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NEWS
February 11, 2012
Nello Ferrara, 93, the candy company executive who brought the world Lemonheads and Atomic Fire Balls, died Feb. 3 at his home in the Chicago suburb of River Forest, Ill., surrounded by his family. Mr. Ferrara took over the family business when he became chairman of Ferrara Pan candy. His father founded the company in 1908. His son Salvatore Ferrara said that Mr. Ferrara created the Lemonhead because he claimed his son's head was shaped like a lemon when he was born. The Atomic Fire Ball came after Mr. Ferrara lived in Japan during World War II. Ferrara Pan candy also makes Red Hots and Boston Baked Beans.
SPORTS
January 31, 2012 | By Pete Schnatz, For The Inquirer
LAKE HARMONY, Pa. - Watching as Dr. Joseph Mattioli's American flag-draped casket was lifted into a waiting hearse, NASCAR president Mike Helton reflected on the legacy of the late Pocono Raceway founder. "He's iconic, and maybe even the last of the pioneers that put NASCAR on the map and kept it there," Helton said. "I think the character and contributions of Doc will last forever. " Those sentiments were shared by the family, friends, fans and racing dignitaries (including NASCAR chairman Brian France)
NEWS
October 26, 2011 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jack M. Demetris, 91, of St. Davids, owner of Demetris Uptown Market in Bridgeport, died of heart failure Friday, Oct. 21, at Genesis Healthcare's Wayne Center. Mr. Demetris emigrated from Greece with his mother and father as an infant. In 1932, his parents opened a food market in Bridgeport. The store had two aisles and everything - sugar, flour, rice - was in barrels, said his son, Dennis. During World War II, Mr. Demetris served in the Army in the Pacific. Among his duties was accompanying celebrities entertaining the troops, including the Andrews Sisters and comedian Joe E. Brown.
NEWS
October 19, 2011 | By Robert Strauss, For The Inquirer
Penni Heritage's family has been farming in Gloucester County for six generations, now that her oldest son, Rich, has decided to go into the family business. But she worries that many of those who have farmed around her husband, Bill, and their family for those decades are less confident of the future than she is. "The business climate is bad, and my neighbors, as they get older, just can't afford the taxes anymore. They aren't moving far away, but maybe to Delaware, where they feel they can live like they have in the past," said Heritage, one of the three Republicans running in hopes of gaining a majority on the seven-member Gloucester County Freeholder Board in the Nov. 8 election.
BUSINESS
September 26, 2011 | By Mike Armstrong, Inquirer Columnist
A little more splash and panache may be associated with the Greater Philadelphia Chamber of Commerce's 29th annual Small Business Excellence Awards in November. The splash comes courtesy of Scott Mirkin , of ESM Productions , who was named the Chamber's small-business person of the year. Founded in 1996, ESM is an event and video-production firm that handled inaugural ceremonies for Gov. Ed Rendell in 2007 and Mayor Nutter in 2008 as well as Welcome America's huge free outdoor concert each July since 2008.
NEWS
August 30, 2011 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
William L. Rosenberger, 84, a retired president of Rosenberger's Dairies, which was founded by his father and grandfather on the family farm in 1925, died of complications from a stroke Thursday at the Dock Woods Community in Lansdale. In his 64 years with the family business, Mr. Rosenberger was known for doing whatever it took to make sure milk arrived on porch doorsteps or on supermarket shelves. Mr. Rosenberger delivered milk door-to-door in glass bottles and hauled large cans of it on company trucks.
BUSINESS
July 25, 2011 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Columnist
As business challenges go, Stephen Klein has known his share. There was the gun shoved in his ribs by a union agent unhappy with his family's nonunion company, long named Anthony, the Family Plumber. And the brick thrown through the living room window of Klein's former home in Philadelphia's Mayfair section. And the beatings and tire slashings endured by his employees. "A nasty time" is how Klein, 58, of Rydal, recently summed up that period in the mid-1970s when the economy was rough, and the region's plumbers even more so. It would be a primer for the business trials ahead - including the loss of a nearly 20-year service contract with Sears that constituted most of Anthony's revenue.
NEWS
July 8, 2011 | By JOHN F. MORRISON, morrisj@phillynews.com 215-854-5573
NYEME TAYLOR was the kind of guy you liked to have around. He had a winning smile and a friendly personality that drew people to him. He also was a devoted family man, who was raising six children as part of an extended family that also included his parents, a grandmother and five brothers and a sister. But Nyeme's brief sojourn in life ended tragically June 26 when he was shot to death in a neighborhood dispute at a party on the Mander Playground in Strawberry Mansion. He was 30. A daughter, Kianna, 15, was hit by a bullet that shattered her left leg, but she is recovering.
BUSINESS
April 28, 2011 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Columnist
For entrepreneurs, the road from inspiration to creation can be long and rocky. But the local companies that shared glimpses of their innovations and business plans Tuesday at Switch Philly, a start-up showcase at the Wharton School, all hope they've traversed the toughest section. One presenter was a Wharton sophomore, Joseph Cohen, founder of Coursekit, which aims to remake the way students and teachers interact online - a field he says has long been dominated by clunky software.
BUSINESS
April 21, 2011 | By Maria Panaritis, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a move that paves the way for a successor to its octogenarian chairman, the Boscov's department-store chain announced Wednesday that a member of the founding family, Jim Boscov, had been named vice chairman of the Reading company. The move came about a year and a half after Boscov, 61, rejoined the company following its emergence from a swift Chapter 11 bankruptcy reorganization orchestrated by chairman Albert Boscov, his 81-year-old uncle. It underscores the family's intention to stay in business, squelching any notion that the company might one day soon be sold to outsiders.
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