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Family History

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NEWS
January 10, 1986 | By Ellen Goodman
The photo album, covered in worn green velvet and held together with ornate brass hinges, lay in a jumble of lace and candlesticks on an old table. It was, like everything else in the hall, a piece of used goods, the refuse of previous owners. Or, if you prefer, an antique. I opened the album the way someone in the market for a new home might read the real-estate listings. Was this property something that would suit my family? I thought no more of the former owners than I might have thought of the family who planted the tree in the backyard or added the dormers to the roof of a house for sale.
NEWS
August 27, 1986 | By Kitty Dumas, Inquirer Staff Writer
As long as there has been a county called Gloucester, there have been Tomlinsons in Gloucester County. But their 300 years in South Jersey do not seem like very long for the Tomlinsons of this century. Family members talk easily and with conviction about relatives who lived more than 100 years ago, as though they knew them personally, as though the events of their ancestors' lives occurred just yesterday. On Saturday, the Tomlinsons took part in what is for other families a summertime ritual but for them was quite out of the ordinary.
NEWS
August 19, 2016 | By Kevin Riordan, Columnist
The new hobby Edgar Stern had been searching for was there all along. "My grandfather made this in the 1930s, in Germany," the 89-year-old Cinnaminson resident says, holding up a hand-carved wooden plaque, known as a mizrach, of the type often found in Jewish homes. "I was looking for something new to do, and it gave me an idea," adds Stern, who was barely 9 when he and his family fled Hitler's Germany. "Why don't I try woodworking?" Since that inspiration about four years ago, the retired therapist has crafted dozens of decorative objects in his meticulously organized workshop and given most away.
NEWS
March 7, 2000 | By Stacey Burling, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
While the procedure that Today show viewers can watch Katie Couric get this morning - a colonoscopy - is considered the best test for colorectal cancers, few doctors recommend it for patients her age who have no family history or symptoms of the disease. A taped segment on the 43-year-old Couric having the procedure, which involves threading a flexible tube with a lighted viewing device through the rectum and into the large intestine, is scheduled to be broadcast between 8 and 8:30 a.m. It is part of a series on colon and rectal cancers that runs all week.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 2012 | Dear Abby
DEAR ABBY: My parents are approaching their 80s, and I'd like to recommend to seniors that a cherished gift to their children and grandchildren would be a journal or family history book written by them describing their childhood memories and early married years. Children and grandchildren can be given the chance to see through your eyes and your memories what their aunts, uncles and grandparents were like. The family history can be passed from one generation to the next, and I cannot think of a more special gift.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 2015 | BY CHUCK DARROW, Daily News Staff Writer darrowc@phillynews.com, 215-313-3134
RENNARD EAST was looking for some family history. What he found was American history. For years, East (whose first name is pronounced reh-NARD) had known that his forebears settled in Philadelphia after leaving South Carolina in the 1920s. But he couldn't figure out why they migrated north. Thanks to Kenyatta Berry, one of the sleuths from the PBS series "Genealogy Roadshow," East has learned that the reason for the family's move was, as she put it, "something that changed American history and African-American history.
NEWS
January 26, 1998 | By Malcolm Garcia, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The FBI agent sauntered through the hallways of Abington Friends School, his badge in one hand, a cigar in the other. His mustache was fading beneath his nose, but with his hat tilted rakishly to one side, everyone knew he meant business. Still, he was shorter than most detectives. And his pants were rolled up above his shoes. "He looks better than I did," retired FBI agent Paul Nolan said of the impostor - his 9-year-old grandson and namesake. The younger Paul Nolan was in character, as were 39 other students, for the opening of the Third Grade Museum of Family History.
NEWS
July 24, 2000 | By Lisa Fine and Kate Herman, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
At 3 o'clock yesterday afternoon, Hersey Gray could hear the wind rustling through the soybean fields across the street from his house. Aside from the occasional car passing by, the country lane in front of his home was deserted. Hours earlier, more than 100 relatives had swarmed around his property, hugging and saying their goodbyes as the 20th Walls family reunion came to an end. "This year was different," said Monica Hernandez, who came from Baltimore with her husband, Eduardo, and daughters for the weekend reunion.
NEWS
May 16, 1992 | by Leigh Jackson, Daily News Staff Writer
Paula Woodton, 8 and grinning, pored over faded photographs with her grandmother. Christopher Bonner, also 8 and also grinning, heard his 80-year-old grandfather explain the tale of a knee buckle - a fastener for old-style breeches - owned by the family for 250 years. Tales and family talk were the themes yesterday at the William Meredith Elementary School, 5th and Fitzwater streets. New York Newsday Editor Bill Zimmerman spoke to Meredith students about how to conduct oral histories and then the students gathered histories from visiting grandparents and parents.
NEWS
December 25, 1996 | By Margaret Robinson
Teaching at a university Writing Center, I see reams of student essays on issues such as abortion, capital punishment, NAFTA, AIDS. After a while it gets numbing, for everyone. But recently, a history student came to the center, excited by a different assignment. It was to show the effect of major events of the century on two generations of his family. I wanted to cheer for this student, kiss his professor, and ASAP, talk to my own family. This is the season to do it. When do most of us see Mom and Dad, Uncle Jack, Cousin Marvin and Grandma Rosa, the ones who know the dirt, the stories, the family history?
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 19, 2016 | By Kevin Riordan, Columnist
The new hobby Edgar Stern had been searching for was there all along. "My grandfather made this in the 1930s, in Germany," the 89-year-old Cinnaminson resident says, holding up a hand-carved wooden plaque, known as a mizrach, of the type often found in Jewish homes. "I was looking for something new to do, and it gave me an idea," adds Stern, who was barely 9 when he and his family fled Hitler's Germany. "Why don't I try woodworking?" Since that inspiration about four years ago, the retired therapist has crafted dozens of decorative objects in his meticulously organized workshop and given most away.
NEWS
February 29, 2016
Vincent Fraley is communications manager for the Historical Society of Pennsylvania It will perhaps come as no shock that, in terms of website categories, pornography attracts the most traffic. Number two, however, may surprise some: genealogy. Popularized by shows such as Who Do You Think You Are? and Finding Your Roots , genealogy - the study of lines of descent - has become one of the most prevalent pastimes in the United States. Broadly speaking, interest in one's family - alive and dead - is represented in every human society.
BUSINESS
February 7, 2016
Kristina O'Doherty (maiden name Kristina Johnson) knew her family had emigrated from Sweden. But it wasn't until she retired that she found the time to start digging. Cleaning out her parents' house, she discovered that her grandfather had emigrated through Philadelphia. His surname was Johannson, Americanized to Johnson. "It really set me on a course to find out more," she recalls. "I knew my grandparents attended a Swedish Lutheran church in Wilkes-Barre, and that was it. " In 2003, she retired and took a writing class.
NEWS
November 8, 2015 | By Sandy Bauers, For The Inquirer
The news left vegetarians feeling vindicated. It sent meat producers into a tizzy. And it left many others wondering: Do bacon and bologna really cause cancer? Two weeks ago, after a group of 22 scientists reviewed numerous studies, World Health Organization officials concluded that processed meat is carcinogenic, and that eating a couple of slices a day increases a person's risk of colorectal cancer by about 18 percent. But like so many cancer risks, teasing out the details and maintaining perspective is crucial.
NEWS
September 11, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
A MAN WHO could read 15,000 books, give or take a few hundred, was a man to be reckoned with. And Larry Riley was that man. But how to do the reckoning? He was a man whose spiritual journey took him to a Trappist monastery, probably the strictist order in the Roman Catholic Church, yet he was also a man who enjoyed handicapping race horses and cheering on the steeds at Philadelphia Park and the old Garden State track. He earned a Ph.D with a dissertation on the Bolshevik show trials in the Soviet Union instigated by Joseph Stalin in the 1930s to get rid of his rivals.
TRAVEL
June 1, 2015 | By Janis Chakars, For The Inquirer
The children sat impatiently waiting for school to begin, until one of their classmates called them to the window. Crowded around the pane, they watched as KGB men arrested their teacher outside. They never saw him again. Andris told me this story as we stood in the same spot. He was one of those kids. It was after World War II, and Latvia was under Soviet occupation. My grandfather had gone to that school, too, as did his brother, Andris' father. I was traveling with my wife and kids.
TRAVEL
May 18, 2015 | By Mark Rienstra, For The Inquirer
Who would have thought that I had Napoleon to thank for my family name? I certainly didn't when we started our trek through Friesland as part of our son Joel's graduation trip. I knew that my ancestors emigrated from this mostly rural province of Holland in the late 1800s, but I did not know many other details of the family history. Nor did I know of a connection to the diminutive French general. But that is only one interesting tidbit we discovered as we pursued our roots. Renting a car in Amsterdam, we drove through the low-lying farmland near the Ijsselmeer, the large inland lake reclaimed from the North Sea. Passing by windmills (the modern electricity-generating kind)
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 2015 | BY CHUCK DARROW, Daily News Staff Writer darrowc@phillynews.com, 215-313-3134
RENNARD EAST was looking for some family history. What he found was American history. For years, East (whose first name is pronounced reh-NARD) had known that his forebears settled in Philadelphia after leaving South Carolina in the 1920s. But he couldn't figure out why they migrated north. Thanks to Kenyatta Berry, one of the sleuths from the PBS series "Genealogy Roadshow," East has learned that the reason for the family's move was, as she put it, "something that changed American history and African-American history.
TRAVEL
January 5, 2015 | By the Rev. John Shimchick, For The Inquirer
I knew about the three sisters from the letters. In 1912 my grandfather, George, left his village of Siderka (then Russia) about an hour north of Bialystok, and never returned. Throughout his life, his brothers Vladimir and Makary sent him letters. Last year my Uncle Walter gave me a box of their letters and we worked on getting them translated. I am a priest, serving the Orthodox Church of the Holy Cross in Medford, and this effort coincided with a trip our Diocesan Bishop Michael was planning to Poland for August 2014.
NEWS
November 9, 2014 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Candice and Ryan Ismirle sat on a small sofa at Crozer-Chester Medical Center, cradling their 2-day-old twin sons, Ryder and Rafe. Candice Ismirle's cousin and parents hovered nearby. In many ways, it was an archetypal celebration of new life by an extended family. But the scene was also testimony to their defiance - some might say denial - of a grim reality. At 33, Candice Ismirle is battling an aggressive, metastatic breast cancer. She and her husband, who live in Washington, conceived the twins through in vitro fertilization.
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