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Family Portrait

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NEWS
May 7, 1993 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
"Family Portrait" is the kind of movie that raises questions, the most pertinent of which is rhetorical: You think you've got problems? The movie opens as Cao Depei (Li Zuejian), a commercial photographer living in a cramped apartment with a wife and young son in Beijing, visits an orphanage and meets a child, just arrived from a remote province, who claims to Cao's son. Cao believes his chat with the boy will resolve the misunderstanding. Instead, he discover the boy is indeed his - by his first wife, who had the child after their divorce became final.
NEWS
November 20, 2008
RE JILL PORTER'S Nov. 12 column on the Preston family, who were told they had no right to be in the house the city supposedly gave them: What is wrong with this picture and story? You have three adults and their numerous children who are sharing a home with a mother and grandmother who is about to be evicted. What is wrong with adults who want to continue to live on somebody else's dime year in and year out, having more babies along the way? Shame on these women for not getting out and making a way for themselves and their children.
NEWS
August 15, 2001 | By Thomas Ginsberg INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Families of all kinds migrated from the city's oldest residential neighborhoods in the 1990s, pushing farther into its northern quarter, often led by immigrants. Neighborhoods such as North Philadelphia, Fairmount and South Philadelphia saw a decline in their share of single-parent and married-couple families, while areas along Roosevelt Boulevard saw an increase, according to census figures being released today. "Everybody is trying to escape the violence, the drugs, in North Philadelphia," said Rosaura Molina, 42, a single mother of two originally from Panama, who lived around the heavily Latino Fifth Street corridor for years before settling near Juniata Park.
NEWS
January 14, 2005
MY DAD once told me that you can tell a lot about the character of a man if you look at his shoes. So last week in one of the New York papers was a family portrait of the Bush clan. Our president was sitting down so his cuffs were raised a bit. There it was! - the presidential seal on each boot. Mr. President, when you're sending off men and women to die in your personal little war, keep your monogramed boots in the closet. Yeah! We know you're in charge. Bruce Semigran, Norristown
NEWS
November 18, 1991 | From Michael Lacing
From Michael Lacing: Some things that will take place at this year's Jackson Family Thanksgiving dinner: Brother or sister with smallest earnings during year made to come day early and kill turkey. Straws drawn to see who has to sit next to Dad. Usual agrument over whether Michael's chimp Bubbles should be allowed that second glass of wine. Spirited pre-meal game of football between family attorneys and limo drivers. Usual battle between Latoya and Michael over white meat from turkey.
NEWS
April 21, 2011
Congratulations to The Inquirer and the Acel Moore Career Development Workshop for providing Archbishop Prendergast High School student Christa Oestreich the opportunity to write her wonderful article "A lifetime of lessons learned in the Great Depression" (April 2). I attended the same elementary school as Marie Oestreich - St. Bonaventure. Marie's sister, Catherine (the nurse in the family portrait), and I were in the same classes (eighth grade in 1938 and Little Flower High School in 1942)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 2005 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Like Ang Lee's 1994 family portrait, Eat Drink Man Woman, Alice Wu's Saving Face deals with the ties that bind, and the lies that go with them, among several generations of a close-knit Chinese clan. Set in the teeming Asian-American community of Flushing, Queens, Saving Face stars Michelle Krusiec as Wilhelmina "Wil" Pang, a crackerjack young surgeon for a New York hospital who makes her weekly pilgrimage home from Brooklyn to "swim in the Chinese gene pool," patiently tolerating her mother's efforts to match her with an eligible Chinese guy. One problem: Wil is gay, a fact that her mother (a droll performance from Joan Chen)
ENTERTAINMENT
November 17, 2011 | By Carolyn Hax
Question: My in-laws had a family portrait taken with spouses and grandchildren. Then they wanted a picture with just their nuclear family - again, no problem. But then they wanted another portrait with their nuclear family plus the grandchildren minus the spouses. I thought this was incredibly insensitive and hurtful for the message it sent. Answer: "Incredibly insensitive" is leaving spouses out of every shot. Taking several shots organized by category - nuclear family, blood family, full extended family, single generation - is a smart way to scratch the varied itches of a big crowd.
NEWS
August 20, 2009 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
The oil painting by N.C. Wyeth depicting the artist with his wife and five children is an affectionate rendering of the famously creative brood from Chadds Ford. If you could rotate the canvas 180 degrees, however, and peer through the top layer of paint with a kind of X-ray vision, you would behold a snarling villain, his face lit by the red glare of an iron furnace. In fact, three scientists have done just that, unveiling their find yesterday at an American Chemical Society conference in Washington.
NEWS
May 11, 1995 | by Rick Selvin, Daily News Staff Writer
You have probably seen Mount Airy artist Susan Schary's work without realizing it - and that's a crime, because it is extraordinary. It's also a crime because the pictures she paints often are about crimes, or their aftermath. Schary, 58, is a fine artist, trained in the classical skills of the European masters. But what she's best known for are her courtroom scenes - the ones that bring to a news-hungry public images of legal proceedings in states that still bar cameras from courtrooms.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 10, 2014 | By Terri Akman, For The Inquirer
Julie Bogle, 10, and her sister Mallory, 7, are mean Skylanders players. But surprisingly, so are parents Jeff and Jill. In fact, video games are the Exton family's favorite pastime. It started about three or four years ago when the girls received a Nintendo Wii and had trouble managing the controller and "nunchuk" at the same time, so the parents paired up to help them. "It was fun and quickly became a tradition," recalled Jeff, 38, who says their family now plays together at least once every other week.
NEWS
August 9, 2013 | By Helen Ubinas, Daily News Columnist
RUTH WOODS laid out a few of the family photos she'd been staring at all night on her kitchen table. Marky, at around 12, posing sheepishly in a family portrait. Marky, an awkward teen, holding his cat Fluffy near the family Christmas tree. Marky, with that beaming Woods-family smile, laughing at his grandmother mugging for the camera. Woods, 69, had called me to set the record straight. Or as straight as a grandmother in mourning could, given her unresolved shame and guilt and denial.
NEWS
July 22, 2013 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Contributing Art Critic
'Family friendly," whatever that term might signify in particular applications, appears to be catching on in area art museums as a marketing concept. The phrase really means "child friendly" - that is, the content will either interest children, or amuse them, or at least not bore them. In the best possible scenario, it might even instruct them. "Family friendly" apparently emerged in the smaller regional museums, with exhibitions devoted to the Muppets, sculptures made from plastic Lego bricks, and masterpiece paintings executed in jellybeans.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 2013
"WITNESS: The Art of Jerry Pinkney" headlines Art Splash, a new, multishow, integrated, family-centric summertime exhibit at the Perelman Building of the Philadelphia Museum of Art, on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway. Pinkney's work joins "Candy Coated Wonderland," an environment of textiles from the museum's costume collection, alongside playful ceramics and geometric decals by ever-fun Philadelphia artist Candy Depew. "Family Portrait" offers a photographic view of families, while "All Dressed Up" is a side-by-side comparison of adult and children's fashion.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 17, 2011 | By Carolyn Hax
Question: My in-laws had a family portrait taken with spouses and grandchildren. Then they wanted a picture with just their nuclear family - again, no problem. But then they wanted another portrait with their nuclear family plus the grandchildren minus the spouses. I thought this was incredibly insensitive and hurtful for the message it sent. Answer: "Incredibly insensitive" is leaving spouses out of every shot. Taking several shots organized by category - nuclear family, blood family, full extended family, single generation - is a smart way to scratch the varied itches of a big crowd.
NEWS
April 21, 2011
Congratulations to The Inquirer and the Acel Moore Career Development Workshop for providing Archbishop Prendergast High School student Christa Oestreich the opportunity to write her wonderful article "A lifetime of lessons learned in the Great Depression" (April 2). I attended the same elementary school as Marie Oestreich - St. Bonaventure. Marie's sister, Catherine (the nurse in the family portrait), and I were in the same classes (eighth grade in 1938 and Little Flower High School in 1942)
ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 2010 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
To watch the movie producer Gregoire Canvel (played by Louis-Do de Lencquesaing) walking through the streets of Paris in the heartbreaking Father of My Children is to witness a man with the weight of the world pressing down on him. In the early sequences of Mia Hansen-Love's beautifully observed family portrait, Canvel, wielding a mobile phone (or two), smoking cigarettes, fielding panicky missives from a Swedish film set, is all resilient charm. Sure, he owes millions to labs, to studios, to the banks.
NEWS
August 20, 2009 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
The oil painting by N.C. Wyeth depicting the artist with his wife and five children is an affectionate rendering of the famously creative brood from Chadds Ford. If you could rotate the canvas 180 degrees, however, and peer through the top layer of paint with a kind of X-ray vision, you would behold a snarling villain, his face lit by the red glare of an iron furnace. In fact, three scientists have done just that, unveiling their find yesterday at an American Chemical Society conference in Washington.
NEWS
November 20, 2008
RE JILL PORTER'S Nov. 12 column on the Preston family, who were told they had no right to be in the house the city supposedly gave them: What is wrong with this picture and story? You have three adults and their numerous children who are sharing a home with a mother and grandmother who is about to be evicted. What is wrong with adults who want to continue to live on somebody else's dime year in and year out, having more babies along the way? Shame on these women for not getting out and making a way for themselves and their children.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 2005 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Like Ang Lee's 1994 family portrait, Eat Drink Man Woman, Alice Wu's Saving Face deals with the ties that bind, and the lies that go with them, among several generations of a close-knit Chinese clan. Set in the teeming Asian-American community of Flushing, Queens, Saving Face stars Michelle Krusiec as Wilhelmina "Wil" Pang, a crackerjack young surgeon for a New York hospital who makes her weekly pilgrimage home from Brooklyn to "swim in the Chinese gene pool," patiently tolerating her mother's efforts to match her with an eligible Chinese guy. One problem: Wil is gay, a fact that her mother (a droll performance from Joan Chen)
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