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Faith Based Initiative

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NEWS
April 27, 2006 | By John J. DiIulio Jr
President Bush has repeatedly called supporting religious groups that help the poor "the most important domestic initiative of my presidency. " Last year, Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton (D., N.Y.) preached in Boston that nobody "is more likely" to serve the needy than "someone who sees God at work. " Rather than continue to "have a false . . . debate about the role of faith-based institutions," she insisted, we should "provide the support that is needed on an ongoing basis. " Amen, but President Bill Clinton signed the first relevant federal law in 1996, President Bush's faith-based initiative began in 2001, and Washington still has not come close to providing "the support that is needed on an ongoing basis.
NEWS
July 14, 2001 | By E.J. Dionne Jr
President Bush's faith-based initiative is in deep trouble because it lacks a constituency committed to its success and because every move the administration makes to appease the idea's opponents weakens support from likely allies. It is ironic that an idea Bush used so well in his campaign is drawing assaults from left to right. In the campaign, religious conservatives warmed to Bush's arguments that programs rooted in faith could fight poverty by changing hearts. And moderate voters appreciated a Republican who insisted he wanted to promote compassion, not just tax cuts.
NEWS
July 12, 2001 | By Jane R. Eisner
A few months ago, before legislation to implement President Bush's faith-based initiative even made it up the street to Congress, the political storm clouds were gathering. Already there was consternation over whether religious charities receiving federal money would have to abide by local antidiscrimination laws against homosexuals. The issue had the potential to pit two core American values - religious freedom and civil rights - against each other. That debate would be so explosive - and the current law is so murky - that most supporters of the faith-based initiative hoped the dispute would simply go away.
NEWS
April 8, 2013
J. David Kuo, 44, an evangelical Christian conservative and former top official of President George W. Bush's faith-based initiative who drew wide attention when he publicly accused the administration of failing to live up to the values it espoused, died Friday in Charlotte, N.C. He was diagnosed a decade ago with brain cancer, his wife, Kimberly, said. After leaving his post as deputy director of the White House Office of Faith-Based and Community Initiatives in 2003, Mr. Kuo became an open critic of that operation.
NEWS
July 6, 2008
Democratic presidential candidate Barack Obama's announcement last week that he, like President Bush, wants government to bankroll faith-based efforts to help America's downtrodden is being written off by some as a political ploy. Let's hope not. The work that could be done is too important. Both Obama and Republican candidate John McCain have had a hard time gaining traction with evangelical Christians, whose votes could be key in several battleground states. Some polls show as many as 10 percent of Americans think Obama, whose father was a Kenyan Muslim, is also Muslim.
NEWS
July 26, 2001 | By Jane R. Eisner
At about 10:15 this morning, U.S. Sen. Joseph I. Lieberman (D., Conn.) is scheduled to meet with President Bush to discuss the administration's struggling faith-based initiative. There's an amusing aspect to this high-stakes conversation. Bush desperately needs Lieberman if there's any hope that his administration's signature initiative will make it through the Congress in a recognizable, workable form. That's Joe Lieberman, the guy whose team was a court decision away from beating Bush/Cheney and who clearly is considering a run for the White House himself.
NEWS
August 21, 2001
THE MOST REASSURING thing about the constitutional swamp created by President Bush's "faith-based initiative" was its leadership: respected Penn professor John DiIulio. DiIulio's frustrating trek through this Washington bog has reaffirmed most of our misgivings about the notion that you can provide government money to religious organizations without compromising both government and religion. Now that DiIulio has resigned, citing commuter's exhaustion, a short history of his short tenure suggests that the devil really was in the details.
NEWS
July 28, 2008 | By Rev. Barry W. Lynn
President George W. Bush's "faith-based" initiative has been a disaster. It has permitted taxpayer funding of religious groups that engage in rank forms of hiring discrimination, and it has failed to take seriously the issue of proselytism occurring on the taxpayer's dime. Religious groups, of course, have the right to discriminate with their own funds. A Catholic church, for example, does not have to hire a Baptist minister as its pastor. But when tax funds are added to the mix, the rules change dramatically.
NEWS
January 16, 2004 | By William Douglas INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
President Bush placed a wreath at the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s grave yesterday to a chorus of boos from hundreds of mostly African American demonstrators, who felt that Bush's policies run counter to the civil rights leader's beliefs. Bush's visit to the grave site on what would have been King's 75th birthday also bothered some African American lawmakers, who characterized the appearance as a hollow gesture. The President won only 8 percent of the black vote in 2000, and yesterday's appearance suggested it will be difficult for him to do better in 2004.
NEWS
November 6, 2003 | By Jim Remsen INQUIRER FAITH LIFE EDITOR
In a challenge to President Bush's controversial faith-based initiative, researchers reported yesterday that a three-year study found job-training clients had fared better overall with secular programs than religious ones. The Charitable Choice Research Project, the largest of its kind to date, focused on government-funded programs in Indiana, Massachusetts and North Carolina. Its results run contrary to the assertion of many religious groups and their advocates that faith-based programs are more effective than their secular counterparts.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 8, 2013
J. David Kuo, 44, an evangelical Christian conservative and former top official of President George W. Bush's faith-based initiative who drew wide attention when he publicly accused the administration of failing to live up to the values it espoused, died Friday in Charlotte, N.C. He was diagnosed a decade ago with brain cancer, his wife, Kimberly, said. After leaving his post as deputy director of the White House Office of Faith-Based and Community Initiatives in 2003, Mr. Kuo became an open critic of that operation.
NEWS
April 12, 2009 | By David O'Reilly INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Barack Obama had been president barely two weeks when he revived one of George W. Bush's most controversial programs - a bold fusion of federal money and organized religion in service to America's downtrodden. The "faith-based initiative" funded by Washington and carried out by a sectarian "army of compassion," Bush often said, was his most important domestic creation. It outlived his administration, though with hints of change on the horizon. "There is a force for good greater than government," Obama said in naming a 26-year-old Pentecostal pastor as director of his White House Office for Faith-Based and Neighborhood Partnerships.
NEWS
July 28, 2008 | By Rev. Barry W. Lynn
President George W. Bush's "faith-based" initiative has been a disaster. It has permitted taxpayer funding of religious groups that engage in rank forms of hiring discrimination, and it has failed to take seriously the issue of proselytism occurring on the taxpayer's dime. Religious groups, of course, have the right to discriminate with their own funds. A Catholic church, for example, does not have to hire a Baptist minister as its pastor. But when tax funds are added to the mix, the rules change dramatically.
NEWS
July 6, 2008
Democratic presidential candidate Barack Obama's announcement last week that he, like President Bush, wants government to bankroll faith-based efforts to help America's downtrodden is being written off by some as a political ploy. Let's hope not. The work that could be done is too important. Both Obama and Republican candidate John McCain have had a hard time gaining traction with evangelical Christians, whose votes could be key in several battleground states. Some polls show as many as 10 percent of Americans think Obama, whose father was a Kenyan Muslim, is also Muslim.
NEWS
April 27, 2006 | By John J. DiIulio Jr
President Bush has repeatedly called supporting religious groups that help the poor "the most important domestic initiative of my presidency. " Last year, Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton (D., N.Y.) preached in Boston that nobody "is more likely" to serve the needy than "someone who sees God at work. " Rather than continue to "have a false . . . debate about the role of faith-based institutions," she insisted, we should "provide the support that is needed on an ongoing basis. " Amen, but President Bill Clinton signed the first relevant federal law in 1996, President Bush's faith-based initiative began in 2001, and Washington still has not come close to providing "the support that is needed on an ongoing basis.
NEWS
October 10, 2004 | By Chris Satullo
Today, the Editorial Board I lead takes on a job it takes quite seriously: endorsing a candidate for president of the United States. Our recommendation to you, the voter, is Democrat John F. Kerry. Let me pause to let the waves of shock wash over you . . . Obviously, anyone who has read our editorials over the last four years knows our view: George W. Bush has been a poor president. So, no, the essay on the facing page is not an upset on the order of Villanova over Georgetown in 1985.
NEWS
January 16, 2004 | By William Douglas INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
President Bush placed a wreath at the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s grave yesterday to a chorus of boos from hundreds of mostly African American demonstrators, who felt that Bush's policies run counter to the civil rights leader's beliefs. Bush's visit to the grave site on what would have been King's 75th birthday also bothered some African American lawmakers, who characterized the appearance as a hollow gesture. The President won only 8 percent of the black vote in 2000, and yesterday's appearance suggested it will be difficult for him to do better in 2004.
NEWS
November 6, 2003 | By Jim Remsen INQUIRER FAITH LIFE EDITOR
In a challenge to President Bush's controversial faith-based initiative, researchers reported yesterday that a three-year study found job-training clients had fared better overall with secular programs than religious ones. The Charitable Choice Research Project, the largest of its kind to date, focused on government-funded programs in Indiana, Massachusetts and North Carolina. Its results run contrary to the assertion of many religious groups and their advocates that faith-based programs are more effective than their secular counterparts.
NEWS
December 27, 2002
Price too expensive for 'pay to play' politics In his Dec. 20 column ("Who pays for 'pay-to-play'? Not campaign contributors) Andrew Cassel could have gone much, much further in discussing the indirect costs/consequences of the "pay to play" culture that is so endemic in Philadelphia. What about the impact on our young people when they first realize that it's not hard work, self-responsibility, good ideas and ethical behavior that lead to success but instead success is dependent on who you know, whom you pay off, and how you play the under-the-table game?
NEWS
December 13, 2002 | By DAVE DAVIES daviesd@phillynews.com Daily News wire services contributed to this report
PRESIDENT BUSH chose his speech in Philadelphia yesterday to whack Senate Republican leader Trent Lott for his ill-chosen remarks about Sen. Strom Thurmond's 1948 segregationist presidential campaign. "Any suggestion that the segregated past was acceptable or positive is offensive and it is wrong!" Bush told a racially diverse crowd at the Marriott hotel, generating wildly enthusiasatic aplause. "Recent comments by Senator Lott do not reflect the spirit of our country," Bush added.
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