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Fair Warning

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NEWS
August 7, 2010 | By DANA DiFILIPPO, difilid@phillynews.com 215-854-5934
THE SIGN on the door into famed forensic sculptor Frank Bender's studio announces: "So this isn't home sweet home, adjust. " It's fair warning, given the sights inside. A rifle hangs suspended from the ceiling. "My father-in-law shot at me with that when I was dating his daughter," Bender says, beaming. "He missed my head by inches. " Handcuffs and two guns dangle alongside pans from a pot rack above the stovetop where Bender used to boil skulls in his pasta pot to deflesh them for reconstruction.
NEWS
May 7, 1986
One does not have to be an avid reader of Playboy or Penthouse to be gravely concerned about the pressure that has been applied to 7-Eleven's parent corporation to intimidate it into not selling these magazines. If a group of bigoted, narrow-minded, self-righteous fanatics can today pressure people not to sell "skin" magazines, then tomorrow they can block the sale of magazines that do not agree with them politically, and eventually our sacred constitutional rights to free speech, free press and free expression will be destroyed - not from without but from within.
NEWS
October 20, 2010 | By Sam Wood, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A South Jersey man, who used the Internet pseudonym "Devilfish," admitted Wednesday that he had sent death threats to employees of five civil rights organizations via the Internet, federal authorities said. Vincent Johnson, 61, of Brick, told a U.S. District Judge in Trenton that he e-mailed nearly 20 threatening messages, among which included: "I am giving you fair warning that your presence and position is being tracked . . . you are dead meat . . . along with anyone else in your organization;" "Our guns are ready to take you out;" and "Do you have a last will and testament?
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 2012 | By David Hiltbrand, Inquirer Staff Writer
Comedy Central has a killers' row of new stand-up specials Saturday night with Daniel Tosh followed by Patton Oswalt and topped off with Paul F. Tompkins. How's it feel to be batting cleanup in that lineup, Paul? "I'm not sure how ratings work," says Tompkins, laughing. "I don't know if I'm headlining or sweeping up. " You can be pretty sure the comedian won't get lost in the shuffle. He's staked his life on it. Growing up as the second youngest in a raucous family of six in Mount Airy, Tompkins learned early that being funny was an ideal way to get noticed.
NEWS
May 1, 1996 | By Linda Loyd, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If you live in Philadelphia and try to beat high insurance rates by registering your car in New Jersey, the Poconos, or somewhere else - beware! Your scamming days might be over. District Attorney Lynne M. Abraham served notice yesterday: You have one month - until June 1 - to give your insurance company the right address, or you could be fined and possibly end up in jail. In a city where half of all drivers have no car insurance at all, Abraham is upset that "many, many thousands" of those who are insured claim to live elsewhere - at the Jersey Shore, the Poconos, or in the suburbs.
NEWS
January 1, 1990 | By ABE ZAIDAN
I see where a group named ManWatchers Inc. has projected Kevin Costner, the actor, as the man of the '90s for being "natural, comfortably masculine and sexy. " ManWatchers figures those will be the ascendant qualities of '90s-type men. Well, fair warning. I have already let several decades slip by without being told what would be expected of me on the eve of the next one. So in retrospect, we can now see that a '40s-type man would be a soldier and a busy contributor to the baby boom; a '50s type would be a GI Bill student and dutifully conventional without asking many questions; a '60s type would be defiant of all institutions, even his father's stock portfolios; a '70s type would seek refuge from political upheaval by returning to cookouts and managing Little League baseball; and the '80s type would be an upbeat Reaganite who aspired to a computer in the country with a heavily mortgaged split-level built around it. Now, says ManWatchers, make room for the Kevin Costner image.
NEWS
September 11, 1998 | by Dave Davies, Daily News Staff Writer
Maybe it's easier because he doesn't have to run for re-election this year. But Mayor Rendell is one Democrat who is not deserting his president, and he's warning Congress to think twice about casting stones. "Did you ever hear the song, 'Harper Valley PTA?' " Rendell asked reporters yesterday. "It's time for the people who are in high places who are criticizing the president to put that in their tape decks and listen to it. " The song by Jeannie C. Riley tells the story of a single parent who silences her moral critics at a PTA meeting by revealing skeletons in leading citizens' closets.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 28, 1989 | By Sherryl Connelly, New York Daily News
One day Walter Hunsicker steps out of the rain into the doorway of a medical-supply shop where he is importuned by a shabby little man who wants change. Not spare, not loose, but major, even cosmic, as in changing Hunsicker's past. Hunsicker, chief copy editor at a publishing house, says no, but in a Thomas Berger novel ("Neighbors") resisting the pull of bizarre events never works. And so, in Berger's latest "Changing the Past" (Little, Brown, $18.95) Hunsicker finds himself taking part in the little man's grand experiment (the nature of which is never explained, but that's life)
NEWS
July 16, 2006
N.J. deserves it Re: "Shutdown was avoidable," July 6: I have no sympathy for the mess that New Jersey residents found themselves in. It's not like they didn't have fair warning of what Democrats do when they win the governorship. They elected Jim Florio, who implemented a staggering tax increase. Jim McGreevey followed suit with an increase of his own, and now they've elected Jon Corzine despite the warnings given during the election campaign. Tax hike after tax hike, New Jersey just never seems to catch up with its spending.
SPORTS
September 19, 1988 | By Les Bowen, Daily News Sports Writer
The first U.S. gold medal of the 1988 Summer Olympics technically did not count as such - it was won in the demonstration sport of Taekwondo. Arlene Limas, a student at De Paul University, surprised everybody by besting South Korea's Kim Ji Sook in the women's welterweight final. Early today, another U.S. woman won a gold in the sport. Dana Hee, of Redwood City, Calif., defeated Karin Schwartz, of Denmark, in the lightweight division. Limas certainly surprised the folks running Gymnastics Hall.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 2012 | By David Hiltbrand, Inquirer Staff Writer
Comedy Central has a killers' row of new stand-up specials Saturday night with Daniel Tosh followed by Patton Oswalt and topped off with Paul F. Tompkins. How's it feel to be batting cleanup in that lineup, Paul? "I'm not sure how ratings work," says Tompkins, laughing. "I don't know if I'm headlining or sweeping up. " You can be pretty sure the comedian won't get lost in the shuffle. He's staked his life on it. Growing up as the second youngest in a raucous family of six in Mount Airy, Tompkins learned early that being funny was an ideal way to get noticed.
NEWS
October 20, 2010 | By Sam Wood, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A South Jersey man, who used the Internet pseudonym "Devilfish," admitted Wednesday that he had sent death threats to employees of five civil rights organizations via the Internet, federal authorities said. Vincent Johnson, 61, of Brick, told a U.S. District Judge in Trenton that he e-mailed nearly 20 threatening messages, among which included: "I am giving you fair warning that your presence and position is being tracked . . . you are dead meat . . . along with anyone else in your organization;" "Our guns are ready to take you out;" and "Do you have a last will and testament?
NEWS
August 7, 2010 | By DANA DiFILIPPO, difilid@phillynews.com 215-854-5934
THE SIGN on the door into famed forensic sculptor Frank Bender's studio announces: "So this isn't home sweet home, adjust. " It's fair warning, given the sights inside. A rifle hangs suspended from the ceiling. "My father-in-law shot at me with that when I was dating his daughter," Bender says, beaming. "He missed my head by inches. " Handcuffs and two guns dangle alongside pans from a pot rack above the stovetop where Bender used to boil skulls in his pasta pot to deflesh them for reconstruction.
NEWS
July 16, 2006
N.J. deserves it Re: "Shutdown was avoidable," July 6: I have no sympathy for the mess that New Jersey residents found themselves in. It's not like they didn't have fair warning of what Democrats do when they win the governorship. They elected Jim Florio, who implemented a staggering tax increase. Jim McGreevey followed suit with an increase of his own, and now they've elected Jon Corzine despite the warnings given during the election campaign. Tax hike after tax hike, New Jersey just never seems to catch up with its spending.
NEWS
June 13, 2002 | By Andrea Gerlin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When bidding opened on a Victorian masterpiece at Christie's auction house here last night, the most anxious person in the room was a 12-year-old Connecticut schoolboy. Bingham Bryant wiped his brow and fidgeted as the auction featuring "Important British Art" got under way. Earlier he had nearly interrupted bidding when he raised his hand to wave across the red octagonal auction room to one of the young friends accompanying him. You'll forgive young Bingham from Old Lyme; that's his discovery, after all, that's going up for auction.
NEWS
December 8, 1999
Can you finish this sentence? "You have the right to remain. . . " Most Americans can. They know the first few lines of the Miranda warnings by heart, courtesy of three decades of television police dramas - not to mention the United States Supreme Court. The court ruled in 1966 that confessions given by a convict named Ernesto Miranda and three others could not be considered voluntary. The defendants weren't properly warned that they had a right to remain silent and a right to an attorney, and so their Fifth Amendment rights against self-incrimination were violated.
NEWS
August 12, 1999
It's hard to believe that all 5,962 Philadelphia welfare recipients who didn't respond to warning letters sent months ago are flouting work requirements intentionally. Yet some are. And their cash benefits should be cut off. Immediately. It isn't fair to thousands of recipients who follow the new rules to let others get away with "gaming the system. " But because of the state's flawed approach to welfare reform, it's difficult to separate the slackers from those who haven't responded for legitimate reasons.
NEWS
September 11, 1998 | by Dave Davies, Daily News Staff Writer
Maybe it's easier because he doesn't have to run for re-election this year. But Mayor Rendell is one Democrat who is not deserting his president, and he's warning Congress to think twice about casting stones. "Did you ever hear the song, 'Harper Valley PTA?' " Rendell asked reporters yesterday. "It's time for the people who are in high places who are criticizing the president to put that in their tape decks and listen to it. " The song by Jeannie C. Riley tells the story of a single parent who silences her moral critics at a PTA meeting by revealing skeletons in leading citizens' closets.
NEWS
May 1, 1996 | By Linda Loyd, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If you live in Philadelphia and try to beat high insurance rates by registering your car in New Jersey, the Poconos, or somewhere else - beware! Your scamming days might be over. District Attorney Lynne M. Abraham served notice yesterday: You have one month - until June 1 - to give your insurance company the right address, or you could be fined and possibly end up in jail. In a city where half of all drivers have no car insurance at all, Abraham is upset that "many, many thousands" of those who are insured claim to live elsewhere - at the Jersey Shore, the Poconos, or in the suburbs.
NEWS
October 9, 1993 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If, as some people believe, the Phillies play best when they're in a foul mood, then pity the Braves when the National League championship series resumes this afternoon. The 14-3 drubbing the Phillies took Thursday night was bad enough. Then, as soon as they got here yesterday, they had to put up with . . . Atlanta fans. And, worse, the Atlanta media. First came an airport wise guy who got smart with Lenny Dykstra. Next came the local papers, cackling that the Phils were fat, ugly and uncouth and urging Atlantans to "hide the women and children.
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