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Fame

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NEWS
February 18, 1986 | By William Ecenbarger
Let's declare a national moratorium for 100 years or so on the creation of halls of fame. In case you haven't noticed, the flame of fame is burning brightly - indeed, blindingly - across the land, and halls of fame are being opened at the rate of one per month. It's a veritable hailstorm of name- dropping. Just last month, the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame held its inaugural ceremony in, of all places, the Grand Ballroom of the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel. After inducting Elvis and Fats and Chuck, everybody joined in singing "Roll Over, Beethoven," and he probably did. But Ludwig will never be asked to join the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, nor the Songwriters Hall of Fame (New York)
NEWS
March 26, 1986
I was insulted by Mark Randall's article on the Rock-and-Roll Hall of Fame ("Is rock-and-roll ready for a hall?" Op-ed Page, March 11). First he calls rock-and-roll trash and bad music, and then he claims that our generation spent the first half of our lives in adolescence. All this from a man who can only think of Fabian? Perhaps Mr. Randall is living the second half of his life under a rock. He was right about the trash situation, and his article helped to make it worse.
NEWS
March 10, 1988 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Special to The Inquirer
The Marple Newtown School District is planning a Hall of Fame to honor distinguished graduates of Marple Newtown High School, said Naomi Zaslow, school district director of information. "Lots of different kinds of people will be included. Whatever milieu they find themselves in, if they are contributing, we'd like to recognize them," Zaslow said. The names of those elected to the Hall of Fame will be engraved on a plaque to be displayed in the high school. Honorees will also be recognized at a special assembly next fall.
NEWS
June 24, 1993 | by Mary Flannery, Daily News Staff Writer
They've got all their marbles in Wildwood. The national Hall of Fame for marbles will be dedicated tonight in Wildwood, the site of annual marbles tournaments for the past 34 years. "There's a list of the national champions, photographs, trophies and tournament shirts," said Robert Scully of the Wildwood Historical Society. "One thing that surprised me was the handmade clay marbles from the late 1800s. Today, they're made of glass and manufactured by the millions. " The Marbles Hall of Fame will occupy a room in the George F. Boyer Museum at Spencer Avenue and Holly Beach station.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 1987 | By David Bianculli, Inquirer TV Critic
Seven years after the premiere of the movie, and four years after NBC's cancellation of the series, Fame continues to make good the promise of its theme song: "I'm gonna live forever. . . . I'm gonna learn how to fly. " Fame (Saturdays at 6 p.m. on Channel 29), now in its sixth season of production for television, is alive and well - very well - and living in syndication. People who haven't seen it since its NBC days have missed a lot. Janet Jackson, for example, was a series regular two years ago, and its latest cast is its strongest yet. Creatively, Fame is now a better program than ever before.
SPORTS
January 8, 2012
Between four and seven enshrinees will be announced Feb. 4, the day before the Super Bowl. Bill Parcells, coach Tim Brown, wide receiver Cris Carter, wide receiver Andre Reed, wide receiver Jerome Bettis, running back Curtis Martin, running back Will Shields, offensive lineman Aeneas Williams, defensive back ...
SPORTS
December 30, 1986 | By Alex Rosen, Special to The Inquirer
Joe Ostroski, one of Philadelphia's most famous bowlers, may soon realize a dream of long standing - a berth in the American Bowling Congress National Hall of Fame. "There's a possibility I could be placed in the veterans' category," said Ostroski, a venerable pin toppler who was prominent in the match-game era. "I've been near induction, but as for now, the votes, especially in the East, are hard to come by. It seems the West and Midwest dominate the hall. " But Ostroski's hopes are rising.
SPORTS
October 21, 1993 | by Ted Taylor, Special to the Daily News
I recently had the opportunity to participate in a hobby-dealer gathering at the new NHL Hockey Hall of Fame in Toronto. I was impressed with the facility, the scope of the collection and the enthusiasm with which this sports mecca is being greeted by visitors. Housed in a refurbished bank building, the Hockey Hall of Fame is located right off the lake front in the banking district of the city. Hall president David Taylor said the decision to locate the facility in the city has paid big dividends since it opened in early June of this year.
SPORTS
May 7, 2014 | By Stan Hochman, Daily News Staff Writer
DICK ALLEN led the entire cockeyed world of baseball in OPS-plus for 10 years, from 1964 to 1973. His number was 165, higher than Henry Aaron, higher than Willie McCovey, higher than Frank Robinson, Harmon Killebrew, Willie Stargell, Roberto Clemente and Willie Mays. Dominate any phase of the game for 10 years, pitching or hitting or slugging, and you oughta be in the Hall of Fame. Allen is not in the Hall of Fame. The other seven guys are. Philadelphia's City Council, which can't always agree that today is Tuesday, unanimously passed a resolution last week urging the committee that's going to nominate overlooked players who played in the Golden Era, from 1946 to '72, to consider Allen.
NEWS
December 7, 1986 | By Jerry W. Byrd, Inquirer Staff Writer
It happened this way: Don Lee Van Winkle, Don Ferris and Mickey Brook were rehearsing "under the grate" at J & R Parking on Sansom Street in Center City. This was in the late 1960s, when their band, the Great American Dream, spent eight to 12 hours a day honing its musical talents down there. Guitarist and songwriter Van Winkle was toying with a country melody one day when band members Nick Jameson and Nicky Indelicato came into the underground studio with lyrics they'd worked out as they rode into town.
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NEWS
October 12, 2014 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ray K. Metzker, 83, widely considered one of the nation's greatest photographers, died Thursday, Oct. 9, after a long illness. A spare and somewhat laconic figure, Mr. Metzker came to Philadelphia in 1962 to teach at the Philadelphia College of Art - now part of the University of the Arts - and fell in love with the shadow-streaked streets of the old city. Known for his black-and-white images of the urban streetscape - a man walking past the Fidelity Bank building, a woman captured by a shaft of sunlight, a sailor in whites stepping into an ominous shadow - Mr. Metzker walked the city decade after decade, finding the remarkable in the ordinary and the powerful in the most fleeting.
SPORTS
October 10, 2014 | BY MIKE KERN, Daily News Staff Writer kernm@phillynews.com
RAHEEM BROCK (Dobbins Tech) and Dan Klecko were teammates on the defensive line at Temple for a couple of seasons at the turn of the century, and then again with an Indianapolis Colts team in 2006 that won the Super Bowl. So now maybe it's only right that they're part of the six-person class being inducted into the university's Athletics Hall of Fame, a group that also includes the late football coach Ray Morrison (1940-48). They'll be introduced - along with field hockey's Michelle Murawski (1997-2000)
SPORTS
October 8, 2014 | By John Smallwood, Daily News Staff Writer
AFTER 2 DECADES of covering sports in Philadelphia, I've concluded that there are reasons why the footage in the opening credits for the hit show "It's Always Sunny in Philadelphia" are entirely night images of the city. Show creator Rob McElhenney is a native Philadelphian born in 1977. He was 3 when the Phillies won the 1980 World Series and 6 when the Sixers won the NBA title in 1983. Then it was zip until the Phillies won again in 2008, when McElhenny was 31. For Philadelphia sports fans of his generation, the sun rarely shined.
SPORTS
September 26, 2014 | By Mike Jensen, Inquirer Columnist
If there is a small regret in Glenn Fine's sporting life, it's this: Fine didn't show up in Texas for rookie camp in 1979 after the San Antonio Spurs drafted him in the 10th round, the 199th player taken of 202 overall. Fine had other plans. He had been awarded a Rhodes Scholarship out of Harvard and knew that he was done with hoops - and that if he had gone to that Spurs camp, he would have been cut, probably quickly. These days, the draft is two rounds, and second-rounders don't necessarily make it. A 10-round draft?
SPORTS
September 25, 2014 | BY TOM MAHON, Daily News Staff Writer mahont@phillynews.com
ADD ANOTHER milestone to the still-fledgling career of Mo'ne Davis. The 13-year-old Taney pitcher, who last month appeared on the cover of Sports Illustrated, is headed to the Baseball Hall of Fame where she will donate the jersey she wore while becoming the first female to pitch a complete-game shutout in a Little League World Series game. Tomorrow, she will be in Cooperstown, N.Y., along with teammates from Taney and the Anderson Monarchs, the travel team that she has played for since she was 7. Davis will present her No. 3 jersey - the one she wore during a 4-0 victory over Nashville - to Hall of Fame president, Jeff Idelson.
NEWS
September 25, 2014 | By Sofiya Ballin, Inquirer Staff Writer
On Tuesday morning, between Walnut and Spruce Streets, the stars were aligned. The Philadelphia Music Alliance, Avenue of the Arts Inc., and International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees (IATSE) Local 8 teamed up for Making the Stars Shine, an unofficial start to the 2014-15 cultural season in Philadelphia. Volunteers from all three organizations and the Kimmel Center cleaned and shined all 121 plaques on the Walk of Fame down South Broad Street. Each plaque took up to an hour and a half to clean.
SPORTS
September 18, 2014 | For The Inquirer
Phoenixville's Joe Thomson, owner of Standardbred breeding operation Winbak Farm, has been elected to the Harness Racing Hall of Fame, the U.S. Harness Writers Association (USHWA) announced Tuesday. Thomson and his wife JoAnn started Winbak Farm in 1991. The operation has ranked No. 2 among all breeders in purses earned each of the last 12 years, totaling more than $205 million since the start of 2002, and produced three Horse of the Year Award winners. In addition, Bob Marks, the longtime marketing guru of Perretti Farms and a noted writer and handicapper, and Kathy Parker, the editor and general manager of the Horseman and Fair World publishing company, were elected to the Communicators Hall of Fame.
SPORTS
September 11, 2014 | BY RYAN LAWRENCE, Daily News Staff Writer rlawrence@phillynews.com
The broadcasting duo of Harry Kalas and Richie Ashburn is arguably the most popular in Philadelphia sports history. Now you can help the late Ashburn, a Hall of Fame player with the Phillies, receive the most prestigious broadcasting award in baseball. Ashburn is among the 42 candidates eligible to receive the Ford C. Frick Award from the National Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, N.Y. Beginning this week through Sept. 30, fans can help Ashburn's case by voting on the museum's Facebook page ( www.facebook.com/baseballhall )
NEWS
September 11, 2014 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
LAWYERS MIGHT HAVE one of the most joked-about jobs on Earth, but here in Philadelphia, they now are among the most celebrated: Temple University yesterday officially opened a national Trial Lawyer Hall of Fame. The hall was founded in 2009 by the Trial Lawyer magazine, but hasn't had a physical home until now. Its goal: to honor trial lawyers "who have left an indelible mark on the American legal tradition through a lifetime of service to the American public, the Constitution and the American trial bar," according to its website.
NEWS
September 6, 2014 | By Michael Boren, Inquirer Staff Writer
The hand-carved carousel in Seaside Heights, a longtime boardwalk staple that was set to be sold in an auction, is back from the dead. Borough officials introduced an ordinance Wednesday that would allow Seaside Heights to acquire the 104-year-old ride, coined the Dr. Floyd L. Moreland Historic Dentzel/Looff Carousel. The owners of Casino Pier - who were planning to sell it - would receive oceanfront property in exchange, according to the ordinance. The man whose name the carousel bears said Thursday he was "ecstatic" about the plan.
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