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NEWS
October 24, 1989 | By Donna St. George, Inquirer Staff Writer
Henry Faulkner Jr., 62, chairman of the Faulkner Inc. Oldsmobile and Mitsubishi dealership in Northeast Philadelphia, died Sunday at Abington Memorial Hospital. He was a resident of Huntingdon Valley for 27 years and previously lived in Willow Grove. Mr. Faulkner started his career in the automobile industry in the parts department of the Oldsmobile dealership on Rising Sun Avenue in the Northeast that his father founded in 1932. It was 1956 when Mr. Faulkner became president of the dealership, which by then had moved to Cottman Avenue.
NEWS
September 21, 1994 | By Daniel Rubin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The cavernous shell that was reduced to rubble in North Philadelphia Monday night bore little resemblance to the bustling mill that for a century turned out fine curtains, carpets and tablecloths, and stitched together a hard- working neighborhood. For most of its life, the eight-building fortress at Fourth and Lehigh was called Quaker Lace Co., a Philadelphia institution started by Joseph H. Bromley in 1894. In its heyday, 100 looms ran at once, with English, French and Irish artisans producing delicate doilies and 40-foot-wide expanses of fabric.
BUSINESS
June 26, 2016 | By Diane Mastrull, Staff Writer
Mary Livingston didn't need to utter a word. As an African American woman, her presence said it all. But she said what she came to say anyway. "We have really transitioned from the look of old, retired white guys," she told her audience one evening in May. Twenty women were participating in a retirement- planning course offered by the Women's Opportunities Resource Center. Livingston was there to explain how her business- mentoring organization, SCORE Philadelphia, was changing - starting with her appointment as its first female leader.
BUSINESS
September 17, 2013 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
With his company's name on the baseball park, Daniel K. Fitzpatrick, 50, president of Citizens Bank for Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and Delaware, spends many a fine evening at the bank's skybox, entertaining clients. But his first contact with one famous Phillie came decades earlier. Question: You pitched against Jamie Moyer when he played for St. Joe's and you were at La Salle, right? Answer: We were opposite starting pitchers in a game at La Salle in 1984. After losing that game to Jamie and St. Joe's and seeing his great command of pitch location, I knew I should study harder and prepare for a career outside of baseball.
NEWS
July 22, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Joan H. Hummel, 83, of Philadelphia and Palm Beach, Fla., a businesswoman, died Sunday, July 20, of pneumonia at Temple University Hospital. Mrs. Hummel was married for 57 years to Dennis Hummel. Together, they built the family business, Metropolitan Reporting Bureau, which supplies information to the insurance industry from offices in Center City. Mrs. Hummel grew up in Yeadon and graduated from Yeadon High School. She earned a bachelor's degree in English at Temple University, where she was a cheerleader and president of Alpha Sigma Pi. She and her husband met in the business world of Philadelphia.
NEWS
April 28, 2012 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
Max Reisman, 98, the former chairman and chief executive officer of a South Philadelphia-based pretzel company who is credited with creating the peanut-butter-filled pretzel nugget, died Monday, April 23 at his daughter's home in Kingston, Pa. Mr. Reisman, who lived in Highland Beach, Fla., formerly lived in Wynnewood. He was born on Sept. 18, 1913. in South Philadelphia, a son of Jacob and Eva Reisman and the youngest of five brothers and one sister. Mr. Reisman was a graduate of Overbrook High School.
BUSINESS
June 21, 2006 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
All they could do was stand together, cling to one another, and quietly cry, watching as a December fire destroyed a family business that had stood on the Wildwood boardwalk for nearly 50 years. Five months later, together, they joyously - but without much ceremony because a crowd was practically breaking down the doors to get in - reopened Sam's Pizza Palace at the same 26th Street location in time for Memorial Day weekend. "We never could have gotten through it all without each other," said Rosemary Zuccarello, 53, whose father, Sam Spera, started it all in 1957 with a small steak sandwich shop a few blocks away, eventually moving, adding pizza, and taking over the Shore Plaza Motel.
NEWS
March 23, 2012
Murray Lender, 81, who helped turn his father's small Connecticut bakery into a national company credited with introducing bagels to many Americans, died Wednesday at a hospital in Miami from complications from a fall, his wife, Gillie Lender, said. The couple, who were married more than nine years, lived in Aventura, Fla., and also kept a home in Connecticut. Mr. Lender was perhaps best known from promoting Lender's Bagels in TV commercials. "He was courageous, strong and an example to everyone to show how one should go through life with a vision, ambition, a goal and with success," Gillie Lender said.
NEWS
December 9, 2001 | By Joseph S. Kennedy INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Adolph G. Rosengarten Jr. is best remembered as a Main Line gentleman who helped create Chanticleer, an arboretum on his family estate in Wayne. Yet Rosengarten also was a decorated soldier who was involved in one of the most significant espionage developments of World War II. "I had intended to be known as a good landscape gardener, not a spy," Rosengarten wrote in 1974 after his involvement in the Allies' intelligence work became public knowledge. In early 1941, Rosengarten, then 35, went on active military duty and ended up with a coastal artillery unit, which was disbanded in 1943.
NEWS
January 15, 2006 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
A hundred years after the Continental Army occupied the hills around Fort Washington in Montgomery County, several prominent Philadelphia families came together to encamp there for a longer stay. They were the Fells and the Drexels, new scions of the Gilded Age. In 1882, they brought their fabulous fortunes to Camp Hill, built several stone mansions along the sprawling ridge, and lay the foundation of a colorful, 70-year tenancy. Theirs is a story marked by privilege and intrigue and perhaps even murder, said Lew and Trudy Keen, who will present a multimedia program on Camp Hill Hall at 8 p.m. Tuesday at Clifton House in Fort Washington.
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