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Fake Passport

NEWS
December 19, 2011 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
SEOUL, SOUTH KOREA - Kim Jong Il, North Korea's mercurial and enigmatic longtime leader, has died. He was 69. Kim's death on Saturday was announced today by the state television from the North Korean capital, Pyongyang. The communist country's "Dear Leader" - reputed to have had a taste for cigars, cognac and gourmet cuisine - died of heart failure. The news came as North Korea prepared for a hereditary succession. Kim Jong Il inherited power after his father, North Korean founder Kim Il Sung, died in 1994.
NEWS
November 2, 1995 | By Jennifer Inez Ward, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
For years, Marianne G. Walker buried the memories of Nazi Germany and the communist government that she and her 11-year-old son escaped for America. Now, 47 years later, Walker has put her harrowing experience on paper. At 82, Walker has survived war and famine. She has lived under Adolf Hitler and Joseph Stalin and seen her home bombed and next-door neighbors disappear. In 1948, Walker landed on the shores of America, weighing only 85 pounds, and settled in Trenton with her son. She landed a job teaching German at Trenton High School and later gave private lessons.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 1998 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Chow Yun-Fat, Hong Kong's most-wanted export after Jackie Chan, is a dreamboat who also happens to be a mesmerizing actor. Sadly for Yun-Fat's American fans who loved him in John Woo's Hard-Boiled and Wong Jing's God of Gamblers, the sole reason to see The Replacement Killers, his first Hollywood picture, is to see how he commands the screen. His English is excellent, but the dialogue in this underwritten thriller about an assassin who has a crisis of conscience is lame beyond belief, though Yun-Fat retains his grace through it all. Because he is tall and does not easily yield to emotionalism, Yun-Fat often is compared with the young Clint Eastwood.
NEWS
June 21, 2011 | By Larry King, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
After two years of courtroom denials, former suburban paralegal Bonnie Sweeten admitted Tuesday in federal court to a three-year series of frauds that cost law clients, her employer, and a frail former in-law close to $1 million. Sweeten, of Feasterville, whose faked 2009 kidnapping drew national notoriety, pleaded guilty in U.S. District Court to one count of wire fraud and one count of aggravated identity theft. U.S. District Judge William H. Yohn Jr. set Sweeten's sentencing date for Sept.
NEWS
February 3, 2012 | By Anthony R. Wood, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Under a judge's lengthy questioning Friday, Parth Ingle, charged along with his mother in the bludgeoning and stabbing death of his father, repeatedly insisted that he didn't want to dump his lawyer. And after a 90-minute hearing, Delaware County Court Judge Barry C. Dozer ruled that attorney John Kusturiss could stay on the case, rejecting conflict-of-interest arguments from prosecutors. The attorney's son and son-in-law are potential prosecution witnesses. The hearing came the day after a dramatic development in the case - the arrest of Ingle's mother, Bhavnaben Ingle, 52, on charges that she, too, took part in the murder of her husband, Arunkumar Ingle.
NEWS
July 19, 2012 | By Mari A. Schaefer, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Attorneys for the mother and son accused of killing their family patriarch argued in a Delaware County courtroom Wednesday that the evidence used to implicate their clients was obtained illegally. Parth Ingle - son of slain Arunkuman Ingle - was in custody when he gave state police a statement but was not read his rights, defense attorney John Kusturiss said during the pretrial hearing. Any evidence obtained from these interviews should not be used as evidence in an upcoming trial, he said.
NEWS
July 20, 2012 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Attorneys for the mother and son accused of killing their family patriarch argued in a Delaware County courtroom Wednesday that the evidence used to implicate their clients was obtained illegally. Parth Ingle - son of slain Arunkuman Ingle - was in custody when he gave state police a statement but was not read his rights, defense attorney John Kusturiss said during the pretrial hearing. Any evidence obtained from these interviews should not be used as evidence in an upcoming trial, he said.
NEWS
December 24, 1999 | By Jonathan S. Landay, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
A Canadian woman arrested this week as she crossed the border into Vermont has ties to a suspected supplier of arms to Islamic extremists in Algeria, U.S. authorities said yesterday. The U.S. Attorney's Office in Burlington, Vt., made the allegation in asking a federal judge to order Lucia Garofalo of Montreal kept in jail while federal investigators look further into her background. The judge approved Garofalo's continued detention, as well as that of Bouabide Chamchi, the Algerian national who was arrested with her Sunday on charges of trying to enter Vermont on a forged French passport.
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