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Family Law

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NEWS
August 25, 1997 | By Amy S. Newman
The initial premise of Donald J. Middleman (Guest Opinion, Aug. 7), that the system creates problems in families, is shortsighted and fails to acknowledge the accountability of the parties who themselves cause the violence. Any damage to parents, and especially children, can be cured by the parties themselves realizing they are the ones who control how their children are ultimately affected by the proceedings. Parents must realize they are the only ones who can cause or prevent their children from being involved in, much less harmed by, "the system.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 1999 | By Jennifer Weiner, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Here comes the judge! OK, here comes the family-law attorney and former judge pro tem, Mablean (say it Maybelline) Ephraim, who will take up the gavel for the reincarnated Divorce Court, premiering today on Fox Philadelphia at 11 a.m. Ephraim may not be a judge, but 10 minutes in her presence could convince any jury that she's more than qualified to play one on TV, to render binding judgment to the troubled couples who will come before her....
NEWS
August 7, 1997 | BY DONALD J. MIDDLEMAN
The family-law system is a major contributor to family violence, acrimony and damage to both parents and children. The late U.S. Supreme Court Justice William Brennan once said, "Nothing so inflames the human heart as a sense of injustice. " And injustice is the daily stock in trade of the family-law system. Look no further than Family Court, where Dad is ripped off for thousands of dollars. He is subjected to discriminatory laws and practices, cynically opposite to American ideals of fair play, equal treatment, due process or the right to a jury trial.
NEWS
June 15, 2007 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Martin J. Abramson, 62, of Ventnor City, died Monday at Jackson Memorial Hospital in Miami, Fla., three days after attending his daughter's wedding in Jamaica. The cause of death apparently was a "cardiac event," his wife said. Mr. Abramson, an attorney, was a partner in the firm of Abramson, Walker & Moore in Woodbury, where he specialized in family law. He was a fellow with the New Jersey chapter of the American Academy of Matrimonial Lawyers; lectured on matrimonial law for the Gloucester County Bar Association; and was active with "Putting Children First" a county program for all parties going though a divorce who have children under the age of 18. "He put his clients above everything else, and fought like a junkyard dog in court for them," said Clyde Walker, his law partner and longtime friend.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 18, 1996 | By Carlin Romano, INQUIRER BOOK CRITIC
Paula Sharp is both a novelist and lawyer, but please don't judge her on circumstantial evidence. Lawyer/writer stereotypes don't apply. Unlike Louis Auchincloss, she's not a big-time Wall Street attorney, writing of corporate earnings and reeling them in. Unlike Scott Turow, she neither prosecuted felons nor graduated to a Chicago firm. Unlike John Grisham, she doesn't get casting and script approval over the film versions of her books (there are none yet) or make millions writing legal thrillers.
NEWS
January 22, 1999 | By Mark Binker, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Warminster lawyer Marijo M. Murphy, who specializes in divorce, abuse, custody, and other family-court cases, has announced that she will run for Bucks County Common Pleas Court judge this year. Murphy, 56, a Democrat, will be up against two well-known Republican row officers, District Attorney Alan M. Rubenstein and Controller Rae Boylan Thomas. The three will vie to fill two seats on the Bucks County bench, one vacated by William Hart Rufe 3d this month and the other to be vacated by Isaac S. Garb when he retires in June.
BUSINESS
June 14, 2016 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Staff Writer
We're living in a world of single-digit returns. That was the main takeaway from endowment and foundation investment managers at an institutional investor roundtable Thursday in Boston, where most of the top colleges and universities decried the stock market's current low level of returns. The market has run up so much since the Great Recession, there seems to be little room to run further. "I would be tickled to get 3 percent" real returns annually - meaning after inflation - in the current market environment, said John Alexander, chief investment officer of the Clemson University Foundation, who oversees the school's endowment.
NEWS
June 17, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
Lewis Becker, 78, of Villanova, a law professor at Villanova University for more than four decades, died Sunday, June 12, of complications from glioblastoma brain cancer at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. He had been diagnosed in March, his family said. Professor Becker joined what is now Villanova's Charles Widger School of Law in 1972, rose to professor in 1976, and retired in 2011 as an emeritus professor, although he kept teaching for several more years. "Professor Becker left an indelible mark on the Law School community and the generations of students he educated and inspired," the school said in a tribute on its Facebook page.
NEWS
November 1, 2005
Bucks County voters can't go wrong on Nov. 8 in selecting a successor to Common Pleas Court Judge Michael J. Kane, who leaves the bench after nearly two decades handling family legal disputes. Either of two contenders can be expected to serve ably. A strict r?sum? comparison, however, gives Republican JEFFREY L. FINLEY the edge. A member of a large Doylestown firm, Finley was voted "highly recommended" by fellow attorneys in the county. He brings solid and varied litigation experience, including more than 200 assignments as a hearing officer in student disciplinary cases convened by local school districts.
NEWS
February 1, 1998 | By Michelle Crouch, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Attorneys John Maroccia and Eric Spevak are tired of being talking heads. For seven years, they have been giving South Jersey residents the lowdown on the law on their local cable television show, The Law and You. Now, they want to expand the show to include mock trials, mock police arrests and other scenarios. "We want to branch out," said Maroccia, a Voorhees resident. "We hope to become a syndicated show that goes beyond the talking-head stage. I see us doing a show on the anatomy of a real-estate transaction, or a show on what your rights are when you're pulled over by a police officer.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 17, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
Lewis Becker, 78, of Villanova, a law professor at Villanova University for more than four decades, died Sunday, June 12, of complications from glioblastoma brain cancer at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. He had been diagnosed in March, his family said. Professor Becker joined what is now Villanova's Charles Widger School of Law in 1972, rose to professor in 1976, and retired in 2011 as an emeritus professor, although he kept teaching for several more years. "Professor Becker left an indelible mark on the Law School community and the generations of students he educated and inspired," the school said in a tribute on its Facebook page.
BUSINESS
June 14, 2016 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Staff Writer
We're living in a world of single-digit returns. That was the main takeaway from endowment and foundation investment managers at an institutional investor roundtable Thursday in Boston, where most of the top colleges and universities decried the stock market's current low level of returns. The market has run up so much since the Great Recession, there seems to be little room to run further. "I would be tickled to get 3 percent" real returns annually - meaning after inflation - in the current market environment, said John Alexander, chief investment officer of the Clemson University Foundation, who oversees the school's endowment.
NEWS
May 15, 2015 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
The lawyers milled about a second-floor Center City bar, passing out fliers and plugging their last names and ballot numbers. "Think 42, like Jackie Robinson," said Philadelphia Common Pleas Court candidate Jodi Lobel. Anthony Kyriakakis, whose name lines the bottom of the judicial ballot with Lobel's, pushes the "We need good judges, and that's the bottom line" refrain. At a meet-and-greet for judicial candidates Tuesday, more than 30 people running for office swarmed the much smaller group of noncandidates with quick pitches and friendly reminders of who they are. With 15 vacancies - 12 on the Court of Common Pleas and three on Municipal Court - 52 names are on the ballot, a high in recent history.
NEWS
October 20, 2014 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
Riding the escalator in Philadelphia's new Family Court after last week's ribbon-cutting ceremony, I overheard a woman remark that the building didn't turn out as bad as she expected, given the grubby scandal that accompanied its creation. I concur. Sure, Philadelphia's first new courthouse in a generation is a dispiriting example of bland, office-park architecture plunked in the civic heart of the city. The exterior has all the charm of a cardboard box - and the proportions to match.
BUSINESS
July 8, 2014
Sandra Goldberg has been installed as president of the Rotary Club of Philadelphia . She is the owner of SG Consulting/Physical Therapy. Jim Gorman, vice president and general manager of the Philadelphia region for AlliedBarton Security Services, has been named to the executive board of the Citizens' Crime Commission of the Delaware Valley , a nonprofit, nongovernmental advisory and education organization that fights crime by working with law-enforcement agencies...
NEWS
July 1, 2014 | By Clark Mindock, Inquirer Staff Writer
She has been practicing law in South Jersey for three decades, much of that time as a prosecutor in Cherry Hill municipal court. Next month, she will preside over the courtroom. Judith Charny, appointed a municipal judge in Cherry Hill, will be the first woman to serve in that position in the township. A colleague who has known her for decades says Charny brings the right experience and temperament to her new assignment. Charny will be one of three judges to hold the part-time position in the township.
NEWS
May 15, 2014 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - Monica Forte sat in a House hearing room Tuesday, her son Tony wired to an IV in a backpack beside her, and tearfully begged lawmakers to pass a bill to update Pennsylvania's organ-donation law. "There are not enough kids as pediatric donors," Forte told a legislative panel. Tony, who turns 9 next month, was born with an intestinal disease and is on the waiting list for a stomach, liver, and small intestine transplant. He is one of 200 children on the state's waiting list for organ transplants.
NEWS
April 3, 2014
ERIC EPSTEIN and Gene Stilp fight the powers that be. Have for decades. They're loathed and cursed by those who thrive in Pennsylvania's political culture, reason enough to value their efforts. But they also share a commitment to citizen action in a world increasingly disconnected. These days, as elected leaders sit on their hands on any number of issues, such commitment is worth noting. "If you look at the Legislature like an ocean liner," says Stilp, "Eric and I are like tugboats trying to push the bow in the right direction.
NEWS
December 11, 2013 | By Angela Couloumbis, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG The typical victim is female and over 18. A sexually explicit photograph or video of her surfaces on the Internet without her consent - and can get picked up by websites that actively solicit such images. It's been dubbed "revenge porn," because oftentimes it is a former partner or spouse who posts the image out of spite or anger over a breakup. A growing number of states, including Pennsylvania, are crafting legislation to make it a crime to do so. "It was surprising to me how much this goes on and how little many of us hear about it," said Sen. Judy Schwank (D., Berks)
NEWS
November 7, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Herbert R. Weiman Sr., 88, of Wynnewood, an attorney in Philadelphia for 50 years, died Monday, Nov. 4, of cancer at Bryn Mawr Hospital. After training at the University of Pennsylvania Law School, Mr. Weiman maintained a law practice on Allegheny Avenue in Port Richmond and also on John F. Kennedy Boulevard in Center City. His specialty was family law. He chaired the Family Law Section of the Philadelphia Bar Association, and in 1980, was instrumental in enacting a new divorce code for Pennsylvania.
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