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Family Tree

NEWS
October 30, 1994 | By Susan FitzGerald, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It used to be that tracing your family tree meant finding out where your ancestors hailed from, what year they set foot in America, and which place they first called home. Now that search for identity and roots is being done for a different reason: to see if you can control your own medical future by learning what ailed your relatives in the past. Whether you get heart disease or diabetes or cancer, whether you live a long life or die an untimely death, is dependent at least in part on the genes you inherit.
NEWS
February 2, 1994 | by Valerie M. Russ, Daily News Staff Writer
It took Isaac Maefield a while to get around to carving wood. Now 41, the North Philadelphia artist was 27 or 28 before he carved his first piece - a walking stick with a snake on it. Actually, he started learning about wood years earlier, without even realizing it. Growing up, Maefield watched as his father, also named Isaac, made benches, wagons and tables or repaired items for his family and neighbors. Maefield says his father, now deceased, worked for the city as a street- sweeper to support his family, but his profession was working with wood.
NEWS
June 13, 1993 | By Lisa E. Anderson, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
"We sailed eight English miles per hour this day. The northwest wind continued on the third (of September), changing to the North on the fourth, but became calm during the night . . . "- The journal of an immigrant from "Genealogical Record of the Schwenkfelder Families," 1734 When it comes to finding out which boat your great-great-grandparents came over on, or what battles your great-grandfather's regiment fought in, the Clifton House might...
NEWS
June 3, 1993 | By Pauline Pinard Bogaert, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
In 1986, when members of the Falcone clan went to Rome, they made a side trip to Teramo, in the Abruzzi region, on the off chance they might find family. "It was an incredible experience," said Jim Falcone 3d, then 14 years old, now a senior at the University of Miami. "All I remember was going somewhere to find relatives and then there I am having dinner with all of them. " From that trip evolved a family celebration held Saturday with nearly 100 members of the family from Pennsylvania and Italy.
NEWS
August 2, 1992 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
When Chris Anderson's daughter Christina was born four years ago, she was more to him than a newborn. She was his only flesh-and-blood relative. Or so he thought. Adopted from an Austrian orphanage at the age of 2, Anderson had been raised in the United States by a loving family, but he knew nothing of his natural parents - who they were, where they were, whether they were alive. "I always had the desire to look into my biological background," said Anderson, 30, but he never acted on that desire.
NEWS
June 15, 2015 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Samuel Lemon clutched a small bouquet of white carnations as he trudged last week amid the weeds in an abandoned Delaware County cemetery, sidestepping shallow grave depressions and fallen tombstones. Somewhere under the tall grass and thistle in Chester Township lies the body of Alexander McClay Williams, an African American teen executed 84 years ago for a murder Lemon is convinced he didn't commit. The Neumann University administrator has spent more than three decades collecting evidence he hopes will exonerate Williams.
NEWS
April 27, 1994 | Daily News wire services
LONDON HE BARKED UP WRONG FAMILY TREE An amateur historian spent 30 years tracing his family tree, only to be told he was studying the wrong one because he had been adopted, Britain's Daily Star newspaper said today. "It was 30 years work for nothing," said British restaurant owner Ian Lewis. On his quest, Lewis, 43, traveled all over Britain and talked to 2,000 relatives. He even planned to write a book about how his great-grandfather left to seek his fortune in Russia and how his grandfather was expelled after the revolution and returned to Britain.
NEWS
March 15, 1988 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / JOHN COSTELLO
A GRAND TREE TOPPLED, workers hasten to clear the trunk, limbs and branches from the 6900 block of North Broad Street in the Oak Lane section. With an eye toward recycling, the diseased London plane, 70 to 80 years old, was cut down yesterday by Family Tree, a firm under contract with the Fairmount Park Commission. Much of it will become firewood, available to the public free at the recycling center at Ford Road and Chamounix Drive.
NEWS
August 29, 1991 | By Mac Daniel, Special to The Inquirer
When Johann Peter Gerhart and his wife, Elisabeth Schmidt, produced their first child way back in the 1700s, it's unlikely they thought about the distant future - let alone the logistics of holding a 252d family reunion. But after the couple's 11 children produced their children and those kids had kids - and so on through the generations - those logistics had become staggering. This year, 2,100 invitations were sent to relatives near and far, asking them to Sunday's annual Gerhart family reunion.
NEWS
April 18, 2008
OUR PICKS in two state House races: 172nd District: Richard Costello is a retired Philadelphia cop, best known for being president of the Fraternal Order of Police. He served in that role for 10 years, representing a union constituency, running for re-election, and interacting with state representatives, senators and City Council members. Tim Kearney, a warehouse worker and former aide to the late Councilman David Cohen, is making another run for the 172nd seat, held for 30 years by John Perzel, who could be vulnerable in November now that he's no longer House speaker.
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