phillies enough for them to part with Leiter. "I don't think it's going to happen," said Francona, when asked yesterday about trade rumors surrounding Leiter. "When you look at what Leit has done for us numbers-wise, I don't know if we could get enough in return for him. I don't know if we'd get fair value.
BUSINESS
May 18, 2008 | By Harold Brubaker INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
New accounting rules are causing bizarre gyrations on financial statements and giving some companies a bottom-line boost when their credit goes bad. Radian Group Inc. took a $1.33 billion hit in its first-quarter earnings from the decline in the value of insurancelike products it sold and was liable for. That part is not new. What's new is, the Philadelphia insurer of mortgages and bonds last week had to take the market's perception of...
BUSINESS
January 15, 2002 | By Bob Fernandez INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Right Management Consultants Inc., which provides counseling and job-search services to laid-off workers, has reached an agreement to acquire a European outplacement company for $108 million. The deal will make Right Management, which is based in Philadelphia, the largest outplacement-service provider in Europe, said Richard J. Pinola, Right Management's chairman and chief executive officer. "This solidifies our European position," Pinola said. "One of the places we were No. 2 was Europe, and now we're No. 1. " Right Management will take over Coutts Consulting Group, of London, which is expected to have had $92 million in revenue last year.
NEWS
August 12, 1994 | by Yvette Ousley, Daily News Staff Writer Staff writer Earni Young contributed to this report
Mayor Rendell's chief aide has criticized a School District proposal to buy a Center City office building, saying the seller would turn a quick profit. But school officials deny the accusation, saying the venture is a great opportunity to consolidate operations at several other locations and save on rent. The expense of leasing office space would apparently cover the purchase, schools officials say. "None of this makes sense," said David L. Cohen, Mayor Rendell's chief of staff.
NEWS
November 12, 2009 | By Vernon Clark INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For William Park and other residents of his block in Southwest Philadelphia, a water-main break early yesterday was an all-too-familiar source of frustration. The 30-inch pipe broke about 3 a.m. at Lindbergh Boulevard and 64th Street, sending thousands of gallons of water into the 2800 block of 64th Street, flooding rowhouse basements and heavily damaging their contents. A water main broke at nearly the exact location July 11, causing similar woes. Yesterday's break caused Lindbergh Boulevard to buckle and created a crater at 64th Street.
BUSINESS
April 28, 2005 | By Bob Fernandez INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
DuPont Co. shareholders rejected a shareholder proposal yesterday that would have forced the company to disclose its costs for lobbying, expert advice and public relations in dealing with a chemical used in the manufacture of Teflon that has been linked to cancer in animals and has alarmed environmentalists. DuPont said it had studied the chemical, widely known as PFOA, and concluded that it was safe. Shareholders voted against the proposal by 91.3 percent to 8.7 percent. Responding to comments at the meeting in Wilmington, chief executive officer Charles O. Holliday Jr. said DuPont found "no ill health effects from PFOA.
BUSINESS
January 7, 2010 | By Christopher K. Hepp INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In court documents filed this week, Philadelphia Newspapers L.L.C. and its largest creditors argued anew over whether the company had a right to know how much debt each lender held and at what price it was purchased. From the company's position, the information is central to establishing a fair-market value for the media firm, which owns The Inquirer, the Philadelphia Daily News, and Philly.com. Its senior lenders contend that the demand is designed to keep them from bidding on the company, thus promoting the chances of the current management's retaining control.
NEWS
April 2, 1998
Take one urban community, overflowing with school-age children, in need of a bigger school. Add a fire-gutted, debris-laden former factory bought in 1995 for $66,923 by a community activist who works for a state politician. Add appraisals that now value the site at $1 million or more. Result: A foul stew of money, politics and misplaced priorities. That's a helping of outrage the School District of Philadelphia had best not serve at a time it's fighting to get more state aid from a legislature that is at best indifferent and often hostile.
BUSINESS
March 27, 2014 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
The stock market has been hitting record highs - again - but which sectors are overpriced and which still represent opportunity? We checked in with Chris Millard, investment specialist at J.P. Morgan Private Bank in Philadelphia. Overall, he is advising clients that "equities are not cheap anymore, they're probably at fair value. But some sectors are more overvalued and some are still undervalued. " Among those overvalued sectors are real estate investment trusts (REITs) and utilities, Millard said, as well as conservative stocks with high dividend yields.
SPORTS
July 31, 1995 | by Kevin Mulligan, Daily News Sports Writer
The Eagles are practically finished waiting and wondering and hoping and playing negotiating games with linebacker Byron Evans and his agent. That was the message delivered loudly and clearly by Eagles owner Jeffrey Lurie yesterday following an uneventful intrasquad game of touch football before approximately 11,500 sunbathers at Lehigh University in Bethlehem. "I think it's time we really move on and prepare for the season," Lurie said. "We've gone very far and it's time Byron expresses whether he wants to be on the Eagles or not. He knows we want him. It's now time to move on. " Bob Ackles, the Eagles' director of football administration who is Lurie's point man in the negotiations, relayed Lurie's message to Burt Kinerk, Evans's agent, last night upon the team's return to West Chester.
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BUSINESS
March 27, 2014 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
The stock market has been hitting record highs - again - but which sectors are overpriced and which still represent opportunity? We checked in with Chris Millard, investment specialist at J.P. Morgan Private Bank in Philadelphia. Overall, he is advising clients that "equities are not cheap anymore, they're probably at fair value. But some sectors are more overvalued and some are still undervalued. " Among those overvalued sectors are real estate investment trusts (REITs) and utilities, Millard said, as well as conservative stocks with high dividend yields.
NEWS
June 18, 2013
With Wall Street's awaiting the Federal Reserve's statement after its two-day meeting concludes Wednesday, you'd think there was a Super Bowl of money at stake. And there is. But some investors are tired of the rules of the game - they want to see the referees stop determining the score. Investors would like to witness the Fed's purchases of bonds to come to an end, so the stock and fixed-income market distortions can stop and allow the economy to function without interference.
NEWS
April 6, 2012 | By George Anastasia, Inquirer Staff Writer
What's a 9,000-square-foot beachfront property in Avalon worth? Depends on who's doing the math. In a convoluted legal dispute settled last week, a Superior Court judge in Cape May County has ordered the Borough of Avalon to pay a Moorestown couple $284,802 for a 90- by 100-foot lot at the end of 75th Street that the borough seized without compensation in 1965. Edward and Nancy Klumpp had sought $5.5 million, based on current real estate values. The Klumpps lost a six-bedroom home on the site in the great storm of 1962.
BUSINESS
January 7, 2010 | By Christopher K. Hepp INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In court documents filed this week, Philadelphia Newspapers L.L.C. and its largest creditors argued anew over whether the company had a right to know how much debt each lender held and at what price it was purchased. From the company's position, the information is central to establishing a fair-market value for the media firm, which owns The Inquirer, the Philadelphia Daily News, and Philly.com. Its senior lenders contend that the demand is designed to keep them from bidding on the company, thus promoting the chances of the current management's retaining control.
NEWS
November 12, 2009 | By Vernon Clark INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For William Park and other residents of his block in Southwest Philadelphia, a water-main break early yesterday was an all-too-familiar source of frustration. The 30-inch pipe broke about 3 a.m. at Lindbergh Boulevard and 64th Street, sending thousands of gallons of water into the 2800 block of 64th Street, flooding rowhouse basements and heavily damaging their contents. A water main broke at nearly the exact location July 11, causing similar woes. Yesterday's break caused Lindbergh Boulevard to buckle and created a crater at 64th Street.
SPORTS
July 1, 2009
TODAY WOULD BE one of those days where it would be good for the 76ers if point guard Andre Miller were a little less unusual. Miller has never revealed a lot about himself during his tenure with the Sixers, and it was always hard for fans, management and his teammates to get a read on what exactly was going through his mind. Does he like Philadelphia? Does he want to remain a Sixer? Is he happy with the progress of the program? Yes, no, maybe so. It depended on how you interpreted what Miller might have said on any particular day. And that was fine when Miller was under contract and the Sixers had final say in whether he would stay or go. That all changed at the end of the season when Miller became an unrestricted free agent with the autonomy to decide his next NBA destination.
BUSINESS
August 11, 2008 | By Chris Mondics INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Natalie D. Ramsey has handled bankruptcies through two recessions, so far. As chair of the Bankruptcy and Corporate Restructuring Practice of Montgomery, McCracken, Walker & Rhoads L.L.P. of Philadelphia, she also has had a close-up view of the bankruptcy practice as it has changed in recent years. Her work is composed of corporate reorganization, restructurings, commercial transactions and other aspects of bankruptcy practice. Question: How did bankruptcy early in your career compare with what you're seeing now?
BUSINESS
May 18, 2008 | By Harold Brubaker INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
New accounting rules are causing bizarre gyrations on financial statements and giving some companies a bottom-line boost when their credit goes bad. Radian Group Inc. took a $1.33 billion hit in its first-quarter earnings from the decline in the value of insurancelike products it sold and was liable for. That part is not new. What's new is, the Philadelphia insurer of mortgages and bonds last week had to take the market's perception of...
BUSINESS
April 28, 2005 | By Bob Fernandez INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
DuPont Co. shareholders rejected a shareholder proposal yesterday that would have forced the company to disclose its costs for lobbying, expert advice and public relations in dealing with a chemical used in the manufacture of Teflon that has been linked to cancer in animals and has alarmed environmentalists. DuPont said it had studied the chemical, widely known as PFOA, and concluded that it was safe. Shareholders voted against the proposal by 91.3 percent to 8.7 percent. Responding to comments at the meeting in Wilmington, chief executive officer Charles O. Holliday Jr. said DuPont found "no ill health effects from PFOA.
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