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Family Therapy

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NEWS
July 25, 1991 | By Andy Wallace, Inquirer Staff Writer
Dr. David Rubinstein, 65, who fled Castro's Cuba in 1961 and later became a professor of psychiatry at Temple University and a pioneer in the development of family therapy, died Tuesday at his home in Penn Valley. Born and educated in Havana, Dr. Rubinstein received a medical degree from the Havana University School of Medicine in 1951. He did postgraduate work at Temple University Medical Center in 1956 and 1957. He left Cuba in 1961. "He was not siding at all with communist government, which was making strong suggestions that there would be some dealing with him if he did not promote the government," his son Leonard said.
NEWS
August 22, 2005 | By Shirley Wang INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Last year, 10-year-old John Stagliano of Newark, Del., was so anxious that he no longer wanted to play baseball, speak up in class, or sleep alone. But, after 16 weeks of treatment that included his parents, John is back on his own at night, looking forward to school, and building a batting average that's better than ever. And his parents have learned how to change some behaviors to help their son. The family's experience at a Temple University clinic shows how children do not become anxious or fearful in a vacuum.
NEWS
May 12, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
Morris X. Johnson, 54, of Mount Airy, a former amateur wrestling champion who later was a family therapist, died Saturday, April 23, of complications from diabetes at Wissahickon Hospice in Philadelphia. Mr. Johnson was born in Nashville and reared in Sacramento, Calif. He took up wrestling in his sophomore year at Sacramento High School to stay in shape for baseball, according to a remembrance on the website thecaliforniawrestler.com. But after falling in love with wrestling, he decided to pursue it. At San Francisco State University, Mr. Johnson was an NCAA Division II finalist in the heavyweight class in 1983 and won that class in 1984.
NEWS
August 25, 2001 | By Rusty Pray INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
James L. Framo, 79, a former professor of psychology at Temple University and an early practitioner of family and marital therapy, died Wednesday of a stroke at his home in San Diego. A native of South Philadelphia, Dr. Framo had been living in California since 1983, when he joined the faculty of United States International University, now Alliant International University, in San Diego. He retired and received emeritus status in 1999. Dr. Framo taught at Temple from 1973 to 1983 and also served as chief of the family-therapy unit at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital from 1969 to 1973.
NEWS
March 16, 1998 | By Thomas J. Brady, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Alyce Renee Collier Higginbotham, 40, a family therapist, died Thursday at her Philadelphia home. She was awaiting a lung transplant. Her last position in a long career in family therapy was as senior counselor and assistant director of the Penn Women's Center at the University of Pennsylvania. Mrs. Higginbotham was a graduate of the Philadelphia High School for Girls and received a bachelor of arts degree in psychology from the University of Pennsylvania, where she was the first president of the Penn Gospel Choir.
NEWS
April 7, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Braulio Montalvo, 80, formerly of Lafayette Hill, a pioneering family therapist who did much of his work at the Philadelphia Child Guidance Clinic, died Monday, March 31, of pulmonary fibrosis at his home in Albuquerque, N.M. He was raised in Aguadilla, Puerto Rico, and lived in Fort Lee, N.J.; Mount Airy; and the Philadelphia suburbs before moving to Albuquerque in 1985 to care for his aging mother. Although he had dreams of becoming a cartoonist or a sculptor, the intuitive Mr. Montalvo gravitated toward the field of family therapy.
LIVING
April 8, 1997 | By Murray Dubin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Duane told his mother that it wasn't her fault. "I had felt, maybe, I didn't do the right thing," Carol Gant says. "I felt bad. It's hard to know where your kids are and what they're doing after they're grown. " And he told her "he loved me a lot. He never had said that before. " Duane Gant, 32, is in prison on a burglary charge and a parole violation that he says were related to drug and alcohol problems. He talked to his mother and father as part of a unique federally funded program in which only a few hundred inmates participate locally and which is not available elsewhere.
NEWS
April 29, 1993 | By Mary Anne Janco, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Township Council has given the go-ahead for a drug and alcohol prevention and treatment program for adolescents at the Ogden House on the county-owned Fair Acres campus. The county needed the township's approval for a governmental use in a residential district. The building, formerly used for adolescent foster care, is at Middletown and Old Forge Roads. The day program would include treatment for the adolescents as well as family therapy, said Sandra Purcell, executive director of the Delaware County Alcohol and Drug Commission.
NEWS
June 9, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
JIM KELLY devoted his life to helping others, including needy children, teens, couples having difficulties with their marriage and families needing some sound counseling. "He was very kind," said his daughter, Jane Kelly-Brobbey. "He had a lot of wisdom and a lot of spirit. " James H. Kelly, who worked for a number of psychological and residential service agencies and was a case worker for the Philadelphia Department of Human Services, an Army veteran of the Korean War and active churchman, died May 4. He was 86 and lived in East Mount Airy.
NEWS
March 17, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
A memorial service will be held Saturday, March 22, for retired psychiatrist Arthur C. Huntley, 83, formerly of Radnor, who died Sunday, Feb. 23, at Bryn Mawr Hospital. The service is planned for 11 a.m. at Dunwoody Village, a retirement community at 3500 W. Chester Pike, Newtown Square, where Dr. Huntley had lived for the last few years. Dr. Huntley, who died from complications after falling, was a professor of psychiatry at the Medical College of Pennsylvania. His wife, Ann Abbott, said he was active in the Philadelphia psychiatric community for more than 50 years, specializing in family and individual therapy.
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NEWS
May 12, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
Morris X. Johnson, 54, of Mount Airy, a former amateur wrestling champion who later was a family therapist, died Saturday, April 23, of complications from diabetes at Wissahickon Hospice in Philadelphia. Mr. Johnson was born in Nashville and reared in Sacramento, Calif. He took up wrestling in his sophomore year at Sacramento High School to stay in shape for baseball, according to a remembrance on the website thecaliforniawrestler.com. But after falling in love with wrestling, he decided to pursue it. At San Francisco State University, Mr. Johnson was an NCAA Division II finalist in the heavyweight class in 1983 and won that class in 1984.
NEWS
June 9, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
JIM KELLY devoted his life to helping others, including needy children, teens, couples having difficulties with their marriage and families needing some sound counseling. "He was very kind," said his daughter, Jane Kelly-Brobbey. "He had a lot of wisdom and a lot of spirit. " James H. Kelly, who worked for a number of psychological and residential service agencies and was a case worker for the Philadelphia Department of Human Services, an Army veteran of the Korean War and active churchman, died May 4. He was 86 and lived in East Mount Airy.
NEWS
April 7, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Braulio Montalvo, 80, formerly of Lafayette Hill, a pioneering family therapist who did much of his work at the Philadelphia Child Guidance Clinic, died Monday, March 31, of pulmonary fibrosis at his home in Albuquerque, N.M. He was raised in Aguadilla, Puerto Rico, and lived in Fort Lee, N.J.; Mount Airy; and the Philadelphia suburbs before moving to Albuquerque in 1985 to care for his aging mother. Although he had dreams of becoming a cartoonist or a sculptor, the intuitive Mr. Montalvo gravitated toward the field of family therapy.
NEWS
March 17, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
A memorial service will be held Saturday, March 22, for retired psychiatrist Arthur C. Huntley, 83, formerly of Radnor, who died Sunday, Feb. 23, at Bryn Mawr Hospital. The service is planned for 11 a.m. at Dunwoody Village, a retirement community at 3500 W. Chester Pike, Newtown Square, where Dr. Huntley had lived for the last few years. Dr. Huntley, who died from complications after falling, was a professor of psychiatry at the Medical College of Pennsylvania. His wife, Ann Abbott, said he was active in the Philadelphia psychiatric community for more than 50 years, specializing in family and individual therapy.
NEWS
February 14, 2014
OF THE 13 million couples who expect to become engaged this year, half will do so on Valentine's Day, according to a spending and saving survey by American Express. The midwinter romantic holiday and the upcoming high season for weddings prompted one mother to ask me to offer some advice to her two daughters who recently got engaged. She wrote: "My husband and I are heading into retirement and, like everyone, we wonder if we have planned to maintain a lifestyle we envision. We have saved money for our two daughters' weddings.
NEWS
March 13, 2012 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
BEFORE WE marvel that there are 30 percent fewer Philly kids in foster care or delinquent placement today than three years ago, let's marvel that Rashan Clarke survived the system at all. From the age of 3 months until he aged out of foster care last year, Rashan, 18, bounced from placement to placement. A few of his caregivers were well-intentioned, he says, but those relationships were short-lived. Mostly, he endured abuse or neglect by people who were supposed to protect and care for him. "Too many of them are just in it for the money.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 2007 | HOWARD GENSLER Daily News wire services contributed to this report
PARIS HILTON may not want to admit it, but Tattle thinks prison agreed with her. In the first photos of her exiting the slammer she looked healthy - did we see hips? - and, dare we say it, happy. Of course she was happy to be free, but she looked really happy, like a kid looks happy, with a real smile and happy eyes, not her usual pasted-on smirk-smile. Her face looked a little fuller, her hair more natural, every expression and turn wasn't posed. Hard as it is to imagine, Paris looked . . . real.
NEWS
August 22, 2005 | By Shirley Wang INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Last year, 10-year-old John Stagliano of Newark, Del., was so anxious that he no longer wanted to play baseball, speak up in class, or sleep alone. But, after 16 weeks of treatment that included his parents, John is back on his own at night, looking forward to school, and building a batting average that's better than ever. And his parents have learned how to change some behaviors to help their son. The family's experience at a Temple University clinic shows how children do not become anxious or fearful in a vacuum.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 2002 | By DAVID BLEILER & DAVID GORGOS For the Daily News
The family dynamic has come under close scrutiny recently in a handful of first-rate movies and TV shows. The Fishers from "Six Feet Under" certainly extract the fun from dysfunction. In "Signs," a possible alien invasion takes a back seat to family therapy. And fathers and sons have new sins visited upon them in "Road to Perdition. " The family dynamic, however, has rarely been presented with such raw and unsettling power as in the brilliant "In the Bedroom" (VHS: priced for rental; DVD: $29.99)
NEWS
December 3, 2001 | By Rusty Pray INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sally Green, 71, a University of Pennsylvania psychologist whose course on human sexuality entertained, amused and, most important, informed students for 20 years, died Nov. 23 of complications from leukemia at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. She had been a resident of Haverford. Mrs. Green's course was the "kind you slept over to get into," said Eliot Kaplan, former editor of Philadelphia Magazine, who managed to find his way into the course in 1978 as a senior majoring in political science.
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