CollectionsFaith
IN THE NEWS

Faith

NEWS
April 18, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jeanne Faith Coryell, 89, of Philadelphia, a freelance artist, died Friday, March 28, of an infection at Symphony Square, an assisted-living facility in Bala Cynwyd. A well-known figure in the Philadelphia art community, Ms. Coryell was a longtime member of the Philadelphia Sketch Club, the Plastic Club, and Philadelphia/Tri State Artists Equity. She was a frequent participant in juried exhibitions at the Sketch Club, the Philadelphia Art Alliance, and the Rittenhouse Square Fine Art Show.
SPORTS
April 14, 2014 | By Dan Norton, For The Inquirer
STATE COLLEGE, Pa. - James Franklin failed to reach his first attendance quota as Penn State's head football coach, but he came close. He wanted more than 80,000 to attend the Nittany Lions' annual Blue-White intrasquad scrimmage Saturday, and 72,000 fans filled Beaver Stadium. The game counted as Penn State's 15th and final spring practice. Franklin wasn't demoralized - he joked that his personal counter tallied 82,000. Regardless of the total, the coach fired up the Penn State faithful with his active coaching style.
SPORTS
March 28, 2014 | BY JOHN MURROW, Daily News Staff Writer murrowj@phillynews.com
HEADS NODDING, eyes rolling and groans of yet another loss - this has become the norm for 76ers fans patiently awaiting the team's first win since Jan. 29 in Boston. Despite the team approaching the NBA record of 27 consecutive losses, fans have still come out in bunches to the Wells Fargo Center to catch a peek of the project general manager Sam Hinkie took over last offseason. "I am going to be excited to say I was there when the team was rebuilt," Sixers fan Patrick Stewart said Friday at the last home game of the season.
SPORTS
March 27, 2014 | By Zach Berman, Inquirer Staff Writer
ORLANDO - With Michael Vick's tenure in Philadelphia concluded, Eagles owner Jeffrey Lurie could not hide his pride when describing Vick's five years in Philadelphia and the risk the organization took in 2009. "It was a leap of faith," Lurie said Tuesday at the NFL owners meetings. "We hoped that Michael would be the person he professed he really was and wanted to be, and would be that way in the community. He hit all markers at a 100 percent level. " Lurie reflected on the "second chance" the Eagles gave Vick after he served 19 months in prison on a dogfighting conviction and how it paid off though Vick's influence in the locker room.
NEWS
March 17, 2014 | BY MENSAH M. DEAN, Daily News Staff Writer deanm@phillynews.com, 215-568-8278
SAYING THAT the punishment should fit the criminal - not the crime - a Philadelphia judge yesterday affirmed the relatively short prison sentences he gave a faith-healing couple who have been convicted in the deaths of two children. In rejecting a motion from the district attorney to more than double the sentences of Herbert and Catherine Schaible, Common Pleas Judge Benjamin Lerner said they do not fit the mode of those who are usually convicted of abusing or killing children. "These are not uncaring, unloving parents," said Lerner, who last month sentenced the couple to 3 1/2 to 7 years in state prison and 30 months of reporting probation for the third-degree murder of their son Brandon, who was nearly 8 months old. Assistant District Attorney Joanne Pescatore had argued for the sentences to be increased to 8 to 16 years.
NEWS
February 21, 2014 | BY MENSAH M. DEAN, Daily News Staff Writer deanm@phillynews.com, 215-568-8278
SAYING THAT IT was they who killed their son and not God or religious devotion, a judge yesterday sentenced a Rhawnhurst couple to 3 1/2 to 7 years in state prison for praying for their pneumonia-stricken baby instead of following a court order to take him to a doctor. Herbert and Catherine Schaible each apologized for the April death of 7-month-old Brandon and said despite their religious beliefs in prayer over medicine, they would take their surviving children to doctors in the future.
NEWS
January 31, 2014 | By Helen Ubinas, Daily News Columnist
MAUREEN DALY, a SEPTA passenger-services representative, put it best: This is a Philadelphia story, a little tale to help restore our sometimes shaky faith in our fellow Philadelphian. So here it goes: The snow was coming down hard by the time Kit Thomas got to 30th Street Station late on Jan. 2 for his annual visit to Philly from Hawaii. Outside, a friend who was also from the islands, picked him up and asked him to drive. Before they drove off, Thomas got out of the car to wipe the ice from the windshield wipers and then the two friends white-knuckled it to a relative's house in Haverford.
NEWS
January 9, 2014
TWO PROMINENT Italians have recently weighed in on Wall Street excess. One is Martin Scorsese, whose "Wolf of Wall Street" is the debauched bio of a crooked and high-living broker. The movie's a hit with critics, and traders have been howling in approval at Manhattan screenings. These same Wall Streeters have been less receptive to criticism offered by another Italian (by profession, if not birth): Pope Francis. His "Evangeli Gaudium" denounced "the absolute autonomy of the marketplace and financial speculation," and questioned the efficacy of trickle-down economic theories.
BUSINESS
December 28, 2013 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pennsylvania legislators are evidently pleased by the work of the state's Gaming Control Board, judging by the additional responsibilities the lawmakers are giving the gambling regulators. First, the tavern-gambling law approved by Gov. Corbett last month put the gaming board's Bureau of Investigations and Enforcement in charge of background checks on bar owners who apply for a "small games" license. Legislative leaders also introduced a bill last month to consolidate regulation of horse and harness racing under the seven-member gaming board.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|