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BUSINESS
October 14, 2013 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Staff Writer
With the family business thriving nearly 75 years after its debut in South Philadelphia, the planned opening of a fifth Di Bruno Bros. store next Monday in the city's Washington Square West neighborhood might strike some as a "So what?" moment. It's anything but, say city economic-development professionals and business owners in the downtown pocket where Di Bruno's is bringing its high-end Italian foods market. "They have amazing brand recognition," said Ivy Olesh, vice president of marketing and business development at the quasi-public Philadelphia Industrial Development Corp.
BUSINESS
June 21, 2006 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
All they could do was stand together, cling to one another, and quietly cry, watching as a December fire destroyed a family business that had stood on the Wildwood boardwalk for nearly 50 years. Five months later, together, they joyously - but without much ceremony because a crowd was practically breaking down the doors to get in - reopened Sam's Pizza Palace at the same 26th Street location in time for Memorial Day weekend. "We never could have gotten through it all without each other," said Rosemary Zuccarello, 53, whose father, Sam Spera, started it all in 1957 with a small steak sandwich shop a few blocks away, eventually moving, adding pizza, and taking over the Shore Plaza Motel.
NEWS
December 9, 2001 | By Joseph S. Kennedy INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Adolph G. Rosengarten Jr. is best remembered as a Main Line gentleman who helped create Chanticleer, an arboretum on his family estate in Wayne. Yet Rosengarten also was a decorated soldier who was involved in one of the most significant espionage developments of World War II. "I had intended to be known as a good landscape gardener, not a spy," Rosengarten wrote in 1974 after his involvement in the Allies' intelligence work became public knowledge. In early 1941, Rosengarten, then 35, went on active military duty and ended up with a coastal artillery unit, which was disbanded in 1943.
NEWS
January 15, 2006 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
A hundred years after the Continental Army occupied the hills around Fort Washington in Montgomery County, several prominent Philadelphia families came together to encamp there for a longer stay. They were the Fells and the Drexels, new scions of the Gilded Age. In 1882, they brought their fabulous fortunes to Camp Hill, built several stone mansions along the sprawling ridge, and lay the foundation of a colorful, 70-year tenancy. Theirs is a story marked by privilege and intrigue and perhaps even murder, said Lew and Trudy Keen, who will present a multimedia program on Camp Hill Hall at 8 p.m. Tuesday at Clifton House in Fort Washington.
BUSINESS
March 4, 2012 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Staff Writer
To know Dale Petrovitch is to know his generosity, his employees say. And that goes beyond competitive wages, health benefits, and 401(k) matches. Their boss has been known to spring for their kids' wedding and prom limousines, provide for special needs of their ailing family members, and fund local school programs. So when Petrovitch decided to essentially hand the family business over to his workforce of 30 at the close of 2011, it didn't necessarily surprise his employees as much as it terrified some of them because of the enhanced responsibility it put on them for the company's survival.
NEWS
October 12, 2010 | By John Shiffman, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was one of the nation's largest affirmative-action frauds - $119 million spent on 336 bridge projects, from eastern Pennsylvania interstates to SEPTA's Market-Frankford Line. The conspiracy unfolded over 15 years, unchecked by regulators, as a white-family-run concrete business in Schuylkill County used a Filipino man's minority status to win contract after contract. The sham company, operated from a Connecticut basement, became Pennsylvania's greatest recipient of the U.S. government's disadvantaged-business program.
NEWS
January 4, 1996 | By Sharon Tubbs, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Louis J. Eni, 74, of Medford, president and chief operating officer of Dietz & Watson Meats in Philadelphia, died yesterday at Hahnemann University Hospital. Mr. Eni joined Dietz & Watson more than 40 years ago and ran the company for the last 20 years. He is credited with aiding the company's growth into a multimillion-dollar business with customers worldwide and more than 400 employees, said his daughter Cynthia E. Yingling of Medford. According to Mr. Eni's three children, Dietz & Watson is "truly a family business in every sense of the word.
NEWS
December 20, 2013 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
Marianne Cozzolino, co-owner of Jenny & Frank's Artisan Gelato, recently found herself short three dozen eggs - just as eggnog gelato season was getting into full swing. Fortunately, she shares her production space with a half-dozen bakers, one of whom had eggs to spare. That kind of neighborly assist is an everyday occurrence at Artisan Exchange, a year-old artisanal food hub hidden within a nondescript industrial park in West Chester. This bland backdrop is the unlikely testing ground for an innovative new model for incubating gourmet food producers: Offer them affordable, flexible work spaces; provide a wholesale distribution network to get their products to market; and add retail opportunities to stimulate early cash flow.
NEWS
October 26, 2011 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jack M. Demetris, 91, of St. Davids, owner of Demetris Uptown Market in Bridgeport, died of heart failure Friday, Oct. 21, at Genesis Healthcare's Wayne Center. Mr. Demetris emigrated from Greece with his mother and father as an infant. In 1932, his parents opened a food market in Bridgeport. The store had two aisles and everything - sugar, flour, rice - was in barrels, said his son, Dennis. During World War II, Mr. Demetris served in the Army in the Pacific. Among his duties was accompanying celebrities entertaining the troops, including the Andrews Sisters and comedian Joe E. Brown.
NEWS
August 18, 1986 | By Dwight Ott, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Dankses are worried. Having fled riots in Camden for the safety of Cherry Hill in the 1970s, they now fear they may have to flee a new kind of upheaval. Charles Danks, 48, pointed to the problem Saturday as he stood along Route 70 near the flow of traffic into the Race Track Circle. Before him in the concrete were two red paint marks that he said spell doom for his family business - marks that show where the State of New Jersey plans to chop 29 feet out of his Sunoco station property to widen the highway that is a main thoroughfare through the township of 70,000.
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