CollectionsFall Schedule
IN THE NEWS

Fall Schedule

FIND MORE STORIES »
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
August 10, 1988 | Los Angeles Daily News
Despite the just-concluded writers' strike, NBC will hit the ground running after the Olympics with 23 new and returning series starting within a month of the games. NBC will have its first new show on the air before its Olympics coverage begins Sept. 15. "Sneak previews" of "Baby Boom," "Dear John" or "Empty Nest" will run before Sept. 10. Thirteen new and returning series will premiere the week after Olympics coverage ends Oct. 3. The other 10 will join the lineup after NBC's telecasts of the World Series, set for the weeks of Oct. 10 and 17. WEEK OF OCT. 3: "ALF," "The Hogan Family," (Mon.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 1986 | By David Bianculli, Inquirer TV Critic
NBC, the final network to reveal its fall prime-time lineup, announced yesterday that it had scheduled 6 1/2 new hours of programming each week - more than CBS, but a lot less than ABC. Among the eight new entries are Sherman Hemsley as a Philadelphia deacon, Andy Griffith in Matlock (reprising his successful telemovie role from March), Loni Anderson in a comedy reminiscent of Down and Out in Beverly Hills, two new dramatic series from the makers of Hill Street Blues and Miami Vice - and TV's latest alien sitcom.
NEWS
May 13, 1987 | By Lee Winfrey, Inquirer TV Writer
NBC, the most popular network in prime time, will add five series to its schedule in the fall. In the only major time change involving a returning series, it will switch Family Ties from Thursday to Sunday nights. NBC (Channel 3) plans a formal announcement of its schedule today, but according to information that leaked out yesterday, the new series will be: A Different World, a spinoff from television's most popular series, The Cosby Show. The new situation comedy will star one of the Cosby family's daughters, Denise Huxtable (played by Lisa Bonet)
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 2013 | By Ellen Gray
JENKINTOWN'S Adam F. Goldberg ("Breaking In," "Fanboys") is bringing his wonder years to ABC this fall. His autobiographical new sitcom, "The Goldbergs," was one of a dozen new scripted series that ABC presented to advertisers in New York yesterday afternoon, and it's the one that ABC Entertainment Group president Paul Lee singled out more than once in a conference call with reporters. "I really adore this show," Lee said, and he's planning to promote it, along with its fanboy-friendly lead-in, "Marvel's Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.," from Joss Whedon ("Buffy the Vampire Slayer," "The Avengers")
BUSINESS
May 26, 2006 | By Jonathan Storm INQUIRER TV CRITIC
Dealing from unaccustomed weakness, NBC yesterday announced that it had looked at the other new network schedules and was moving to Plan B. The Peacock shifted nine of the 20 series in its initial fall schedule, introduced just last week. Biggest change in the unprecedented shuffle: Law & Order, which has aired at 10 p.m. Wednesdays for 13 years, will now appear Fridays. Networks in the past have made small adjustments to previously publicized schedules, but nothing on the scale announced by NBC. In recent years, the Peacock has dominated broadcast ratings and would reveal its fall plans first at the annual weeklong "up-front" presentations for advertisers.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2011 | By GAIL PENNINGTON, St. Louis Post-Dispatch
IF YOU RAN a TV network, you'd renew your favorite shows and cancel all the stupid ones. Me, too. The problem is, your favorite shows probably aren't my favorite shows, and we could argue "stupid" all night. A network programmer who made decisions this way, from the heart and not the head, would soon be out of a job, and the network would go bust. Network television (we're talking ABC, CBS, NBC, Fox and the CW here) depends on mass audiences to survive, and that means attracting the broadest swath of viewers.
NEWS
October 30, 1986 | By Christine M. Johnson, Special to The Inquirer
After three weeks fraught with frustration and canceled classes, students at Temple University's Ambler campus again filled the classrooms Monday. Students greeted the return to school with a mixture of relief that the semester was not canceled and concern over the fall schedule revisions. "I'm glad that the strike is finally over," said Cathy Sheehan, a 19- year-old sophomore from Lafayette Hill. Standing in a busy Cottage Hall corridor between classes, Sheehan said with relief: "It's time to get back to normal.
SPORTS
December 5, 2001 | By Marc Narducci INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Olympic Conference will downsize from three divisions to two in field hockey and boys' and girls' soccer next fall, and the league's athletic directors met yesterday to finalize plans for next year's fall schedule. All three sports featured three divisions with five teams each this fall. According to Olympic Conference bylaws, there must be at least five teams to form one division. But Highland is expected to move to the Tri-County Conference, and Overbrook has applied to the Colonial.
NEWS
September 30, 1993 | by Richard Huff, New York Daily News
Production began Monday on the revamped Bob Newhart series, "Bob," that returns - with numerous cast and storyline changes - to the CBS schedule at 9:30 p.m. Friday, Oct. 22. Newhart is being joined by new cast members Betty White, Jere Burns ("Dear John"), Eric Allan Kramer ("Down Home") and Megan Cavanagh ("A League of Their Own"). In addition, Carlene Watkins returns as Bob's wife, as well as Cynthia Stevenson as their daughter. A year ago, the series storyline had Newhart playing a comic-book artist.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 2015 | By Howard Gensler
NBC ANNOUNCED its new shows for fall and midseason yesterday. Daily News TV critic Ellen Gray will begin to review them in September after she watches them, but Tattle isn't confined by such process. So here they are: * "Blindspot" is a drama about a woman found naked and covered in tattoos (a/k/a clues) in NYC, with no memory of who she is. We lose interest a few minutes after she puts on her clothes. * "The Player" is a thriller about a former military operative turned security expert in Las Vegas.
NEWS
May 16, 2014 | By Ellen Gray
NEW YORK - CBS is ready for some football. Though still the most-watched network, it's no longer tops among the 18- to 49-year-olds that most advertisers target - unless you don't count sports. Which advertisers might. Enter Thursday-night football, which will launch on CBS Sept. 11 with Pittsburgh-Baltimore, pushing the start of the network's Thursday entertainment lineup to Oct. 30. Fans of "The Big Bang Theory" won't have to wait that long. The hit show will be moved temporarily to 8 p.m. Mondays to lend support to the sophomore sitcom "Mom," at 8:30, before moving back to 8 p.m. Thursdays.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 2013 | By Ellen Gray
JENKINTOWN'S Adam F. Goldberg ("Breaking In," "Fanboys") is bringing his wonder years to ABC this fall. His autobiographical new sitcom, "The Goldbergs," was one of a dozen new scripted series that ABC presented to advertisers in New York yesterday afternoon, and it's the one that ABC Entertainment Group president Paul Lee singled out more than once in a conference call with reporters. "I really adore this show," Lee said, and he's planning to promote it, along with its fanboy-friendly lead-in, "Marvel's Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.," from Joss Whedon ("Buffy the Vampire Slayer," "The Avengers")
NEWS
September 18, 2012 | By Lisa Mascaro, Tribune Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - Congress will meet for only a few final days this week to enable lawmakers to campaign full time in the battle for control of Congress, leaving much business undone until after the election. The House convenes for three days to wrap up its work, while the Senate, where Democrats have the majority, is considering a similar truncated schedule. Lawmakers had initially been scheduled to work through the first week of October. The one must-pass piece of legislation - a bill to keep the government funded once the new fiscal year begins, Oct. 1 - is set for final approval this week in the Senate after having already cleared the House.
NEWS
May 21, 2012 | By David Hiltbrand, INQUIRER TV WRITER
In an annual rite known as Upfront Week, NBC, Fox, ABC, CBS, and the CW just presented their lineups for the 2012-13 TV season to advertisers in New York. The ceremonies took place in some of the city's most august concert Halls (Carnegie, Avery Fisher, Radio City Music) over four days. The broadcast companies introduced only 20 new series for the fall (down from 27 last season). NBC led the pack with six new shows. Fox and the CW had half that many. Like it or not, an awful lot of familiar faces will be returning in the fall.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 2012 | By David Hiltbrand, INQUIRER TV WRITER
Fox announced its fall lineup on Monday with great fanfare and minimal changes. The presentation at the Beacon Theater in New York began with a video of the cast from New Girl interviewing prospective additional roommates — everyone from Fringe's Walter Bishop to the Rubber Man from FX's American Horror Story. Afterward the network executives introduced two new sitcoms and a drama series, a modest harvest by any measure. The Mob Doctor is taking over House's practice on Monday nights.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 2011
SARAH MICHELLE Gellar will be back on TV this fall, on the CW, the network that grew from the two networks that each once featured her as "Buffy the Vampire Slayer. " The 10-hour-a-week network yesterday announced its fall schedule for the 2011-12 TV season, with changes in all five of the nights it programs, and the big news, of course - widely reported in recent days and actually made official Wednesday morning by CBS entertainment president Nina Tassler - was that Gellar's new show had been picked up. And perhaps in deference to "The Vampire Diaries," which is one of the successes of the CW's lineups, she will not be dispatching the undead this time around.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 2011 | By FRAZIER MOORE, Associated Press
NEW YORK - Jack Donaghy, the boss on NBC's comedy "30 Rock," had had enough of TV inefficiencies and waste. "Do you know what the business model is in the entertainment industry? Make 10 shows and hope that one of them works," huffed Donaghy (played by Alec Baldwin) to put-upon producer Liz Lemon (Tina Fey) in a recent episode. "We produce more failed pilots than the French air force!" Many flesh-and-blood executives share similar misgivings about pilot season, which after more than a half-century remains a sacred but extravagant custom of the TV biz. By January of each season, scripts for dozens of pilots for prospective TV series are approved for production by the five broadcast networks.
NEWS
April 24, 2011 | By Jonathan Storm and Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writers
When Comcast put up $13.8 billion to take control of NBCUniversal in January, it got theme parks that are tons of fun, studios that can produce hit movies, cable networks like USA and Bravo that spew money out the bottom line. And a big, heavy ball and chain that weighs the deal down: the worst prime-time lineup on network television, the perennial loser that is NBC. Comcast is intent on turning that weight into a helium balloon. Three weeks from Monday, it will make its first major move, with the presentation to potential advertisers of its fall schedule.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2011 | By GAIL PENNINGTON, St. Louis Post-Dispatch
IF YOU RAN a TV network, you'd renew your favorite shows and cancel all the stupid ones. Me, too. The problem is, your favorite shows probably aren't my favorite shows, and we could argue "stupid" all night. A network programmer who made decisions this way, from the heart and not the head, would soon be out of a job, and the network would go bust. Network television (we're talking ABC, CBS, NBC, Fox and the CW here) depends on mass audiences to survive, and that means attracting the broadest swath of viewers.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|