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Family Business

BUSINESS
June 21, 2006 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
All they could do was stand together, cling to one another, and quietly cry, watching as a December fire destroyed a family business that had stood on the Wildwood boardwalk for nearly 50 years. Five months later, together, they joyously - but without much ceremony because a crowd was practically breaking down the doors to get in - reopened Sam's Pizza Palace at the same 26th Street location in time for Memorial Day weekend. "We never could have gotten through it all without each other," said Rosemary Zuccarello, 53, whose father, Sam Spera, started it all in 1957 with a small steak sandwich shop a few blocks away, eventually moving, adding pizza, and taking over the Shore Plaza Motel.
NEWS
December 9, 2001 | By Joseph S. Kennedy INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Adolph G. Rosengarten Jr. is best remembered as a Main Line gentleman who helped create Chanticleer, an arboretum on his family estate in Wayne. Yet Rosengarten also was a decorated soldier who was involved in one of the most significant espionage developments of World War II. "I had intended to be known as a good landscape gardener, not a spy," Rosengarten wrote in 1974 after his involvement in the Allies' intelligence work became public knowledge. In early 1941, Rosengarten, then 35, went on active military duty and ended up with a coastal artillery unit, which was disbanded in 1943.
NEWS
January 15, 2006 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
A hundred years after the Continental Army occupied the hills around Fort Washington in Montgomery County, several prominent Philadelphia families came together to encamp there for a longer stay. They were the Fells and the Drexels, new scions of the Gilded Age. In 1882, they brought their fabulous fortunes to Camp Hill, built several stone mansions along the sprawling ridge, and lay the foundation of a colorful, 70-year tenancy. Theirs is a story marked by privilege and intrigue and perhaps even murder, said Lew and Trudy Keen, who will present a multimedia program on Camp Hill Hall at 8 p.m. Tuesday at Clifton House in Fort Washington.
FOOD
August 16, 2013 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Kismet brought the professor and the businessman together. Coffee keeps them there. The two strangers sat next to each other at a local-food lecture last year and hit it off. The result: an unusual partnership between Stephen R. Madigosky, environmental science professor at Widener University, and John Sacharok, chief executive officer of Golden Valley Farms coffee roasters in West Chester, that brought forth WU Brew, an earth-friendly coffee brand...
BUSINESS
May 7, 2013 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Columnist
In even the most functional family, there can be a painful something that triggers a strong emotional response, despite the passage of time. For the Benders, it's the digital camera. "Digital killed the family business," Ben Bender says. Yet digital just might be the route to a family-business revival, as well. Bender has become the region's only franchise owner for TapSnap, a social-media-equipped replacement for the party photo booth. To fully appreciate this cycle of commercial irony - a primary motivator of which was his cancer scare three years ago - a little history is required.
NEWS
January 4, 1996 | By Sharon Tubbs, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Louis J. Eni, 74, of Medford, president and chief operating officer of Dietz & Watson Meats in Philadelphia, died yesterday at Hahnemann University Hospital. Mr. Eni joined Dietz & Watson more than 40 years ago and ran the company for the last 20 years. He is credited with aiding the company's growth into a multimillion-dollar business with customers worldwide and more than 400 employees, said his daughter Cynthia E. Yingling of Medford. According to Mr. Eni's three children, Dietz & Watson is "truly a family business in every sense of the word.
NEWS
September 25, 2013 | By Julie Zauzmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lachlan Pitcairn's life revolved around family. Born into a prominent Pennsylvania clan, he devoted his career to the family business and his leisure time to hosting gatherings full of music for his many relatives. He was a proud patriarch, with 21 grandchildren and 18 great-grandchildren, when he died Wednesday, Sept. 11, at age 91. Six days later, that tally grew when a 19th great-grandchild was born. Mr. Pitcairn died in his home in Bryn Athyn. The cause was pneumonia, his son Scot said.
NEWS
August 18, 1986 | By Dwight Ott, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Dankses are worried. Having fled riots in Camden for the safety of Cherry Hill in the 1970s, they now fear they may have to flee a new kind of upheaval. Charles Danks, 48, pointed to the problem Saturday as he stood along Route 70 near the flow of traffic into the Race Track Circle. Before him in the concrete were two red paint marks that he said spell doom for his family business - marks that show where the State of New Jersey plans to chop 29 feet out of his Sunoco station property to widen the highway that is a main thoroughfare through the township of 70,000.
NEWS
February 21, 1990 | By Melissa Dribben and John Ellis, Special to The Inquirer Inquirer correspondent S.E. Siebert contributed to this article
Whitpain Detective William Pistilli said the case was closed. Police do not know what drove Nicholas Malantonio to such desperation that he set off Monday afternoon with a .357 revolver to kill his father, the mother of his children and then himself. After questioning the young man's family for hours, Pistilli said, they may never know. "We know the end result - that's it," he said. The Montgomery County Coroner's Office completed autopsies yesterday on Malantonio, a 25-year-old unemployed man from Blue Bell; Faye Keohane, the 25- year-old mother of his two children, and Matthew Malantonio, 69, his father.
NEWS
March 25, 2014
A story in Sunday's Arts & Entertainment section misstated the name of one of Lyric Fest's cofounders. She is Laura Ward. A story Monday about a new Narberth business, CashinMyBag.com, incorrectly attributed ownership of another Zakroff family business, Goldkit.com and 1-800 Goldkit. They were affiliates of Lippincott Inc., solely owned by Shelley Zakroff, now Shelley Romm, until its sale in 2007. A story in Monday's Local News section incorrectly described the crowd at Sunday's Mass at St. Francis Xavier Catholic Church in Fairmount South.
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