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Family Tree

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NEWS
March 29, 1987 | By Howard Gensler, Special to The Inquirer
If you ever find yourself in a room with Father Edson Wood, don't start bragging about your sort-of-famous second cousin. Father Wood might trot out his great-uncle Charlemagne. Don't tell Father Wood that deep in your past someone in the family signed an obscure township ordinance. One of Wood's ancestors, King John, signed the Magna Carta. And 15 of the 25 nobles who signed the document to keep John honest also are on Wood's sequoia-sized family tree. The 40-year-old Augustinian priest's search for his family's past started about four years ago when he was assistant to the president of Catholic University in Washington, D.C. In one of Father Wood's classes was Chris Haley, nephew of Alex Haley of Roots fame, who would tell the most fascinating stories about the work his uncle had done.
NEWS
May 10, 2013 | By Ellen Gray
* FAMILY TREE. 10:30 p.m. Sunday, HBO.   ANCESTOR worship's all the rage these days. So HBO's newest comedy, "Family Tree," about a man tracing his roots, should have built-in appeal for those not already sold by the name of co-creator Christopher Guest ("Best in Show," "Waiting for Guffman"). A writer, composer, director and actor known for improvisational comedies structured like documentaries (and for being married to Jamie Lee Curtis), Guest, who says the show was inspired by his own ventures into genealogy, boasts an ancestry that's probably more hoity-toity than that of most people scrolling Ancestry.com.
NEWS
May 15, 1988 | By Lisa G. Karoly, Special to The Inquirer
The writing on the green leaflet was sketchy and shaded in black. It read "Searching for Your Roots," and it sounded almost like a trip through past lives, or an astrological charting of your suns, moons and stars. What it turned out to be was not quite so exotic: a lecture on the basics of genealogical research presented by Shawn Aubitz Wednesday night at the Tacony branch of the Free Library. Aubitz, an archivist with the Philadelphia Branch of the National Archives in Center City, introduced his topic by emphasizing the sometimes insurmountable task of doing what he does.
NEWS
July 10, 1988 | By Patricia Hall, Special to The Inquirer
As the crowd of people talked, laughed and embraced in Croshaw Park, Oren Davis walked back and forth, snapping pictures. He said he wanted to remember everyone he met that day. That might have seemed a bit unusual - he was at his own family reunion. "Oh, I don't know half of the people here," said Davis. "Our family is so spread apart that some of us barely ever see each other. " Davis, who lives in North Carolina, was just one of 86 members of the Davis clan that had gathered in Wrightstown during the Fourth of July weekend for its first official family reunion.
NEWS
June 28, 1987 | By Paul Duggan, Inquirer Staff Writer
When she saw the expressions that came over the faces of the children last Sunday, the sheer fascination they showed, Ann McCay knew that her work had been worth it. A family tree - a scroll bearing nearly 300 names, the product of countless hours of genealogical research in the last four years - was spread the length of a half-dozen picnic tables at Hibernia Park in West Caln Township. It was the centerpiece of a Father's Day gathering of relatives who, until recently, had no idea that one another existed.
NEWS
June 29, 2015 | By Mike Newall, Inquirer Columnist
Tootsie Iovine-D'Ambrosio turned over a menu the other morning and sat down at her counter to sketch a family tree. A family tree of all the Iovines who work at the Reading Terminal Market. All 17 of them. "Let's see," she said, beginning with her and brother's spot: Tootsie's Salad Express. There's her brother, Tony. Shy Tony, who handles all the books, bills, and worrying. Young Tony, who's learning the ropes from dad. Her daughter Maria, who's as outgoing as her mom, and Maria's adorable little Vinnie.
NEWS
May 13, 2013 | By David Hiltbrand, INQUIRER TV CRITIC
You have to give Christopher Guest credit: When he finds a comedy style that works for him, he sticks with it. Since This Is Spinal Tap in 1984, he has devoted himself to deadpan mockumentaries like Best in Show and Waiting for Guffman , using a loyal troupe of improv-adept actors including Michael McKean, Fred Willard, Catherine O'Hara, and John Michael Higgins. In his new eight-episode series for HBO, Family Tree , premiering at 10:30 p.m. Sunday, Guest uses his oft-imitated technique (e.g., The Office and Modern Family )
NEWS
September 26, 1993 | By Nancy Lawson, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Paul Pennypacker's family tree reads like the index of an American history textbook. The Tredyffrin police chief is the descendant of a Pennsylvania governor, a Pennsylvania canal commissioner, two members of the Pennsylvania Legislature, a U.S. senator from Virginia, a Revolutionary War U.S. Army major general, a state treasurer in Tennessee, two Civil War generals, four Civil War colonels, 22 Civil War commissioned officers, and more than 100...
NEWS
December 27, 1987 | By Linda Stewart, Special to The Inquirer
Is your name Buchman, Kramer, Ziegler or Schwartz? If your name is of German, Polish, Baltic or Russian origin, and if your family came to this country between 1850 and 1914, it's possible that detailed records of your ancestors' immigration to America are yours for the asking in Hamburg, West Germany. The search for clues to your family's roots can personalize a trip to West Germany, making for an interesting adventure that goes beyond the usual European vacation rounds of museums, historic sites and restaurants.
NEWS
December 16, 2007 | By Zack Price FOR THE INQUIRER
We were alone above the river, on a tiny slippery path in the Columbia River Gorge. Above us was a steep cliff face that narrowed the sky to a sliver. Across the ravine was an endless cascade of trees that engulfed the mountain range in the distance. But nobody in our group could focus for long on the breathtaking scenery. That's because to the right of the path was nothing but air, a straight drop of several hundred feet. We kept our eyes to the front and clung to the thin cable railing fastened to the rock wall.
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NEWS
June 29, 2015 | By Mike Newall, Inquirer Columnist
Tootsie Iovine-D'Ambrosio turned over a menu the other morning and sat down at her counter to sketch a family tree. A family tree of all the Iovines who work at the Reading Terminal Market. All 17 of them. "Let's see," she said, beginning with her and brother's spot: Tootsie's Salad Express. There's her brother, Tony. Shy Tony, who handles all the books, bills, and worrying. Young Tony, who's learning the ropes from dad. Her daughter Maria, who's as outgoing as her mom, and Maria's adorable little Vinnie.
NEWS
June 15, 2015 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Samuel Lemon clutched a small bouquet of white carnations as he trudged last week amid the weeds in an abandoned Delaware County cemetery, sidestepping shallow grave depressions and fallen tombstones. Somewhere under the tall grass and thistle in Chester Township lies the body of Alexander McClay Williams, an African American teen executed 84 years ago for a murder Lemon is convinced he didn't commit. The Neumann University administrator has spent more than three decades collecting evidence he hopes will exonerate Williams.
SPORTS
March 21, 2014 | BY AARON CARTER, Daily News Staff Writer cartera@phillynews.com
GET READY Hershey, the Greenbergs are coming! An official head count is still under construction, but when the Archbishop Wood Lady Vikings and the La Salle High Explorers play for their respective state titles Saturday night, the Greenberg family certainly will descend upon the Giant Center en masse. Bailey is a 5-11 sophomore forward for District 12 No. 1-seeded Wood, which plays No. 1 Blackhawk from District 7 at 6 p.m. in the Class AAA girls' championship game. Sean is a 6-3 senior wing for the No. 3 Explorers, who play District 7 top dog New Castle at 8 p.m. for the boys' AAAA crown.
TRAVEL
December 16, 2013 | By Catherine Van Brunschot, For The Inquirer
FREEPORT, Bahamas - When did choosing the winter escape for your modern family get to be such a challenging proposition? It seems there was a time when the ideal sunshine getaway was a simple triangulation of travel budget, holiday allocation, and beckoning beach. But with your family tree sprouting in new directions, training all those branches in a singular route to the sun poses a serious test to your role as head arborist. Sure, the 17-year-old is content to toast on the beach and shop for eye candy.
NEWS
August 22, 2013 | BY WENDY RUDERMAN, Daily News Staff Writer rudermw@phillynews.com, 215-854-5924
JOE TROUT dug into his backpack, pulled out a bottle of aloe hand sanitizer, squirted a glistening glob into his palm and rubbed his hands together. Then he peeled back the lid on the aluminum food container to reveal a warm slab of vegetable lasagna. He began to eat - slowly. He chewed methodically. He paused between bites. He ate so slowly that the lasagna cooled, the cheese hardened and yellowed. Trout, 22, spent most of his teen years in foster care - first in a shelter, then in a group home, later in a secure facility for violent kids.
NEWS
June 7, 2013 | By Seth Borenstein, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - New fossil evidence of the earliest complete skeleton of an ancient primate suggests it was a hyperactive, wide-eyed creature so small you could hold a couple of them in your hand - if only they would stay still long enough. The 55 million-year-old fossil dug up in central China is one of our first primate relatives and gives scientists a better understanding of the complex evolution that eventually led to us. The monkeylike creature weighed an ounce or less and wasn't a direct ancestor.
NEWS
May 13, 2013 | By David Hiltbrand, INQUIRER TV CRITIC
You have to give Christopher Guest credit: When he finds a comedy style that works for him, he sticks with it. Since This Is Spinal Tap in 1984, he has devoted himself to deadpan mockumentaries like Best in Show and Waiting for Guffman , using a loyal troupe of improv-adept actors including Michael McKean, Fred Willard, Catherine O'Hara, and John Michael Higgins. In his new eight-episode series for HBO, Family Tree , premiering at 10:30 p.m. Sunday, Guest uses his oft-imitated technique (e.g., The Office and Modern Family )
NEWS
May 10, 2013 | By Ellen Gray
* FAMILY TREE. 10:30 p.m. Sunday, HBO.   ANCESTOR worship's all the rage these days. So HBO's newest comedy, "Family Tree," about a man tracing his roots, should have built-in appeal for those not already sold by the name of co-creator Christopher Guest ("Best in Show," "Waiting for Guffman"). A writer, composer, director and actor known for improvisational comedies structured like documentaries (and for being married to Jamie Lee Curtis), Guest, who says the show was inspired by his own ventures into genealogy, boasts an ancestry that's probably more hoity-toity than that of most people scrolling Ancestry.com.
NEWS
December 21, 2012
J ay Bustard, 57, of Gilbertsville, Montgomery County, owns Bustard's Christmas Trees with brother Glenn and mother Virginia. The retail business, based in Lansdale, has been in the family since 1929. Bustard's also owns tree farms in Carbon County and in Canada, and rents a third farm in Montgomery County. Q: How have you managed to stay in business for so long? A: We've tried to offer as much value as we can. We try to cut our trees in small batches so we can keep 'em fresh.
NEWS
July 16, 2012 | Duane Perry
Duane Perry is a member of the mayor's advisory board on LGBT affairs and founder of The Food Trust   When Mitt Romney opposes same-sex marriage, he assumes he is energizing a large group of voters who want to preserve marriage by limiting it. The former governor is misguided politically and morally. Today, in six states and our nation's capital, same-sex couples get married. The legislatures and governors of two more states approved same-sex marriage this year.
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