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Fallingwater

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NEWS
September 28, 2009 | By Peter Mucha INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The welcome mat has become more welcoming at Fallingwater. On Friday, the famed Frank Lloyd Wright-designed house in southwestern Pennsylvania spelled out a new program to let visitors stay two nights on the grounds and have hours of access, including dinner, at "everyone's dream house in the woods," director Lynda Waggoner said. Previously, only students, teachers, and staff could do more than go through on a tour, she said. The initial guest list, though, is not only small, but it also might already be filled.
NEWS
August 31, 1986 | By Thomas Hine, Inquirer Architecture Critic
No trip to Western Pennsylvania would be complete without a visit to the Edgar J. Kaufmann house, better known as Fallingwater. Fallingwater is one of the most famous houses of the 20th century and one of the great dream houses of all time. Perched almost precariously across a waterfall, this weekend house, built for a Pittsburgh department store's owner, embodies the particularly American desire to be at one with the wilderness and be very comfortable at the same time. When Kaufmann hired Frank Lloyd Wright - at the urging of his son, who had served as an apprentice to the great architect - he believed that the house would look out on the rocky outcropping and the waterfall on the site.
NEWS
August 23, 1987 | By Mack Reed, Special to The Inquirer
Fifty years ago, Frank Lloyd Wright finished building his epic Fallingwater - over a serene waterfall in the deep woods along Bear Run - as an ultramodern vacation retreat for the wealthy Pittsburgh department store magnate Edgar J. Kaufmann Sr. Twenty-four years ago, the owner's son, Edgar Jr., donated the house to the Western Pennsylvania Conservancy, which buffed it to a high polish and opened it to tours. Six days a week, six hours a day, for the paltry price of $5, one can walk with learned guides through the cool rooms and stone halls over the falls, and experience Fallingwater for what it is - an engineering marvel and a testament to inventive home-building.
NEWS
September 10, 1995 | By Julia Cass, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Over the years, I'd seen photographs of Fallingwater, the summer home Frank Lloyd Wright designed over a small waterfall on a stream named Bear Run about an hour southeast of Pittsburgh. I knew that architects had given it the highest praise. The American Institute of Architects voted Fallingwater the most important architectural design in America, and many architectural critics consider Wright's design one of the most - if not the most - influential piece of modern architecture in the world.
NEWS
March 31, 1990 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Like so many other aging homes around America, the cottage tucked back in the woods above the cascading waters of Bear Run needs a little work. The roof leaks, the terrace walls are chipping away, some of the woodwork has been damaged by water and sunlight, and a chunk of concrete as big as a terrier has dropped off the second floor. But this is not just another handyman's project. This is America's most successful example of creative design, the favorite building of the nation's architects.
NEWS
October 27, 1991 | By Thomas Hine, Inquirer Architecture Critic
Fallingwater, the Frank Lloyd Wright-designed Western Pennsylvania wilderness retreat astride a waterfall, has been, since its construction in 1936, the great American dream house. Even before it was finished, a drawing of it, along with Wright, appeared on the cover of Time. It revitalized the career of its architect, who had spent most of the 1920s, one of the great building booms of all time, doing only a handful of buildings. Although tourists flock to the house, 40 miles southeast of Pittsburgh and now a museum, Fallingwater is best known as an image of personal luxury in a primeval setting.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 2013 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
Modern architects have a long tradition of trying to reimagine the relationship between buildings and nature. Philip Johnson famously designed the walls of his Glass House so it appears that only the barest membrane separates its occupants from the rolling Connecticut countryside. At Fallingwater, Frank Lloyd Wright envisioned the house's cantilevered terraces growing organically from the boulders over the thundering Bear Run torrent. New York architects Marion Weiss and Michael Manfredi take an entirely different path with their Krishna P. Singh Center for Nanotechnology at the University of Pennsylvania.
NEWS
November 1, 1999 | By Lore Kephart
There's fame and then there's fame. Consider architects. The building that houses the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts is widely respected. But even Philadelphians may need reminding that their city's Frank Furness was the architect. Say "Guggenheim Museum," however, or say "Fallingwater," and Frank Lloyd Wright probably pops quickly into mind. He may be the only architect most people can name. Wright had romantic notions about home. Here was where the family gathered, where the piano was played and lessons learned.
NEWS
April 17, 1994 | By Bridget Mount, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
To many, Frank Lloyd Wright was a brief mention in a history book, or the man behind the architectural wonder of Fallingwater. To Springfield resident Robert Carroll May, he was a mentor and an inspiration. "He had more charisma per square inch than anybody I ever met," May said in a recent interview. "It was partly the rebel in Mr. Wright that appealed to me. " That charisma and rebellious nature changed American architecture - not only through Wright's own work, but through the work of his apprentices such as May, who handled more than $45 million in projects.
TRAVEL
September 4, 2011 | By Kevin Begos, Associated Press
SHANKSVILLE, Pa. - In one sense, Shanksville is a tiny village far from major cities and cultural attractions. But the crash of Flight 93 in a field there on Sept. 11, 2001, has brought visitors from around the world to the national park site that now marks the spot where the hijacked plane came down. And some of these visitors are finding other things to do while they're in the area. They're combining a pilgrimage to the Flight 93 National Memorial with trips to attractions like Frank Lloyd Wright's architectural masterpiece Fallingwater or the Andy Warhol Museum in Pittsburgh, 90 minutes away by car. The Flight 93 National Memorial is just off a tiny country road lined with old wooden farmhouses that could fit in a Norman Rockwell painting.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 2013 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
Modern architects have a long tradition of trying to reimagine the relationship between buildings and nature. Philip Johnson famously designed the walls of his Glass House so it appears that only the barest membrane separates its occupants from the rolling Connecticut countryside. At Fallingwater, Frank Lloyd Wright envisioned the house's cantilevered terraces growing organically from the boulders over the thundering Bear Run torrent. New York architects Marion Weiss and Michael Manfredi take an entirely different path with their Krishna P. Singh Center for Nanotechnology at the University of Pennsylvania.
TRAVEL
September 4, 2011 | By Kevin Begos, Associated Press
SHANKSVILLE, Pa. - In one sense, Shanksville is a tiny village far from major cities and cultural attractions. But the crash of Flight 93 in a field there on Sept. 11, 2001, has brought visitors from around the world to the national park site that now marks the spot where the hijacked plane came down. And some of these visitors are finding other things to do while they're in the area. They're combining a pilgrimage to the Flight 93 National Memorial with trips to attractions like Frank Lloyd Wright's architectural masterpiece Fallingwater or the Andy Warhol Museum in Pittsburgh, 90 minutes away by car. The Flight 93 National Memorial is just off a tiny country road lined with old wooden farmhouses that could fit in a Norman Rockwell painting.
NEWS
September 28, 2009 | By Peter Mucha INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The welcome mat has become more welcoming at Fallingwater. On Friday, the famed Frank Lloyd Wright-designed house in southwestern Pennsylvania spelled out a new program to let visitors stay two nights on the grounds and have hours of access, including dinner, at "everyone's dream house in the woods," director Lynda Waggoner said. Previously, only students, teachers, and staff could do more than go through on a tour, she said. The initial guest list, though, is not only small, but it also might already be filled.
NEWS
July 19, 2009 | By William Ecenbarger FOR THE INQUIRER
Walking down the wood-chipped path lined with rhododendrons and lichened rocks, you can hear it before you can see it. But then, suddenly, there it is, as though moved into place by an unseen hand: the World's Greatest House. Raising her voice above the roar of the water, guide Marsha Forys asks, "Does everyone know what a cantilever is? It's like a diving board, something that extends beyond its support. " In the background are ledges of horizontal rock and the layered, cantilevered trays of reinforced concrete jutting over the waterfall; the interaction of site and building is so complete that the house would seem out of place in any other setting.
NEWS
March 24, 2000 | By Inga Saffron, INQUIRER ARCHITECTURE CRITIC
Frank Lloyd Wright's Fallingwater, the architectural masterpiece built over a thundering Pennsylvania waterfall and one of the state's premier tourist attractions, will receive $3.5 million from Harrisburg to help prevent a sagging terrace from crashing into the cascading waters below, Gov. Ridge announced yesterday in Pittsburgh. The state money will help pay for a comprehensive renovation, estimated to cost $8.1 million, of the historic home. Built in 1936 for a wealthy merchant, the retreat in the Appalachian hills marked Wright's embrace of modernism and is considered one of the best examples of modern domestic architecture anywhere.
NEWS
November 1, 1999 | By Lore Kephart
There's fame and then there's fame. Consider architects. The building that houses the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts is widely respected. But even Philadelphians may need reminding that their city's Frank Furness was the architect. Say "Guggenheim Museum," however, or say "Fallingwater," and Frank Lloyd Wright probably pops quickly into mind. He may be the only architect most people can name. Wright had romantic notions about home. Here was where the family gathered, where the piano was played and lessons learned.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 1999 | By Inga Saffron, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Frank Lloyd Wright's Fallingwater may be one of the greatest works of architecture America has produced, but the 1936 dream house causes the kind of maintenance headaches that try the patience and pocketbooks of homeowners everywhere. The flat roofs leak, not in drips but in torrents, forcing curators to scurry around with plastic covers at the first sign of a drizzle. Plastic sheeting draped over a (waterproofed) Diego Rivera drawing serves as a water slide for the rain. Concrete walls are veined with cracks that leach mysterious white goo. And worst of all, the famous cantilevered terraces are beginning to dip a bit too close to the frothing waters of the Bear Run falls.
NEWS
September 10, 1995 | By Julia Cass, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Over the years, I'd seen photographs of Fallingwater, the summer home Frank Lloyd Wright designed over a small waterfall on a stream named Bear Run about an hour southeast of Pittsburgh. I knew that architects had given it the highest praise. The American Institute of Architects voted Fallingwater the most important architectural design in America, and many architectural critics consider Wright's design one of the most - if not the most - influential piece of modern architecture in the world.
NEWS
April 17, 1994 | By Bridget Mount, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
To many, Frank Lloyd Wright was a brief mention in a history book, or the man behind the architectural wonder of Fallingwater. To Springfield resident Robert Carroll May, he was a mentor and an inspiration. "He had more charisma per square inch than anybody I ever met," May said in a recent interview. "It was partly the rebel in Mr. Wright that appealed to me. " That charisma and rebellious nature changed American architecture - not only through Wright's own work, but through the work of his apprentices such as May, who handled more than $45 million in projects.
NEWS
October 24, 1993 | By Ralph Vigoda, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Younger Daughter was at overnight camp for the first time. Older Daughter was at the age - she had her license, a job and a boyfriend - when the only way she would vacation with her parents was if we glued her to the back seat. In other words, for the first time since pterodactyls flew, we were free, free, free to go away by ourselves. But where? The waters of the Gulf of Mexico? A giddy few days in Paris? The possibilities were endless. So we came here - to Cleveland.
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