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Family Business

ENTERTAINMENT
December 15, 1989 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
The genetic improbability of the strapping Sean Connery portraying father to runty Dustin Hoffman, who in turn plays father to average-sized Matthew Broderick, isn't an issue in Sidney Lumet's cockamamie tragicomedy Family Business, a felonious Crimes and Misdemeanors. Three generations of McMullens - patriarch Jessie (Connery), son Vito (Hoffman) and grandson Adam (Broderick) - share flinty eyes and a larcenous bent. Where they differ is in their various ethnicities (Jessie is 100-percent Scot, Vito half-Sicilian, Adam half-Jewish)
NEWS
October 26, 1995 | By S. Joseph Hagenmayer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Jami Schneider, 24, a Cherry Hill resident studying to be a massage therapist and planning on starting a business with her mother and sister, was killed Sunday in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., where she had been vacationing and visiting friends. Police said she had been shot to death. Born in Philadelphia and raised in Cherry Hill, Ms. Schneider was a 1989 graduate of Cherry Hill High School East, where she was a member of the Distributive Education Clubs of America program and Students Against Drunk Driving.
NEWS
January 11, 2014 | By Barbara Boyer, Inquirer Staff Writer
PITMAN It's time to make the doughnuts. The landmark Pitman Bakery is scheduled to reopen in the spring after closing more than a year ago, leaving a void along South Broadway storefronts. Retired Deptford Police Chief Dan Murphy, 47, and his wife, Veronica, 48, a registered nurse, are starting a new career and family business. They say they will carry forward some of the traditions of the former bakery while they merge it with their vision for a modern shop. "We're going to do our best to live up to the old standards and hope to see the same success," said Dan Murphy, who will oversee maintenance and finances, while his wife will be in charge of baking.
BUSINESS
May 5, 2003 | By Reid Kanaley INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Wood sisters, Cynthia and Wanda, were raised in the death business, and they love it. "We realize that it's a little bit unusual," Cynthia Wood said. The two have operated the Wood Funeral Home in West Philadelphia since taking over the family business in 1991. One of them is even married to a funeral director. "People say: 'It's a shame you don't have any brothers.' And we just smile and say: 'We're doing quite well, thank you,' " Cynthia Wood said. Her parents, Clarence and Geraldine Wood, opened the home in 1959.
BUSINESS
June 15, 1992 | By Alan J. Heavens, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Cappo the Clown was trying to sell Bunny Shore on this great idea for a routine. "We have this cannon," he said, "but we don't shoot anyone out of it. What we do is put one boy in the cannon and another boy where the first boy would land if we were shooting him out of the cannon, and fire a pistol into the air and have the other boy with his clothes all torn as if he were shot out of the cannon . . . " Shore was skeptical. "Work on it," she said. Just a normal day in the lives of Bunny and her husband, Sid, whose family business, Shore Picnics Inc. in Langhorne, has been organizing company outings, group picnics and family reunions for four decades.
NEWS
June 3, 1994 | By Mary Blakinger, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Behind the wheel of a 1922 Buick touring car, Alice Maris Baird was among the first women in Delaware County to drive. She also was a supporter of women's suffrage. But what family members most remember is her business acumen. In 1929, Baird began selling real estate in Swarthmore to support her family as the country tottered on the brink of the Great Depression. Business survival called for ingenuity. "I remember one house she sold, the lady gave her a string of pearls for a commission," recalled her son, Robert S. Bird.
NEWS
September 27, 1993 | By James Cordrey, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
On a cool September morning that signals the beginning of autumn, Earl MacIlwain 3d is standing on a stepladder in the driveway of a large suburban home calling out prices for the furniture strewn across the front yard. "Do I hear $100? . . . I got $100. Do I hear $125? . . . I got $125. Do I hear $150?" he asks, cajoling the crowd with the melodic rise and fall of his voice. MacIlwain, 50, owner of Mac Real Estate & Earl MacIlwain Auctioneers in King of Prussia, is a third-generation auctioneer, heir to a business his grandfather - the original Earl MacIlwain - started nearly a century ago. He calls out in a rapid-fire yet singsong voice, the trademark of auctioneers throughout time, to draw in the crowd of about 200. On this day, he was selling the furnishings of a six-bedroom house, whose owners were preparing to move to a smaller ranch house in another part of town.
NEWS
February 25, 1998 | By Richard Sine, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
As a child, Janet Hackman loved going to auctions with her father. She remembers getting dresses, a refrigerator, even her first car from an auction. "In my blood, I love auctions. . . . My dad would point to somebody and say, 'See that guy who looks like a bum? He's a millionaire four times over. See that guy in the fancy suit? He doesn't have a dime.' " Yesterday, Hackman stared across the rainy parking lot to the warehouse, where a chattering auctioneer was selling off her family's building-supply business.
NEWS
December 10, 1997 | By Malcolm Garcia, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
When Angelo Butera describes the Graterford Hotel as a family business, he means it. He was born and raised in the two-story hotel. Last year, when he was 39 and had been married for 10 years, Butera, wife Lisa, and their two children moved into their own home - a mere 250 yards away from the hotel. "I'm working hours like crazy," Butera said of his 50-hour schedule at the hotel, which he now runs. "But I like it. I'm my own boss. " The hotel was built in 1876 on what is now Route 29, across the street from the state prison.
NEWS
December 9, 2013 | By Barbara Boyer, Inquirer Staff Writer
When he last golfed in November, James C. Henry Jr. scored 85, two strokes below his age. Twice after he turned 80, Mr. Henry, heir to E.P. Henry Corp., hit holes-in-one. As father, husband, son - and golfer - Mr. Henry set an example, said his son James C. Henry III. "He was just that kind of guy that nothing really held him down," the son said. Mr. Henry, 87, who had lived most of his life in South Jersey before moving to Naples, Fla., died on Monday, Nov. 25, just days after being diagnosed with aggressive lung and liver cancer.
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