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Family Business

NEWS
June 3, 2016 | By Laura McCrystal, Staff Writer
He had taken away a family business from her, and was living with another woman. That is why, prosecutors said, Hsiu-Chin "Linda" Lin murdered her ex-husband. But her attorney argued that she shot and killed her ex-husband last week in the garage of their North Wales, Montgomery County, home because she "snapped" under the strain of emotional and physical abuse she had suffered at his hands. At a preliminary hearing Wednesday a judge ordered Lin held for trial on first-degree murder and other charges.
NEWS
October 27, 2014 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
If Uncle Jim and Anthony Giambri are looking down now, they're smiling. Their Giambri's Quality Sweets in Clementon was just named a New Jersey Family Business of the Year, an award now in its 22d year that is sponsored by the Rothman Institute of Entrepreneurship at Fairleigh Dickinson University, PNC Bank, and New Jersey Monthly. "It's quite an honor," said Dave Giambri, 51, Anthony's son and company president. He was nominated by his son David, 22, a recent Drexel University graduate and the fourth generation in the family business.
BUSINESS
June 21, 2006 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
All they could do was stand together, cling to one another, and quietly cry, watching as a December fire destroyed a family business that had stood on the Wildwood boardwalk for nearly 50 years. Five months later, together, they joyously - but without much ceremony because a crowd was practically breaking down the doors to get in - reopened Sam's Pizza Palace at the same 26th Street location in time for Memorial Day weekend. "We never could have gotten through it all without each other," said Rosemary Zuccarello, 53, whose father, Sam Spera, started it all in 1957 with a small steak sandwich shop a few blocks away, eventually moving, adding pizza, and taking over the Shore Plaza Motel.
NEWS
December 9, 2001 | By Joseph S. Kennedy INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Adolph G. Rosengarten Jr. is best remembered as a Main Line gentleman who helped create Chanticleer, an arboretum on his family estate in Wayne. Yet Rosengarten also was a decorated soldier who was involved in one of the most significant espionage developments of World War II. "I had intended to be known as a good landscape gardener, not a spy," Rosengarten wrote in 1974 after his involvement in the Allies' intelligence work became public knowledge. In early 1941, Rosengarten, then 35, went on active military duty and ended up with a coastal artillery unit, which was disbanded in 1943.
NEWS
January 15, 2006 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
A hundred years after the Continental Army occupied the hills around Fort Washington in Montgomery County, several prominent Philadelphia families came together to encamp there for a longer stay. They were the Fells and the Drexels, new scions of the Gilded Age. In 1882, they brought their fabulous fortunes to Camp Hill, built several stone mansions along the sprawling ridge, and lay the foundation of a colorful, 70-year tenancy. Theirs is a story marked by privilege and intrigue and perhaps even murder, said Lew and Trudy Keen, who will present a multimedia program on Camp Hill Hall at 8 p.m. Tuesday at Clifton House in Fort Washington.
NEWS
September 7, 2016 | By Matt Catrillo, LEBANON DAILY NEWS
LEBANON, Pa. - Not too many businesses, no matter the type or area they serve, can say they've lasted for a century. And shoe repair shops have been seen as a "dying breed" for years. But one Lebanon business has overcome those obstacles and will celebrate a milestone Wednesday. DiNunzio's Shoe Repairs is celebrating 100 years of serving Lebanon and its surrounding area, and is now a four-generation family business. "I think being a four-generation business helps. But because it's down to us after there used to be eight shops in Lebanon, what's happened is the shoe industry's changed in different qualities, but we've changed with it," said owner Dave DiNunzio.
FOOD
June 10, 2016 | By Samantha Melamed, Staff Writer
A decade ago, Ben Wenk had a new diploma from Pennsylvania State University in agroecology and a decision to make: whether to strike out on his own or return to Adams County and join the family business, Three Springs Fruit Farm. Then, he saw an announcement about a new farmers' market in Society Hill. His family hadn't sold at farmers' markets. "It clicked: That's what I wanted to do. It was the chance to be a vendor here at Headhouse Farmers' Market that convinced me to come back to the farm," he said on a Sunday afternoon in May, manning his stand in the brick-paved arcade at Second and Pine Streets.
NEWS
January 4, 1996 | By Sharon Tubbs, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Louis J. Eni, 74, of Medford, president and chief operating officer of Dietz & Watson Meats in Philadelphia, died yesterday at Hahnemann University Hospital. Mr. Eni joined Dietz & Watson more than 40 years ago and ran the company for the last 20 years. He is credited with aiding the company's growth into a multimillion-dollar business with customers worldwide and more than 400 employees, said his daughter Cynthia E. Yingling of Medford. According to Mr. Eni's three children, Dietz & Watson is "truly a family business in every sense of the word.
NEWS
September 25, 2013 | By Julie Zauzmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lachlan Pitcairn's life revolved around family. Born into a prominent Pennsylvania clan, he devoted his career to the family business and his leisure time to hosting gatherings full of music for his many relatives. He was a proud patriarch, with 21 grandchildren and 18 great-grandchildren, when he died Wednesday, Sept. 11, at age 91. Six days later, that tally grew when a 19th great-grandchild was born. Mr. Pitcairn died in his home in Bryn Athyn. The cause was pneumonia, his son Scot said.
NEWS
August 18, 1986 | By Dwight Ott, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Dankses are worried. Having fled riots in Camden for the safety of Cherry Hill in the 1970s, they now fear they may have to flee a new kind of upheaval. Charles Danks, 48, pointed to the problem Saturday as he stood along Route 70 near the flow of traffic into the Race Track Circle. Before him in the concrete were two red paint marks that he said spell doom for his family business - marks that show where the State of New Jersey plans to chop 29 feet out of his Sunoco station property to widen the highway that is a main thoroughfare through the township of 70,000.
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