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Fairmount Water Works

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NEWS
March 9, 2001 | By Elisa Ung INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The opening date for the restored Fairmount Water Works, the architectural marvel on the Schuylkill, has been pushed back to Sept. 8, Fairmount Park officials said. The park commission had hoped to reopen the complex to the public in June, but plans to widen two roads adjacent to the site have taken longer than expected, said William Mifflin, the commission's executive director. Construction will begin soon on Aquarium Drive and Fairmount Avenue, which link the complex to Kelly Drive, between the Philadelphia Museum of Art and Boathouse Row. The owners of the site's 200-seat restaurant also needed more time to complete their plans and will open the restaurant by the fall, Mifflin said.
NEWS
December 13, 2013 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
It seems an unlikely place for a performance: three deep, concrete trenches, aqua- and ochre-streaked walls, a slightly ribbed, concrete ceiling. Ancient graffiti is scrawled along the trench walls - 1977, ZEP, ROO, MIK, JIM. Decayed paint is largely scraped away. A turbulent river roils just outside arched windows. Yet, this is the place, the old Kelly Pool beneath the historic Fairmount Water Works, unused and deteriorating since it was swamped by Hurricane Agnes in 1972, where one of the city's newest and least likely impresarios will present the world premiere of a cantata.
NEWS
September 21, 2000 | By Dwight Ott, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Delaware River Port Authority approved about $1 million in funding yesterday for the Fairmount Water Works Interpretive Center on the Schuylkill and $1.5 million for a Port Richmond neighborhood business-development project. The 16-member commission also unanimously authorized almost $600,000 for the Cooper's Ferry Development Corp. to study development along the waterfront in Camden. Ed Grusheski, a spokesman for the Philadelphia Water Department, said after yesterday's meeting that the Fairmount center was important in educating the public about cleaning up the environment.
NEWS
November 23, 2012
ON SATURDAY, I found myself at the starting line of the 5th annual Philadelphia Tweed Ride at the Fairmount Water Works behind the Art Museum. The riders wore knickers, bowler hats and other throwbacks to the turn of the 20th century. Some had vintage bikes. From maxed mustaches to fur collars, their style was definitely ready to roll. Email: Bigrube@streetgazing.com " @BigRubeHarley Blog: streetgazing.com
NEWS
November 18, 1997
In a town where civic renewal demands near-biblical patience, the Fairmount Water Works long ranked near the top of the list of longest-suffering good causes. Then last week, manna fell upon the stately complex of neoclassical buildings by Boathouse Row on the Schuylkill - in the form of a $4 million grant from the hometown Pew Charitable Trusts. Combine that gift with $1.3 million from the other big local philanthropy, the William Penn Foundation, and an additional $4.5 million from the city and state, and this Fairmount Park Commission project is well on the way. When it's completed, not only will the main structures and grounds be spruced up and beautifully illuminated, but a 200-seat restaurant will be in place - awaiting an operator.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 23, 2005 | By Dana Reddington INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Delaware's two resident dinosaurs are having a two-day house party, filled with activities for young people. The prehistoric creatures reside at the Delaware Museum of Natural History in Wilmington, which is hosting Dino Days Tuesday and Wednesday. The idea, museum spokeswoman Joey Outten says, is to "celebrate the only dinosaurs in Delaware on permanent display. " The event, which was on hiatus last year while the museum was closed for renovations, features dino-themed crafts, a fossil dig, face-painting, educational talks about "weird prehistoric birds," and live animals such as raptors and reptiles from the Woodford Cedar Run Wildlife Refuge in Medford.
NEWS
October 19, 1997 | By Walter F. Naedele, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Joe Greco was painting a river scene behind the Philadelphia Art Museum yesterday afternoon. And he was not happy. "To me, this has always been like a little Athens," he said of the several small buildings that make up the historic site known as the Fairmount Water Works. But, he said, "I'm shocked at the state of it. " The crumbling balustrades and peeling colonnades looked far better on the canvas on Greco's easel than in the unkind light of reality. Nearby, a noontime ceremony had just ended, marking the 25th anniversary of the federal Clean Water Act. The river that Greco was painting had been rescued from the decay of pollution, the speakers said.
NEWS
April 16, 1990
It might be better if a large number of companies had come forward with proposals to put a restaurant in the Fairmount Water Works, instead of just one. But as luck would have it the company that did come forward is ably equipped to handle the job. Chart House Inc., which does more than $150 million in business at 71 restaurants (including a very successful one at Penn's Landing), has put forth a preliminary plan for putting in a restaurant and completing restoration of the Water Works that looks good.
NEWS
July 23, 2005 | By Stephan Salisbury INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For the most part, the city Water Department is just happy with a relatively clean Schuylkill. But tomorrow, clean will be augmented by some New Age good vibes. At 1 p.m., the Fairmount Water Works, where the department's educational center is located, will serve as site for the "World Day of Love and Thanks to Water," an annual rite promoted by Masaru Emoto. A Japanese-based researcher and photographer, Emoto believes that concentrated thought and soothing words change the molecular structure of water.
NEWS
October 13, 2004 | By Stephan Salisbury INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Joseph R. Syrnick, the city's chief engineer and surveyor, has been named executive director of the Schuylkill River Development Corp., the lead agency working to revitalize the riverfront. "I have followed the Schuylkill River Development Corp. and its progress over the last dozen years and believe the project has enormous economic and social potential for our city," said Syrnick, who is also a member of the Fairmount Park Commission. The creation of the Schuylkill River Park has been the main focus of the nonprofit corporation over the last decade.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 20, 2014 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Water Department, generally attentive to unusual drips and noisy leaks, has decided to let the waters flow. On Sunday, the city's most unlikely impresario continues its flirtation with the arts by staging a festival at the Fairmount Water Works, the neoclassical gem on the bank of the Schuylkill behind the Philadelphia Museum of Art. Often a subject of art, the Water Works in recent years also has hosted artists, serving as a venue for a...
NEWS
December 13, 2013 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
It seems an unlikely place for a performance: three deep, concrete trenches, aqua- and ochre-streaked walls, a slightly ribbed, concrete ceiling. Ancient graffiti is scrawled along the trench walls - 1977, ZEP, ROO, MIK, JIM. Decayed paint is largely scraped away. A turbulent river roils just outside arched windows. Yet, this is the place, the old Kelly Pool beneath the historic Fairmount Water Works, unused and deteriorating since it was swamped by Hurricane Agnes in 1972, where one of the city's newest and least likely impresarios will present the world premiere of a cantata.
NEWS
November 25, 2012
Beth Kephart is the author of 14 books, including "Flow: The Life and Times of Philadelphia's Schuylkill River" (Temple University Press) Of the two rivers that carry Philadelphia's dreams toward the sea, it is the Schuylkill that has always snagged a good chunk of my heart. It feels personal to me - the Schuylkill's roving through time, her baptisms and floods, her primeval sheen, her helpless submission to toxins and sludge, her muddy regrets and redemption. The river rises and falls.
NEWS
November 23, 2012
ON SATURDAY, I found myself at the starting line of the 5th annual Philadelphia Tweed Ride at the Fairmount Water Works behind the Art Museum. The riders wore knickers, bowler hats and other throwbacks to the turn of the 20th century. Some had vintage bikes. From maxed mustaches to fur collars, their style was definitely ready to roll. Email: Bigrube@streetgazing.com " @BigRubeHarley Blog: streetgazing.com
NEWS
November 12, 2010
The editorial on the city's proposed amphibious tour ramp on the Schuylkill correctly highlighted many of the advantages of allowing the Ducks on the Schuylkill, but your discussion of the drawbacks was ill-informed ("Quacky idea for boats," Sunday). The claim that "the boats could not be allowed back on the Delaware" is simply inaccurate. The U.S. Coast Guard long ago cleared our vessels to resume operations on the Delaware. We share the Coast Guard's confidence that our tour can be operated safely.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 19, 2008 | By Robert Strauss FOR THE INQUIRER
Even Ben Franklin, who often put up with a whole lot, could not stand the stench and filth of Dock Creek. Tanneries and slaughterhouses dotted the waterway, along what would become Walnut, Chestnut, Third, Fourth and Fifth Streets. Quite often, skins, dyes, and even the random hoof would float by homes and taverns, which added their waste to the stream. As early as the 1740s, what might be called the early Philadelphia environmentalists, including Franklin, started Philadelphia's initial sewer system, covering much of the creek as it meandered down to the docks, for which it was named, along the Delaware River.
NEWS
July 9, 2006 | By Stephan Salisbury INQUIRER CULTURE WRITER
It's been battered, flooded, graffitied and burned. It's been inundated with garbage and weed trees, suffered theft and vandalism, decay and collapse. Despite it all, like the city and the park it gave birth to, the Fairmount Water Works has survived, a wreath of possibility on the Schuylkill. Now, barring any more last-minute unexpected riptides, the neoclassical landmark stretching along the river below the Philadelphia Museum of Art will see its largest jewel - the 1812 Engine House - open within the next several days as a restaurant.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 23, 2005 | By Dana Reddington INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Delaware's two resident dinosaurs are having a two-day house party, filled with activities for young people. The prehistoric creatures reside at the Delaware Museum of Natural History in Wilmington, which is hosting Dino Days Tuesday and Wednesday. The idea, museum spokeswoman Joey Outten says, is to "celebrate the only dinosaurs in Delaware on permanent display. " The event, which was on hiatus last year while the museum was closed for renovations, features dino-themed crafts, a fossil dig, face-painting, educational talks about "weird prehistoric birds," and live animals such as raptors and reptiles from the Woodford Cedar Run Wildlife Refuge in Medford.
NEWS
November 23, 2005 | By Michael Currie Schaffer INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The rain was falling and the weather was frigid when the tour boat passed under a decrepit bridge and past a giant refrigeration plant. So, a passenger asked the tour guide, just what was that low, yellow building off to the starboard side? "This is one of the few properties on the river that's zoned for prisons," said Louise Turan, executive director of the Schuylkill River Development Corp. But in keeping with her group's mission to celebrate and transform the river that's long been the ugly stepchild of Philadelphia waterways, Turan hastened to note that the building was not now a jail.
NEWS
July 23, 2005 | By Stephan Salisbury INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For the most part, the city Water Department is just happy with a relatively clean Schuylkill. But tomorrow, clean will be augmented by some New Age good vibes. At 1 p.m., the Fairmount Water Works, where the department's educational center is located, will serve as site for the "World Day of Love and Thanks to Water," an annual rite promoted by Masaru Emoto. A Japanese-based researcher and photographer, Emoto believes that concentrated thought and soothing words change the molecular structure of water.
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