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Family Business

NEWS
April 5, 2014 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tom Wolf, the front-runner among Democrats hoping to challenge Gov. Corbett, has built his campaign on a simple and compelling business success story, which he posted on the "About Tom" tab at the front of his website, and reinforced in his speeches and ads ever since he announced his campaign to supporters last year: He is a successful businessman, rich enough to put at least $10 million of his own money into his campaign - even after saving his...
NEWS
September 21, 1994 | By Daniel Rubin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The cavernous shell that was reduced to rubble in North Philadelphia Monday night bore little resemblance to the bustling mill that for a century turned out fine curtains, carpets and tablecloths, and stitched together a hard- working neighborhood. For most of its life, the eight-building fortress at Fourth and Lehigh was called Quaker Lace Co., a Philadelphia institution started by Joseph H. Bromley in 1894. In its heyday, 100 looms ran at once, with English, French and Irish artisans producing delicate doilies and 40-foot-wide expanses of fabric.
NEWS
September 25, 2013 | By Julie Zauzmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lachlan Pitcairn's life revolved around family. Born into a prominent Pennsylvania clan, he devoted his career to the family business and his leisure time to hosting gatherings full of music for his many relatives. He was a proud patriarch, with 21 grandchildren and 18 great-grandchildren, when he died Wednesday, Sept. 11, at age 91. Six days later, that tally grew when a 19th great-grandchild was born. Mr. Pitcairn died in his home in Bryn Athyn. The cause was pneumonia, his son Scot said.
BUSINESS
June 21, 2006 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
All they could do was stand together, cling to one another, and quietly cry, watching as a December fire destroyed a family business that had stood on the Wildwood boardwalk for nearly 50 years. Five months later, together, they joyously - but without much ceremony because a crowd was practically breaking down the doors to get in - reopened Sam's Pizza Palace at the same 26th Street location in time for Memorial Day weekend. "We never could have gotten through it all without each other," said Rosemary Zuccarello, 53, whose father, Sam Spera, started it all in 1957 with a small steak sandwich shop a few blocks away, eventually moving, adding pizza, and taking over the Shore Plaza Motel.
NEWS
December 9, 2001 | By Joseph S. Kennedy INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Adolph G. Rosengarten Jr. is best remembered as a Main Line gentleman who helped create Chanticleer, an arboretum on his family estate in Wayne. Yet Rosengarten also was a decorated soldier who was involved in one of the most significant espionage developments of World War II. "I had intended to be known as a good landscape gardener, not a spy," Rosengarten wrote in 1974 after his involvement in the Allies' intelligence work became public knowledge. In early 1941, Rosengarten, then 35, went on active military duty and ended up with a coastal artillery unit, which was disbanded in 1943.
NEWS
January 15, 2006 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
A hundred years after the Continental Army occupied the hills around Fort Washington in Montgomery County, several prominent Philadelphia families came together to encamp there for a longer stay. They were the Fells and the Drexels, new scions of the Gilded Age. In 1882, they brought their fabulous fortunes to Camp Hill, built several stone mansions along the sprawling ridge, and lay the foundation of a colorful, 70-year tenancy. Theirs is a story marked by privilege and intrigue and perhaps even murder, said Lew and Trudy Keen, who will present a multimedia program on Camp Hill Hall at 8 p.m. Tuesday at Clifton House in Fort Washington.
NEWS
March 10, 2016 | By Valerie Russ, Staff Writer
AMONG THE CLATTER of beer bottles and old acquaintances chatting, the crowd at Dirty Franks raised their drinks "to Joe!" after every speaker shared a personal memory of Joseph Tiberino on Tuesday. Tiberino, 77, a stylish, well-known artist, died Feb. 19 after a yearlong illness, said one of his sons, Raphael. "He was always there for me, in good times or bad," said Joe Brenman, a sculptor, who spoke at the Center City bar at 13th and Pine Streets. "To Joe!" the crowd shouted.
NEWS
September 18, 2015 | Drew Lazor, Daily News Staff Writer
WHEN IT comes to staple condiments, some like it hot - and in the United States, the sum of that "some" is growing at a tongue-singeing pace. American hot-sauce sales now top $600 million annually, with the potential to crack $1 billion in the next four years, according to figures cited by Reuters earlier this year. Take it as a sign that our tastes and eating habits, as a nation, are de-wussifying at a fiery clip. (Happy, Ed Rendell?) And they're going global, too. Don't tell Donald Trump, who apparently eats his steaks well-done, but this chili-laden uptick might have something to do with America's burgeoning immigrant populations.
NEWS
July 22, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Joan H. Hummel, 83, of Philadelphia and Palm Beach, Fla., a businesswoman, died Sunday, July 20, of pneumonia at Temple University Hospital. Mrs. Hummel was married for 57 years to Dennis Hummel. Together, they built the family business, Metropolitan Reporting Bureau, which supplies information to the insurance industry from offices in Center City. Mrs. Hummel grew up in Yeadon and graduated from Yeadon High School. She earned a bachelor's degree in English at Temple University, where she was a cheerleader and president of Alpha Sigma Pi. She and her husband met in the business world of Philadelphia.
BUSINESS
October 3, 2010 | By Maria Panaritis, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's a playful version of I Dare You : Name any neighborhood or town around Philadelphia, and 86-year-old Charles Kahn Jr. will show you how, over a century, his family has left its mark there. Center City: "Peco at 23d and Market. The base of that building is a three-story garage. It was built by my grandfather. " (It's just cement and concrete, he humbly adds: "Not fancy stuff. ") Roxborough: "Sixty-five hundred block of Ridge. " (It was once a Texaco, back when the Kahns were in the business of building gas stations, when gas stations were The Next Big Thing.
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