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Family Business

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NEWS
January 5, 1987
City Controller Joseph Vignola is asking the city Board of Ethics whether City Council members are being underhanded when they hire relatives as paid personal staff at frequently fat salaries. They're not being dishonest, but they are playing fast and loose with their own reputations. The real question ought to be why it took so long for someone to ask. There's something oily about elected Council members putting the bite on the city for additional paychecks for husbands, wives, sons, daughters and maybe even the family cocker spaniel.
NEWS
March 8, 2005 | By Elizabeth Zimmer FOR THE INQUIRER
Providence, R.I.'s only world-class dance company will touch down at the Painted Bride this weekend, making its Philadelphia debut with a 2004 show called Home Movies. For almost two decades, Everett Dance Theatre, named for Rhode Island-born tap dancer Everett Weeden, has been producing unique pieces on such subjects as flight, headline news, science, labor, education, and racial diversity and equality. Born out of Dorothy Jungels' relationship to her children's school, the troupe consistently comes up with shapely dance-theater projects that have charmed audiences of all ages.
NEWS
November 28, 1993 | By Sonia R. Lelii, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The stark white store stands in front of a peach orchard in a generally isolated area, except for the heavily traveled stretch of Route 322. Inside Damask's Candies, sweet smells surround employees laboring over tedious jobs as the 77-year-old owner oversees the process. Constantine Damask is the only one of 11 siblings to take on the nearly 80- year-old family business started by his immigrant father. Damask built this store in 1955 after his father, Arthur, died at 73. But it was the man with the Old World philosophy who made the family name synonymous with chocolate.
NEWS
May 3, 2000 | By Rusty Pray, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Austin Pomerantz, 86, the last surviving family owner of an office-supply business with deep roots in Philadelphia, died Thursday of heart failure at Bryn Mawr Hospital. Mr. Pomerantz had been a resident of the Quadrangle, a retirement community in Haverford, for more than 10 years. A native of Philadelphia, he also had resided in Elkins Park and Society Hill, both for many years. Mr. Pomerantz was the middle of three brothers who owned and operated A. Pomerantz & Co., an office-supply, printing and furniture business founded by their father, Amen, in 1888 as a variety store.
NEWS
March 21, 1990 | By Kathleen Martin Beans, Special to The Inquirer
A Navy pilot. A successful business executive. A farm market and orchard manager. Those are very different careers, but Ray Markloff, the new manager of Styer's Orchards in Langhorne, has done all three. Markloff is running Styer's Orchards with the help of two of his children, Bill, 29, and Mary, 24. The Styer family still owns the orchard, but all management decisions for the orchard and the store attached to it are made by Markloff. Eventually, he may buy it from the Styers, but there have been no sales negotiations yet, Markloff said.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 15, 1989 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
The genetic improbability of the strapping Sean Connery portraying father to runty Dustin Hoffman, who in turn plays father to average-sized Matthew Broderick, isn't an issue in Sidney Lumet's cockamamie tragicomedy Family Business, a felonious Crimes and Misdemeanors. Three generations of McMullens - patriarch Jessie (Connery), son Vito (Hoffman) and grandson Adam (Broderick) - share flinty eyes and a larcenous bent. Where they differ is in their various ethnicities (Jessie is 100-percent Scot, Vito half-Sicilian, Adam half-Jewish)
NEWS
October 26, 1995 | By S. Joseph Hagenmayer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Jami Schneider, 24, a Cherry Hill resident studying to be a massage therapist and planning on starting a business with her mother and sister, was killed Sunday in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., where she had been vacationing and visiting friends. Police said she had been shot to death. Born in Philadelphia and raised in Cherry Hill, Ms. Schneider was a 1989 graduate of Cherry Hill High School East, where she was a member of the Distributive Education Clubs of America program and Students Against Drunk Driving.
BUSINESS
May 5, 2003 | By Reid Kanaley INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Wood sisters, Cynthia and Wanda, were raised in the death business, and they love it. "We realize that it's a little bit unusual," Cynthia Wood said. The two have operated the Wood Funeral Home in West Philadelphia since taking over the family business in 1991. One of them is even married to a funeral director. "People say: 'It's a shame you don't have any brothers.' And we just smile and say: 'We're doing quite well, thank you,' " Cynthia Wood said. Her parents, Clarence and Geraldine Wood, opened the home in 1959.
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NEWS
August 7, 2015 | BY VALERIE RUSS, Daily News Staff Writer russv@phillynews.com, 215-854-5987
THE BLOCK of Seybert Street, where generations of Juan Padilla's family called home for 50 years, can be hard to find in the Sharswood section of North Philly. Seybert is unmarked where it meets North College Avenue, behind the looming stone walls of Girard College. The narrow street winds north, almost snakelike, beneath the gaze of a mural of Henry Ossawa Tanner's "The Banjo Lesson. " Then, Seybert bends west toward 21st Street. On Padilla's side of the block, the sidewalks are crumbling but the houses appear well cared for and colorful.
NEWS
August 7, 2015 | BY JOE BRANDT, Daily News Staff Writer brandtj@phillynews.com, 215-854-4890
A PHILADELPHIA MAN was charged with murder yesterday after allegedly plunging a sword into his father's abdomen, police said. Eli Goodrich, 26, visited his parents' home on Trappe Lane in Langhorne - where the family runs an antiques business - every Tuesday to spend the night with them, police said. But when he arrived about 3:30 p.m. Tuesday, he argued with his father, according to a criminal complaint that detailed parts of their conversation. "You're not going to control my mind anymore," Goodrich told his father and employer, Alan Goodrich, 67. "I have to kill you. " Eli left after that and took the dog for a walk, police said.
SPORTS
May 22, 2015 | BY ED BARKOWITZ, Daily News Staff Writer barkowe@phillynews.com
SOUL DEFENSIVE lineman Uriah Grant was 11 years old when his dad walked into the virtual lion's den. It was 2000 and they were in Detroit. His father, Uriah Grant Sr., was about to fight Thomas "Hit Man" Hearns, one of the great multiweight champions of the latter part of the 20th century. Though both boxers were in the twilights of their careers, Hearns was still a legend in the Motor City. "I remember the fans booing my dad," said Grant, recalling the bout in which Hearns was forced to retire in the third round with an ankle injury.
BUSINESS
May 11, 2015 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
One in a continuing series spotlighting real estate markets in the region's communities. It isn't as well known as Haddonfield or as hip as Collingswood, but these days Haddon Township is much more than a pass-through from one borough to the other. This Camden County community has a life of its own - from the businesspeople, retirees, and friends who start the day with breakfast at the Westmont Diner at Haddon and Maple Avenues to the long line for sticky buns Sunday mornings at the venerable McMillan's Bakery at Haddon Avenue and Cuthbert Boulevard.
NEWS
April 13, 2015 | By Bob Fernandez and Matt Gelb, Inquirer Staff Writers
John S. Middleton, the billionaire part-owner of the Phillies, is battling in court with a younger sister over a 2003 deal in which he bought her and others out of the family's conglomerate for about $200 million and then sold part of the firm four years later for $2.9 billion, according to documents filed in Montgomery County Orphan's Court last week. The sister, Anna K. Nupson, has yet to make specific claims of wrongdoing in court. But she said in a court document last month that she may bring "substantive claims that pertain to possible self-dealing" by her brother.
NEWS
April 11, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
When he was a child, George H. Phillips worked in the kitchen of his family's restaurant in Sea Isle City, N.J. "He opened clams, got a penny apiece," his wife, Linda, said. When ownership of the business - Busch's Seafood Restaurant - passed to him from his mother, Anna Busch, he was back where he started. "He was the cook; he kept the back of the house going," his wife said. Though the restaurant employed as many as 120 workers at its peak, she said, "he sweated like everybody else in that kitchen.
BUSINESS
March 10, 2015 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Columnist
At Lower Merion's border with Narberth, where Montgomery and Haverford Avenues intersect and drivers for years could fill their gas tanks at an Exxon station, a family business helping to fill another need is doing so with a novel look and approach. GreenDrop L.L.C.'s business is collecting used clothing and household goods, but you won't find hulking metal bins anywhere in its ever-expanding footprint. Most of its 20 collection points - now in seven states along the East Coast and the District of Columbia - are in former gas stations, sites tailored for easy entry and exit in high-traffic areas.
BUSINESS
February 24, 2015 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Columnist
Take SEPTA's No. 34 trolley along Baltimore Avenue to 47th Street, and it will deposit you at the doorstep of Lee's Deli, home to such unusual creations as the Game Over Cheesesteak (chicken topped with shrimp and broccoli or spinach) and Tanzanian Fries (an East Africa-inspired omelet stuffed with fried potatoes, cheese, green peppers, and onions, and topped with hot sauce). You also will witness a 22-year-old business in transition, changing in response to a West Philadelphia neighborhood itself taking on a new look as young professionals and families move in. And if you introduce yourself to owner Insuk "Scott" Lee, behind the counter six days a week since he opened the corner eatery in 1993, you will experience a South Korean immigrant's abundant gratitude and joy in fulfilling his American entrepreneurial dream.
BUSINESS
December 18, 2014 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bonnie Haas spent the bulk of her professional life in hospitals tending to some of the sickest patients as an intensive-care nurse. But it has been a lifesaving act of a far more personal nature that has preoccupied her for the last two years. The 57-year-old Bucks County mother of four has revived the family business. That it has come at tremendous professional and personal sacrifice, and tested her emotional fortitude, was as clear as Haas' tears during a recent interview at Kettle Creek Corp.'s workshop and warehouse in Warminster.
NEWS
October 27, 2014 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
If Uncle Jim and Anthony Giambri are looking down now, they're smiling. Their Giambri's Quality Sweets in Clementon was just named a New Jersey Family Business of the Year, an award now in its 22d year that is sponsored by the Rothman Institute of Entrepreneurship at Fairleigh Dickinson University, PNC Bank, and New Jersey Monthly. "It's quite an honor," said Dave Giambri, 51, Anthony's son and company president. He was nominated by his son David, 22, a recent Drexel University graduate and the fourth generation in the family business.
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