CollectionsFamily Business
IN THE NEWS

Family Business

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
January 5, 1987
City Controller Joseph Vignola is asking the city Board of Ethics whether City Council members are being underhanded when they hire relatives as paid personal staff at frequently fat salaries. They're not being dishonest, but they are playing fast and loose with their own reputations. The real question ought to be why it took so long for someone to ask. There's something oily about elected Council members putting the bite on the city for additional paychecks for husbands, wives, sons, daughters and maybe even the family cocker spaniel.
NEWS
February 2, 2016 | Inquirer Editorial Board
The charges that former city elections official Renee Tartaglione engaged in an especially low form of corruption - stealing government funds entrusted to a nonprofit clinic for the poor and mentally ill - suggest a familiar pattern. The Tartagliones once ran the city elections office like a family business, using the public agency to serve their personal and political agendas. Former City Commissioners Chairwoman Marge Tartaglione hired daughter Renee as her chief deputy. When Renee's husband, Carlos Matos, got out of prison, he was put on the Democratic Party payroll.
NEWS
March 8, 2005 | By Elizabeth Zimmer FOR THE INQUIRER
Providence, R.I.'s only world-class dance company will touch down at the Painted Bride this weekend, making its Philadelphia debut with a 2004 show called Home Movies. For almost two decades, Everett Dance Theatre, named for Rhode Island-born tap dancer Everett Weeden, has been producing unique pieces on such subjects as flight, headline news, science, labor, education, and racial diversity and equality. Born out of Dorothy Jungels' relationship to her children's school, the troupe consistently comes up with shapely dance-theater projects that have charmed audiences of all ages.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 2010 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
'Is there something wrong with you?" the young wife asks her young husband when the subject of children is brought up, and he has said no kids, "not ever. " And in All Good Things , there does appear to be something amiss with David Marx (Ryan Gosling). Son of a New York real estate magnate, David mumbles to himself, seems lost in his own world. He can be oddly charming, and when he first meets Katie (Kirsten Dunst), a Long Island girl just moved to the big city, they are clearly taken with each other.
NEWS
November 28, 1993 | By Sonia R. Lelii, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The stark white store stands in front of a peach orchard in a generally isolated area, except for the heavily traveled stretch of Route 322. Inside Damask's Candies, sweet smells surround employees laboring over tedious jobs as the 77-year-old owner oversees the process. Constantine Damask is the only one of 11 siblings to take on the nearly 80- year-old family business started by his immigrant father. Damask built this store in 1955 after his father, Arthur, died at 73. But it was the man with the Old World philosophy who made the family name synonymous with chocolate.
NEWS
May 3, 2000 | By Rusty Pray, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Austin Pomerantz, 86, the last surviving family owner of an office-supply business with deep roots in Philadelphia, died Thursday of heart failure at Bryn Mawr Hospital. Mr. Pomerantz had been a resident of the Quadrangle, a retirement community in Haverford, for more than 10 years. A native of Philadelphia, he also had resided in Elkins Park and Society Hill, both for many years. Mr. Pomerantz was the middle of three brothers who owned and operated A. Pomerantz & Co., an office-supply, printing and furniture business founded by their father, Amen, in 1888 as a variety store.
NEWS
March 21, 1990 | By Kathleen Martin Beans, Special to The Inquirer
A Navy pilot. A successful business executive. A farm market and orchard manager. Those are very different careers, but Ray Markloff, the new manager of Styer's Orchards in Langhorne, has done all three. Markloff is running Styer's Orchards with the help of two of his children, Bill, 29, and Mary, 24. The Styer family still owns the orchard, but all management decisions for the orchard and the store attached to it are made by Markloff. Eventually, he may buy it from the Styers, but there have been no sales negotiations yet, Markloff said.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 15, 1989 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
The genetic improbability of the strapping Sean Connery portraying father to runty Dustin Hoffman, who in turn plays father to average-sized Matthew Broderick, isn't an issue in Sidney Lumet's cockamamie tragicomedy Family Business, a felonious Crimes and Misdemeanors. Three generations of McMullens - patriarch Jessie (Connery), son Vito (Hoffman) and grandson Adam (Broderick) - share flinty eyes and a larcenous bent. Where they differ is in their various ethnicities (Jessie is 100-percent Scot, Vito half-Sicilian, Adam half-Jewish)
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 8, 2016
The Excellent Lombards By Jane Hamilton Grand Central 288 pp. $26 Reviewed by Connie Ogle The Wisconsin apple orchard that belongs to the Lombard family in Jane Hamilton's hypnotic new novel is a beacon for the nostalgic and the hopeful, those who nurse their memories carefully and tend to them the way the Lombards care for their trees, their sheep, even their poor, doomed lambs. Narrator Mary Frances "Frankie" Lombard describes the appeal: "There were plenty of people who felt, the minute they started down our long driveway, that they were returning to a bygone time.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2016
Adapted from a recent online discussion. Question: I have been married for almost six years to a great guy and have three small children. My widowed mother-in-law, "Nancy," recently had a stroke and needs daily care, so she moved in with us. I love her and am glad to be there for her, but, even though I'm a stay-at-home mom and we have hired a part-time aide, it is a lot. My husband and his younger brother work long hours in the family business, plus there is a limited amount Nancy is comfortable having her sons do for her. I asked my sister-in-law, "Lena," whom I have a great relationship with, to pitch in with Mom's care.
NEWS
March 10, 2016 | By Valerie Russ, Staff Writer
AMONG THE CLATTER of beer bottles and old acquaintances chatting, the crowd at Dirty Franks raised their drinks "to Joe!" after every speaker shared a personal memory of Joseph Tiberino on Tuesday. Tiberino, 77, a stylish, well-known artist, died Feb. 19 after a yearlong illness, said one of his sons, Raphael. "He was always there for me, in good times or bad," said Joe Brenman, a sculptor, who spoke at the Center City bar at 13th and Pine Streets. "To Joe!" the crowd shouted.
BUSINESS
February 4, 2016 | By Diane Mastrull, Staff Writer
There's a threat to local family businesses looming out there, and it's called succession-planning procrastination, according to a new study. A survey of 100 privately held businesses in the Philadelphia region, including South Jersey and northern Delaware, found that 62 percent of senior-generation owners plan to retire or move out of their leadership positions in the next 10 years, while 65 percent of respondents said they did not have clear retirement...
NEWS
February 2, 2016 | Inquirer Editorial Board
The charges that former city elections official Renee Tartaglione engaged in an especially low form of corruption - stealing government funds entrusted to a nonprofit clinic for the poor and mentally ill - suggest a familiar pattern. The Tartagliones once ran the city elections office like a family business, using the public agency to serve their personal and political agendas. Former City Commissioners Chairwoman Marge Tartaglione hired daughter Renee as her chief deputy. When Renee's husband, Carlos Matos, got out of prison, he was put on the Democratic Party payroll.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 20, 2015 | By Jim Rutter, For The Inquirer
American playwrights not only have mastered the family drama, they've also beaten it to death. Whether moaning about glass animals, Osage County in August, or a salesman who died, each instance seems hell-bent on proving Tolstoy's axiom that "happy families are all alike, while every unhappy family is unhappy in its own way. " Most of these attempts can make for a meaty, if maudlin, evening of theater, and while Laura Schellhardt's Auctioning the...
BUSINESS
October 17, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Saying that he's better equipped to create and build a business than scale it up, Vertex Inc. chief executive Jeff Westphal told his 900 employees Thursday that he would step aside as CEO in favor of the tax software company's executive vice president, David DeStefano. The change will occur in phases, starting Jan. 1, when DeStefano, 52, becomes president and Westphal, 53, takes over as chairman of the Berwyn company founded in 1978 by his father. The following January, DeStefano will become chief executive.
NEWS
September 18, 2015 | Drew Lazor, Daily News Staff Writer
WHEN IT comes to staple condiments, some like it hot - and in the United States, the sum of that "some" is growing at a tongue-singeing pace. American hot-sauce sales now top $600 million annually, with the potential to crack $1 billion in the next four years, according to figures cited by Reuters earlier this year. Take it as a sign that our tastes and eating habits, as a nation, are de-wussifying at a fiery clip. (Happy, Ed Rendell?) And they're going global, too. Don't tell Donald Trump, who apparently eats his steaks well-done, but this chili-laden uptick might have something to do with America's burgeoning immigrant populations.
NEWS
August 27, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
John J. Gardner, 75, of Tabernacle, owner of Tuckerton Turf Farms since he opened it in 1977, died Sunday, Aug. 23, at Virtua Memorial Hospital in Mount Holly after a fall. The business has grown Kentucky bluegrass and turf-type tall fescue near the Pinelands, its website states, and sold the grass to Rider, Rowan, and St. Joseph's Universities, and Cherokee and Gloucester City High Schools. The farms trace their origins to the late 1800s, when the first John Gardner, at one time an Atlantic City mayor, began growing crops there.
NEWS
August 7, 2015 | BY JOE BRANDT, Daily News Staff Writer brandtj@phillynews.com, 215-854-4890
A PHILADELPHIA MAN was charged with murder yesterday after allegedly plunging a sword into his father's abdomen, police said. Eli Goodrich, 26, visited his parents' home on Trappe Lane in Langhorne - where the family runs an antiques business - every Tuesday to spend the night with them, police said. But when he arrived about 3:30 p.m. Tuesday, he argued with his father, according to a criminal complaint that detailed parts of their conversation. "You're not going to control my mind anymore," Goodrich told his father and employer, Alan Goodrich, 67. "I have to kill you. " Eli left after that and took the dog for a walk, police said.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|