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Family Farm

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NEWS
March 18, 1993 | by Michael Zebe, Daily News Staff Writer
A drive past the unemployment office at Grant Plaza, 2901 Grant Ave., may tug at the heartstrings of Somerton resident Ed Comly, but not because he's looking for work. Comly, 68, is retired, having spent 40 years repairing equipment that built machines for the paper box industry at Summerdale Avenue and Pratt Street. So what is it about Grant Plaza that stirs his emotions? It happens to occupy the site of his birthplace and family home, on what used to be a 99- acre truck farm.
NEWS
March 19, 1986 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Biotechnology and computerized management probably will hasten the demise of the hallowed mid-size family farm, according to a new government study. About one million farms - most of them medium-size family operations that are the traditional "backbone of American agriculture" - will disappear between now and the year 2000, according to the 374-page report released Monday by the Office of Technology Assessment, a nonpartisan congressional agency. The report warned that only major changes in government policy could keep the mid-size farms from being eliminated "as a viable force in American agriculture.
NEWS
July 5, 1990 | By Mary Anne Janco, Special to The Inquirer
Charles W. Moore sat quietly on the porch of his old gray farmhouse as a crowd of buyers moved across his 40-acre farm to bid on farm equipment and antiques - artifacts gathered during more than a century of family ownership at the homestead in Middletown Township. "I was born here in this backroom," Moore, 81, said, pointing over his shoulder. "I had a very good life here. " The three-day auction began last Thursday and attracted hundreds of people. Although the farm itself was not for sale, antique farm machinery, antique pistols and shotguns, a rosewood Victorian grand piano and stool, Victorian furniture, old books and records were auctioned.
NEWS
August 1, 2016 | By Dan Geringer, Staff Writer
Twenty-five years ago, developers offered Fred Seipt millions of dollars for his struggling Freddy Hill Farms in Lansdale. He said no. Instead of taking the money and watching his three-generation farm become yet another Montgomery County subdivision, Seipt gambled on building two lavish miniature golf courses, a driving range, a pro shop, and baseball batting cages. He bet the farm, and he won. Celebrating its 25th anniversary this month, Freddy's Family Fun Center helps support 180 acres of feed corn and 20 acres of pumpkins, plus an ice cream-making operation.
NEWS
October 22, 1992 | By Jane M. Reynolds, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Neil H. Pastore Sr., 86, who following careers as a teacher and engineer returned home to run the family farm in the Elm section of Winslow Township, died Monday at Kessler Memorial Hospital, Hammonton. An electrical engineering graduate of Drexel University, Mr. Pastore worked for General Electric in Philadelphia from 1928 to 1933. When the Depression took away his engineering job, he turned to teaching. "Engineering never recovered until the 1940s, and by that time he was pretty involved in teaching," said said one of his sons, Neil Pastore Jr. He earned a teaching degree from the University of Pennsylvania in 1934 and went to work at Hammonton High School, where he taught chemistry and physics from 1934 to 1970.
NEWS
March 16, 1989 | By Meryll Hansen, Special to The Inquirer
Dorothy Hicks, a longtime East Goshen resident, will be able to continue operating her milk store and deli for three years at its current location. The township Board of Supervisors, at Tuesday night's special workshop session with the Planning Commission, voted unanimously to allow Hicks the right to run the store even though 50 percent of the products sold there no longer originate from the family farm, as required by the township. Hicks had petitioned for a variance after the family's dairy herd was sold and the shop began purchasing milk from an outside farm.
NEWS
October 1, 1989 | By Denise Breslin Kachin, Special to The Inquirer
October is pumpkin month in Chester County, and many local farms open their fields to pickers who want to turn the orange squash into jack-o'-lanterns and pies. When Sam and Melba Matthews of the Milky Way Farm in Chester Springs were looking for a pick-your-own crop to supplement their 100-acre dairy farm, friends suggested they try pumpkins. "Harvesting pumpkins fits in with the routine of a dairy farm," Melba Matthews said. "By the end of September, the corn and alfalfa we grow for feed has been harvested.
NEWS
July 18, 1991 | By Marego Athans, Special to The Inquirer
It was once a bustling place, a 30-acre farm whose corn, sweet potatoes, peppers, peaches, cows, chickens and pigs fed nine Jacobi children and packed markets in Burlington County and whose tomatoes filled cans of Campbell's soup at the company's factory in Camden. On summer weekends, cousins from Philadelphia would visit. There was always a baseball game - girls vs. boys - next to the family's white colonial farmhouse, now more than 200 years old. On its wide screened-in porch, Antonio Jacobi held court, telling stories while rabbits and pheasants ventured into the yard and a mockingbird sang in a black walnut tree, whose branches graced the entrance to the house.
NEWS
April 15, 1991 | By Larry King, Inquirer Staff Writer
They called it simply "the farm," a happy weekend retreat where summer memories took root. Anna and John Wissinger, two graying siblings from Philadelphia, bought the land in the early 1960s. It was a 44-acre tract in eastern Montgomery County, developed only so far as the 18th-century stone house that graced the south end. On warm afternoons, the Wissingers held barbecues there, roasting sausages for cousins, friends and neighborhood children. Today, the stone house is gone, torn down after an arsonist burned it in 1987.
FOOD
August 19, 2016 | By Samantha Melamed, Staff Writer
On a recent morning at Lundale Farm, a 520-acre spread in Chester County, Kim Albano of Ironstone Creamery was on her way to feed her pigs while, in the next field over, Emma Cunniff and Noah Cohen of Kneehigh Farm were dropping scallion and lettuce starts into soil freshly tilled into tidy rows. Cattle from Wyebrook Farm grazed on a hillside, beehives were stacked like condos near a strip of woodland, and, in a greenhouse, flats of True Leaf Microgreens' miniature basil, sorrel, and cilantro made a green patchwork, like an aerial view of the farmland that once dominated this region.
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FOOD
August 19, 2016 | By Samantha Melamed, Staff Writer
On a recent morning at Lundale Farm, a 520-acre spread in Chester County, Kim Albano of Ironstone Creamery was on her way to feed her pigs while, in the next field over, Emma Cunniff and Noah Cohen of Kneehigh Farm were dropping scallion and lettuce starts into soil freshly tilled into tidy rows. Cattle from Wyebrook Farm grazed on a hillside, beehives were stacked like condos near a strip of woodland, and, in a greenhouse, flats of True Leaf Microgreens' miniature basil, sorrel, and cilantro made a green patchwork, like an aerial view of the farmland that once dominated this region.
NEWS
August 1, 2016 | By Dan Geringer, Staff Writer
Twenty-five years ago, developers offered Fred Seipt millions of dollars for his struggling Freddy Hill Farms in Lansdale. He said no. Instead of taking the money and watching his three-generation farm become yet another Montgomery County subdivision, Seipt gambled on building two lavish miniature golf courses, a driving range, a pro shop, and baseball batting cages. He bet the farm, and he won. Celebrating its 25th anniversary this month, Freddy's Family Fun Center helps support 180 acres of feed corn and 20 acres of pumpkins, plus an ice cream-making operation.
NEWS
April 17, 2016 | By Melanie Burney and Rita Giordano, STAFF WRITERS
Second-generation Burlington County farmer Anthony Russo III made a mark on the business he loved as an advocate and mentor and role model for New Jersey farmers. Russo, 73, a respected longtime farmer and pillar in the rural Tabernacle community, died Thursday afternoon after a tragic accident at his farm. Russo, who owned Russo's Fruit & Vegetable Farm in Tabernacle, was struck by a tractor about 1:50 p.m., New Jersey State Police said Friday. He was rushed by medics to Virtua Memorial Hospital in Mount Holly, where he was pronounced dead a short time later.
NEWS
March 23, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
Eva Mae Mayfield, 72, of Philadelphia, died Sunday, March 6, at Crozer-Chester Medical Center of injuries she suffered in a Feb. 1 fire at her home. Mrs. Mayfield was lighting a candle when the flame got away from her, said her son, Carl A. She was hospitalized in critical condition and never recovered enough to leave the facility. The Delaware County Medical Examiner's Office ruled that Mrs. Mayfield's death was accidental. The cause was smoke inhalation and burns. Born in South Boston, Va., to John Isaac and Kate Stephens Lewis, she was reared on the family farm with 13 brothers and sisters.
FOOD
February 5, 2016 | By Samantha Melamed, Staff Writer
The reformed marijuana grower and the ex-Wall Street banker make an unlikely duo, working side by side in an old South Philadelphia factory building where - despite the chill outside - the air is warm, humid, and sweetened by hundreds of basil plants. Lee Weingrad, the grower, and Jack Griffin, the businessman, have great hopes for this "vertical" farm, where hydroponic herbs, microgreens, and tomatoes crowd together in troughs stacked almost to the ceiling. This is Metropolis Farms.
NEWS
August 21, 2014 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
At the farm at Camphill Village Kimberton Hills in Chester County, the stalks on the chard are a startling fire-truck red. The eggplants, shiny as the Lexuses and Mercedeses in the parking lot, offer mirrorlike reflections of moneyed folk with the luck and good sense to eat well. Flawless, fabulous vegetables have long been a perk of the middle and upper classes, who could afford to pay as much as $765 for 24 weeks of produce as part of the community supported agriculture program (CSA)
NEWS
August 19, 2014 | By Laura McCrystal, Inquirer Staff Writer
MECHANICSVILLE, Va. - It was only July, but Martha Trinca was thinking about Christmas. This year was going to be special. Her older sister Theresa was coming. Among the 10 Hunt children, Theresa stood out. The fiercely independent redhead had left the family farm, put herself through college, and reinvented herself as a social worker in Philadelphia. So on July 24, Trinca sat at her home outside Richmond, scribbling a list of possible Christmas presents. Hunt, 53, did not have many needs.
NEWS
August 8, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
SOME PHILLY storekeepers winced when they saw Emma Lee McBurnette coming through the door. Emma Lee had a sharp eye for bargains, and no patience for what she considered overpricing. "That's not worth the price," she might say about an item. "I won't pay it. " More often than not, Emma Lee got her way. The merchants saw the error of their ways and adjusted the prices accordingly. And far from wanting to ban Emma Lee from their stores, most merchants realized that she was right more often than not and willingly amended their larcenous ways.
NEWS
July 9, 2014 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
The locally renowned lima beans will be back soon at Taylor River Side Farm in Cinnaminson. The latest generations of Taylors are back already. "It feels like home," Peter Taylor, 46, says, sitting on a grand Victorian porch that offers a silvery view of the Delaware River. A child welfare worker and practicing Quaker who grew up in Atlantic County, Taylor had been living in Toronto until last summer. After an aunt and uncle who had been tending the farm retired to California, Taylor moved back to South Jersey with his wife, Lily, and their daughter, Abby.
NEWS
July 6, 2014 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
Seiji H. Moriuchi, of Moorestown, 35, a third-generation flower farmer, died in his sleep Monday, June 30. The cause of death has yet to be determined, said his brother Naoji, but he had been in poor health following a fall last year. Mr. Moriuchi grew up on the family farm at Borton Landing and Hartford Roads, and graduated from Moorestown Friends School in 1998, where he was captain of the soccer and baseball teams and also played basketball. During his senior year, he received the Herm McGee Award, given to the male and female athletes who have made a significant contribution to athletics at Moorestown Friends during the school year.
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