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Fallujah

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NEWS
November 18, 2004 | By Dogen Hannah INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
U.S. and Iraqi officials claimed near-victory in their campaign to dislodge insurgents from two key cities yesterday, even as rebel attacks peppered Iraq with violence elsewhere. In Fallujah, about 40 miles west of Baghdad, U.S. and Iraqi forces warily patrolled neighborhoods and continued their treacherous building-to-building search for rebel die-hards, weapons caches and homemade bombs. Intense mortar and artillery barrages and close cover from U.S. aircraft backed up troops on the ground.
NEWS
April 27, 2004 | By Carol Rosenberg and Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
A fragile cease-fire broke down yesterday after gun battles erupted between U.S. Marines and Sunni Muslim insurgents holed up in a mosque, killing one American and eight Iraqi militants. Nine Marines were wounded in the firefight, the fiercest in two weeks. In Baghdad, two U.S. soldiers were killed and five wounded when an explosion leveled part of a single-story building they were in while searching for suspected chemical munitions. To the south, U.S. troops were sent to replace Spanish forces, which are withdrawing from the holy city of Najaf, in a bid to force radical Shiite Muslim cleric Muqtada al-Sadr to surrender and disband his renegade militia.
NEWS
April 29, 2004 | By Carol Rosenberg INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
Marines awaiting orders to launch a full-scale attack here are using a not-so-secret weapon that commanders consider more effective than a 500-pound bomb to winnow down enemy fighters: sniper teams that target anyone suspected of being an insurgent. In the last three weeks, two sniper teams attached to the First Battalion, Fifth Marine Regiment, have shot down 90 people who have strayed into their sights. The two teams are part of the 100 Marine sharpshooters deployed by three battalions around the city.
NEWS
January 10, 2005 | By Tom Lasseter INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
Mustafa Kareem climbed off the bus into a crowd of women in ankle-length black robes who were clutching bottles of water and stacks of blankets. The midday sun beat down, and their faces were weary. They had returned to Fallujah last week wondering whether their houses were still standing and how they might start their lives again. Kareem - 21, clean-shaven and handsome, with carefully slicked-back hair and dirt on his jeans - wondered the same as he proclaimed his humble mission.
NEWS
November 8, 2004 | By Hannah Allam and Tom Lasseter INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
U.S. forces stormed into western Fallujah early today, hours after Iraq's interim government declared a 60-day state of emergency throughout most of the country, apparently in anticipation of the battle for control of the insurgent stronghold. The U.S. forces seized the main city hospital and secured two key bridges over the Euphrates River in what appeared to be the first stage of the long-expected assault on the city, about 35 miles west of Baghdad. Insurgents increased their attacks for a second day, killing at least 22 Iraqi police officers in towns northwest of Fallujah and two American soldiers in west Baghdad.
NEWS
November 10, 2004 | By Tom Lasseter INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
U.S. forces seized a third of Fallujah yesterday after fierce overnight fighting and shelling that turned the Sunni Muslim city into a debris-strewn battlefield. American commanders said they had expected more organized resistance from Islamic extremists holed up in the city, but they quickly added that the battle had not been won. Even without a coordinated counterattack, the thousands of troops pushing into the heart of Fallujah encountered booby-trapped buildings, snipers and roadside bombs on the second day of their offensive.
NEWS
September 26, 2004 | By Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
As five more U.S. troops were reported killed in Iraq, U.S. air strikes in Fallujah early yesterday killed eight people and wounded 15, including women and children, according to Iraqi reports. The strikes targeted followers of Iraq's most-wanted radical leader and other insurgents. There was no word on whether any radicals were killed. In western Iraq, four Marines were killed Friday, and a U.S. soldier died yesterday in a homemade bomb explosion in the capital, the U.S. military said.
NEWS
November 13, 2004 | By Tom Lasseter INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
Jump out. Kick in door. Spray machine-gun fire. Run to rooftop. Kill enemy. Jump back into armored vehicle. Move to new location. Repeat. So goes the battle for Fallujah as experienced yesterday by the exhausted soldiers of the Third Brigade of the Army's First Infantry Division. Flanked by Marines, the bleary troops led the southern push to corner die-hard Sunni Muslim insurgents who were the last obstacles to full American control of the city. With about 80 percent of Fallujah occupied, U.S. forces were confident they had gained the upper hand, according to Marine Lt. Gen. Thomas Sattler, commander of the offensive.
NEWS
October 15, 2004 | By Nancy A. Youssef and Patrick Kerkstra INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
On the eve of the Muslim holy month of Ramadan, Iraq's most feared group claimed responsibility for setting off two bombs in the heavily fortified Green Zone, killing at least five people, including at least three Americans. The twin bombings were the first fatal attacks in the U.S.-controlled Green Zone, a compound of 10,000 U.S. and other coalition nationals and Iraqi employees that had been considered the safest place in Baghdad, if not all of Iraq. A group led by the Jordanian-born Abu Musab al-Zarqawi claimed responsibility for the bombings.
NEWS
April 9, 2004 | By Matthew Schofield INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
U.S. Marines and Iraqi insurgents fought pitched battles for control of Fallujah into the early hours of today, and Spanish troops reportedly battled a Muslim militia group in Najaf as the anticoalition attacks stretched into a sixth day. There were signs that the uprising was slowing; for the first time since Sunday, no new cities reported combat. But Iraqi insurgents remained in control of three southern towns, and the commander of U.S. forces in Iraq said he expected resistance to go on "for some time.
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BUSINESS
November 12, 2013 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Columnist
James M. Davie is president and CEO of a fledgling construction-management and general-contracting company. But the titles don't matter to him on Veterans Day. Being a Marine does. "I'd do it again if they'd let me," the 33-year-old Havertown resident and former corporal with the 15th Marine Expeditionary Unit said of enlisting. Honorably discharged after sustaining serious injuries in an October 2004 insurgent attack in Fallujah, Davie will join other wounded warriors in a parade down Fifth Avenue in New York.
NEWS
October 29, 2013 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA In his gun turret, Marine Cpl. Jason Simms was chatting over a radio with the driver of their light armored vehicle in Fallujah in 2004 when their lives changed forever. "He was from Tennessee and talked about the country life," Simms said of Lance Cpl. Tim Creager. "He told me, 'I'm going take you bull riding' when we get back home. " Wham! A shattering explosion and bright flash from an improvised explosive device stunned Simms, who came to about 30 seconds later to find himself slumped over the vehicle with his hands in flames.
NEWS
July 30, 2012 | By Mazin Yahya, Associated Press
BAGHDAD - Two bombings and a drive-by shooting Sunday killed seven Iraqi police in a former al-Qaeda stronghold in the western part of the country, authorities said, another sign of the militants' resurgence. The attacks before dawn around the city of Fallujah also wounded nine police. They come a week after the leader of al-Qaeda in Iraq announced a campaign to reclaim parts of the country the Sunni insurgency was forced to leave before the U.S. military pulled out in December. After the attacks Sunday, security forces sealed off all roads leading into Fallujah and imposed a curfew on the city, 40 miles west of Baghdad.
NEWS
April 29, 2012 | Ryan Manion Borek is executive director of the Travis Manion Foundation
As I watched my mom suffer from Stage IV lung cancer, it was hard to imagine how she could be so strong. But then I thought about what my younger brother did in Iraq on April 29, 2007, the last day of his life. "He protected his men as he now protects me," Janet Manion, mother of Marine First Lt. Travis Manion, said on April 16 from her hospital bed in Doylestown. With the five-year anniversary of my brother's death approaching, I asked my mom to talk about Travis, who is buried at Arlington National Cemetery.
NEWS
October 12, 2010 | By Brian Crecente, McCLATCHY NEWS SERVICE
A few weeks ago, Electronic Arts found out the hard way that video games' latest four-letter word is actually seven letters long. News that the publisher's forthcoming modern military first-person shooter was going to be set in the ongoing war in Afghanistan, based on real engagements that pitted U.S. soldiers against Taliban fighters, hit without raising much ire. But when word came out less than two months before the game's October release that...
NEWS
August 8, 2010 | By Tom Manion
As we walked up the tarmac at the Baghdad airport, I began to think about the significance of my trip to Iraq and the country's future. It was 3 a.m. May 25, and we had just finished a two-week whirlwind visit to the country where my son Travis gave his life defending freedom. We had met with Iraqi army soldiers who had served side by side with Travis and went to places like Fallujah where he had fought. I'm not sure I got all the answers I was looking for, but it was a healing process that allowed me to better understand his sacrifice.
NEWS
February 1, 2008 | By Kevin Ferris
From a State of the Union that won't be much quoted, a line for the military that can't be repeated enough: "In the past year, you have done everything we've asked of you, and more. Our nation is grateful for your courage. We are proud of your accomplishments. " Take the case of one Marine, Sean A. Stokes of California. On Wednesday, his 25th birthday, he will be awarded the Silver Star for courage demonstrated during the hand-to-hand, street-fighting nightmare that was the Battle of Fallujah in November 2004.
NEWS
June 26, 2007 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
He ducks in and out of dusty cinderblock houses in Fallujah, following heavily armed Marines as the staccato pop, pop, pop of gunfire erupts nearby. He carries 40 pounds of equipment in temperatures that climb past 120 degrees. And he sometimes stays up 30 hours at a time while the Marines work through the night to set up precincts as part of the troop-surge strategy aimed at securing the restive country. Jim Spiri, a Trenton native, has never served in the military. And at 52, he doesn't have to be in Iraq.
NEWS
June 25, 2007 | By Edward Colimore, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
He ducks in and out of dusty cinderblock houses in Fallujah, following heavily armed Marines as the staccato pop, pop, pop of gunfire erupts nearby. He carries 40 pounds of equipment in temperatures that climb past 120 degrees. And he sometimes stays up 30 hours at a time, while the Marines work through night to set up precincts as part of the troop-surge strategy aimed at securing the restive country. Jim Spiri, a Trenton native, has never served in the military. And at 52, he doesn't have to be in Iraq.
NEWS
May 5, 2007 | By Jeff Shields and Mari A. Schaefer INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
The American flag over Doylestown's Veterans Park was already at half-staff yesterday for a Marine killed in Iraq, so there was no need to lower it when the news of a second slain serviceman, Army First Lt. Colby Umbrell, filtered through the stunned community. Umbrell, 26, an airborne Ranger, a former high school and college football standout, and a Johns Hopkins University graduate, died Thursday when an improvised explosive device detonated near his vehicle in Musayyib, a town about 40 miles south of Baghdad.
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