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Family Business

BUSINESS
March 10, 2015 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Columnist
At Lower Merion's border with Narberth, where Montgomery and Haverford Avenues intersect and drivers for years could fill their gas tanks at an Exxon station, a family business helping to fill another need is doing so with a novel look and approach. GreenDrop L.L.C.'s business is collecting used clothing and household goods, but you won't find hulking metal bins anywhere in its ever-expanding footprint. Most of its 20 collection points - now in seven states along the East Coast and the District of Columbia - are in former gas stations, sites tailored for easy entry and exit in high-traffic areas.
NEWS
January 4, 1996 | By Sharon Tubbs, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Louis J. Eni, 74, of Medford, president and chief operating officer of Dietz & Watson Meats in Philadelphia, died yesterday at Hahnemann University Hospital. Mr. Eni joined Dietz & Watson more than 40 years ago and ran the company for the last 20 years. He is credited with aiding the company's growth into a multimillion-dollar business with customers worldwide and more than 400 employees, said his daughter Cynthia E. Yingling of Medford. According to Mr. Eni's three children, Dietz & Watson is "truly a family business in every sense of the word.
NEWS
September 25, 2013 | By Julie Zauzmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lachlan Pitcairn's life revolved around family. Born into a prominent Pennsylvania clan, he devoted his career to the family business and his leisure time to hosting gatherings full of music for his many relatives. He was a proud patriarch, with 21 grandchildren and 18 great-grandchildren, when he died Wednesday, Sept. 11, at age 91. Six days later, that tally grew when a 19th great-grandchild was born. Mr. Pitcairn died in his home in Bryn Athyn. The cause was pneumonia, his son Scot said.
NEWS
August 18, 1986 | By Dwight Ott, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Dankses are worried. Having fled riots in Camden for the safety of Cherry Hill in the 1970s, they now fear they may have to flee a new kind of upheaval. Charles Danks, 48, pointed to the problem Saturday as he stood along Route 70 near the flow of traffic into the Race Track Circle. Before him in the concrete were two red paint marks that he said spell doom for his family business - marks that show where the State of New Jersey plans to chop 29 feet out of his Sunoco station property to widen the highway that is a main thoroughfare through the township of 70,000.
NEWS
July 4, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Joseph J. McGoldrick, 89, a Jenkintown funeral director for many years, died Saturday, June 29, of heart failure at his residence. He was owner-operator of the Joseph J. McGoldrick Funeral Home, founded by his father, also Joseph J., in 1900. The home was always on or near West Avenue. Born and raised in Jenkintown, he graduated from Immaculate Conception School in 1938 and North Catholic High School in 1942. Tall, tough, lanky, and lefthanded, he was an outstanding pitcher on his high school varsity baseball team.
NEWS
February 21, 1990 | By Melissa Dribben and John Ellis, Special to The Inquirer Inquirer correspondent S.E. Siebert contributed to this article
Whitpain Detective William Pistilli said the case was closed. Police do not know what drove Nicholas Malantonio to such desperation that he set off Monday afternoon with a .357 revolver to kill his father, the mother of his children and then himself. After questioning the young man's family for hours, Pistilli said, they may never know. "We know the end result - that's it," he said. The Montgomery County Coroner's Office completed autopsies yesterday on Malantonio, a 25-year-old unemployed man from Blue Bell; Faye Keohane, the 25- year-old mother of his two children, and Matthew Malantonio, 69, his father.
BUSINESS
September 16, 2014 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Columnist
Dennis Berry said to his three kids a few years ago: "Which one of you wants this?" By "this," the longtime West Chester resident meant a home-based business that was more like a hobby - one that his children and friends had regularly razzed him about. In his spare time for more than 10 years, the chemical-industry career man had been selling monocles. Yes, monocles. Eyewear that fell out of fashion in the 1930s, only to be revived by the likes of Colonel Klink in Hogan's Heroes and an advertising mascot, Mr. Peanut.
NEWS
July 22, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Joan H. Hummel, 83, of Philadelphia and Palm Beach, Fla., a businesswoman, died Sunday, July 20, of pneumonia at Temple University Hospital. Mrs. Hummel was married for 57 years to Dennis Hummel. Together, they built the family business, Metropolitan Reporting Bureau, which supplies information to the insurance industry from offices in Center City. Mrs. Hummel grew up in Yeadon and graduated from Yeadon High School. She earned a bachelor's degree in English at Temple University, where she was a cheerleader and president of Alpha Sigma Pi. She and her husband met in the business world of Philadelphia.
BUSINESS
December 23, 2008 | By Diane Mastrull INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In a roomful of mostly builders, developers and planners, Frank J. McKee Jr. stood out - not just because of the silver stud earring he wore, but because of his tender age. At 24, he was by far among the youngest - if not the youngest - of the couple of hundred attending the breakfast meeting of the Delaware Valley Smart Growth Alliance. He is also the least senior at his family's development and building company, the McKee Group, but not by much. His sisters, Kate Black, 30, and Jenni McKee, 32, also work there.
NEWS
August 30, 2011 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
William L. Rosenberger, 84, a retired president of Rosenberger's Dairies, which was founded by his father and grandfather on the family farm in 1925, died of complications from a stroke Thursday at the Dock Woods Community in Lansdale. In his 64 years with the family business, Mr. Rosenberger was known for doing whatever it took to make sure milk arrived on porch doorsteps or on supermarket shelves. Mr. Rosenberger delivered milk door-to-door in glass bottles and hauled large cans of it on company trucks.
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