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Family Business

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NEWS
January 5, 1987
City Controller Joseph Vignola is asking the city Board of Ethics whether City Council members are being underhanded when they hire relatives as paid personal staff at frequently fat salaries. They're not being dishonest, but they are playing fast and loose with their own reputations. The real question ought to be why it took so long for someone to ask. There's something oily about elected Council members putting the bite on the city for additional paychecks for husbands, wives, sons, daughters and maybe even the family cocker spaniel.
NEWS
February 2, 2016 | Inquirer Editorial Board
The charges that former city elections official Renee Tartaglione engaged in an especially low form of corruption - stealing government funds entrusted to a nonprofit clinic for the poor and mentally ill - suggest a familiar pattern. The Tartagliones once ran the city elections office like a family business, using the public agency to serve their personal and political agendas. Former City Commissioners Chairwoman Marge Tartaglione hired daughter Renee as her chief deputy. When Renee's husband, Carlos Matos, got out of prison, he was put on the Democratic Party payroll.
NEWS
March 8, 2005 | By Elizabeth Zimmer FOR THE INQUIRER
Providence, R.I.'s only world-class dance company will touch down at the Painted Bride this weekend, making its Philadelphia debut with a 2004 show called Home Movies. For almost two decades, Everett Dance Theatre, named for Rhode Island-born tap dancer Everett Weeden, has been producing unique pieces on such subjects as flight, headline news, science, labor, education, and racial diversity and equality. Born out of Dorothy Jungels' relationship to her children's school, the troupe consistently comes up with shapely dance-theater projects that have charmed audiences of all ages.
NEWS
November 28, 1993 | By Sonia R. Lelii, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The stark white store stands in front of a peach orchard in a generally isolated area, except for the heavily traveled stretch of Route 322. Inside Damask's Candies, sweet smells surround employees laboring over tedious jobs as the 77-year-old owner oversees the process. Constantine Damask is the only one of 11 siblings to take on the nearly 80- year-old family business started by his immigrant father. Damask built this store in 1955 after his father, Arthur, died at 73. But it was the man with the Old World philosophy who made the family name synonymous with chocolate.
NEWS
May 3, 2000 | By Rusty Pray, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Austin Pomerantz, 86, the last surviving family owner of an office-supply business with deep roots in Philadelphia, died Thursday of heart failure at Bryn Mawr Hospital. Mr. Pomerantz had been a resident of the Quadrangle, a retirement community in Haverford, for more than 10 years. A native of Philadelphia, he also had resided in Elkins Park and Society Hill, both for many years. Mr. Pomerantz was the middle of three brothers who owned and operated A. Pomerantz & Co., an office-supply, printing and furniture business founded by their father, Amen, in 1888 as a variety store.
NEWS
March 21, 1990 | By Kathleen Martin Beans, Special to The Inquirer
A Navy pilot. A successful business executive. A farm market and orchard manager. Those are very different careers, but Ray Markloff, the new manager of Styer's Orchards in Langhorne, has done all three. Markloff is running Styer's Orchards with the help of two of his children, Bill, 29, and Mary, 24. The Styer family still owns the orchard, but all management decisions for the orchard and the store attached to it are made by Markloff. Eventually, he may buy it from the Styers, but there have been no sales negotiations yet, Markloff said.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 15, 1989 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
The genetic improbability of the strapping Sean Connery portraying father to runty Dustin Hoffman, who in turn plays father to average-sized Matthew Broderick, isn't an issue in Sidney Lumet's cockamamie tragicomedy Family Business, a felonious Crimes and Misdemeanors. Three generations of McMullens - patriarch Jessie (Connery), son Vito (Hoffman) and grandson Adam (Broderick) - share flinty eyes and a larcenous bent. Where they differ is in their various ethnicities (Jessie is 100-percent Scot, Vito half-Sicilian, Adam half-Jewish)
NEWS
October 26, 1995 | By S. Joseph Hagenmayer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Jami Schneider, 24, a Cherry Hill resident studying to be a massage therapist and planning on starting a business with her mother and sister, was killed Sunday in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., where she had been vacationing and visiting friends. Police said she had been shot to death. Born in Philadelphia and raised in Cherry Hill, Ms. Schneider was a 1989 graduate of Cherry Hill High School East, where she was a member of the Distributive Education Clubs of America program and Students Against Drunk Driving.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 7, 2016 | By Matt Catrillo, LEBANON DAILY NEWS
LEBANON, Pa. - Not too many businesses, no matter the type or area they serve, can say they've lasted for a century. And shoe repair shops have been seen as a "dying breed" for years. But one Lebanon business has overcome those obstacles and will celebrate a milestone Wednesday. DiNunzio's Shoe Repairs is celebrating 100 years of serving Lebanon and its surrounding area, and is now a four-generation family business. "I think being a four-generation business helps. But because it's down to us after there used to be eight shops in Lebanon, what's happened is the shoe industry's changed in different qualities, but we've changed with it," said owner Dave DiNunzio.
NEWS
August 8, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
Ira M. Saligman, 53, of Wayne, an aviator, philanthropist, and real estate investor, died Sunday, July 31, of injuries he had sustained six days earlier when his vintage aircraft caught fire as it landed in West Mifflin, Pa. Mr. Saligman got out of the airplane at Allegheny County Airport, but died in the Mercy burn unit at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. The cause of the fire in the World War II-era plane, as it pulled to a stop on the tarmac, was unknown. Mr. Saligman was en route to an air show in Oshkosh, Wis., where he intended to meet his pilot friends.
BUSINESS
August 8, 2016 | By Suzette Parmley, Staff Writer
Little Roxborough - 40,000 in population and 5.5 square miles in size - took a victory lap last month. The announcement July 7 that it was selected for one of four "flexible format" Target stores within the city limits blew up social media - 300 shares on Facebook and about 50,000 views of the online post, said James Calamia, executive director of the Roxborough Development Corp. (RDC). "It's incredible so many folks have moved into this area," he said. "They have their own set of needs and wants, and it's not exactly the right products and services to match those needs.
NEWS
July 22, 2016 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, POLITICS WRITER
CLEVELAND - Donald Trump's adult children have taken to the convention stage this week to try to shape a softer image of the Republican nominee for president. Last month, they pressed their father to dump his top adviser and reset his political operation for the general election. And as Trump was finalizing his choice of Indiana Gov. Mike Pence as his running mate, he flew the kids to Indianapolis for meetings. To a degree unheard of in the modern political era, the Trump campaign for president has become a family business.
BUSINESS
June 26, 2016 | By Diane Mastrull, Staff Writer
Mary Livingston didn't need to utter a word. As an African American woman, her presence said it all. But she said what she came to say anyway. "We have really transitioned from the look of old, retired white guys," she told her audience one evening in May. Twenty women were participating in a retirement- planning course offered by the Women's Opportunities Resource Center. Livingston was there to explain how her business- mentoring organization, SCORE Philadelphia, was changing - starting with her appointment as its first female leader.
FOOD
June 10, 2016 | By Samantha Melamed, Staff Writer
A decade ago, Ben Wenk had a new diploma from Pennsylvania State University in agroecology and a decision to make: whether to strike out on his own or return to Adams County and join the family business, Three Springs Fruit Farm. Then, he saw an announcement about a new farmers' market in Society Hill. His family hadn't sold at farmers' markets. "It clicked: That's what I wanted to do. It was the chance to be a vendor here at Headhouse Farmers' Market that convinced me to come back to the farm," he said on a Sunday afternoon in May, manning his stand in the brick-paved arcade at Second and Pine Streets.
NEWS
June 3, 2016 | By Laura McCrystal, Staff Writer
He had taken away a family business from her, and was living with another woman. That is why, prosecutors said, Hsiu-Chin "Linda" Lin murdered her ex-husband. But her attorney argued that she shot and killed her ex-husband last week in the garage of their North Wales, Montgomery County, home because she "snapped" under the strain of emotional and physical abuse she had suffered at his hands. At a preliminary hearing Wednesday a judge ordered Lin held for trial on first-degree murder and other charges.
NEWS
May 8, 2016
The Excellent Lombards By Jane Hamilton Grand Central 288 pp. $26 Reviewed by Connie Ogle The Wisconsin apple orchard that belongs to the Lombard family in Jane Hamilton's hypnotic new novel is a beacon for the nostalgic and the hopeful, those who nurse their memories carefully and tend to them the way the Lombards care for their trees, their sheep, even their poor, doomed lambs. Narrator Mary Frances "Frankie" Lombard describes the appeal: "There were plenty of people who felt, the minute they started down our long driveway, that they were returning to a bygone time.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2016
Adapted from a recent online discussion. Question: I have been married for almost six years to a great guy and have three small children. My widowed mother-in-law, "Nancy," recently had a stroke and needs daily care, so she moved in with us. I love her and am glad to be there for her, but, even though I'm a stay-at-home mom and we have hired a part-time aide, it is a lot. My husband and his younger brother work long hours in the family business, plus there is a limited amount Nancy is comfortable having her sons do for her. I asked my sister-in-law, "Lena," whom I have a great relationship with, to pitch in with Mom's care.
NEWS
March 10, 2016 | By Valerie Russ, Staff Writer
AMONG THE CLATTER of beer bottles and old acquaintances chatting, the crowd at Dirty Franks raised their drinks "to Joe!" after every speaker shared a personal memory of Joseph Tiberino on Tuesday. Tiberino, 77, a stylish, well-known artist, died Feb. 19 after a yearlong illness, said one of his sons, Raphael. "He was always there for me, in good times or bad," said Joe Brenman, a sculptor, who spoke at the Center City bar at 13th and Pine Streets. "To Joe!" the crowd shouted.
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