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Family Tree

NEWS
February 2, 1994 | by Valerie M. Russ, Daily News Staff Writer
It took Isaac Maefield a while to get around to carving wood. Now 41, the North Philadelphia artist was 27 or 28 before he carved his first piece - a walking stick with a snake on it. Actually, he started learning about wood years earlier, without even realizing it. Growing up, Maefield watched as his father, also named Isaac, made benches, wagons and tables or repaired items for his family and neighbors. Maefield says his father, now deceased, worked for the city as a street- sweeper to support his family, but his profession was working with wood.
NEWS
June 13, 1993 | By Lisa E. Anderson, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
"We sailed eight English miles per hour this day. The northwest wind continued on the third (of September), changing to the North on the fourth, but became calm during the night . . . "- The journal of an immigrant from "Genealogical Record of the Schwenkfelder Families," 1734 When it comes to finding out which boat your great-great-grandparents came over on, or what battles your great-grandfather's regiment fought in, the Clifton House might...
NEWS
June 3, 1993 | By Pauline Pinard Bogaert, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
In 1986, when members of the Falcone clan went to Rome, they made a side trip to Teramo, in the Abruzzi region, on the off chance they might find family. "It was an incredible experience," said Jim Falcone 3d, then 14 years old, now a senior at the University of Miami. "All I remember was going somewhere to find relatives and then there I am having dinner with all of them. " From that trip evolved a family celebration held Saturday with nearly 100 members of the family from Pennsylvania and Italy.
NEWS
August 2, 1992 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
When Chris Anderson's daughter Christina was born four years ago, she was more to him than a newborn. She was his only flesh-and-blood relative. Or so he thought. Adopted from an Austrian orphanage at the age of 2, Anderson had been raised in the United States by a loving family, but he knew nothing of his natural parents - who they were, where they were, whether they were alive. "I always had the desire to look into my biological background," said Anderson, 30, but he never acted on that desire.
NEWS
April 27, 1994 | Daily News wire services
LONDON HE BARKED UP WRONG FAMILY TREE An amateur historian spent 30 years tracing his family tree, only to be told he was studying the wrong one because he had been adopted, Britain's Daily Star newspaper said today. "It was 30 years work for nothing," said British restaurant owner Ian Lewis. On his quest, Lewis, 43, traveled all over Britain and talked to 2,000 relatives. He even planned to write a book about how his great-grandfather left to seek his fortune in Russia and how his grandfather was expelled after the revolution and returned to Britain.
NEWS
March 15, 1988 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / JOHN COSTELLO
A GRAND TREE TOPPLED, workers hasten to clear the trunk, limbs and branches from the 6900 block of North Broad Street in the Oak Lane section. With an eye toward recycling, the diseased London plane, 70 to 80 years old, was cut down yesterday by Family Tree, a firm under contract with the Fairmount Park Commission. Much of it will become firewood, available to the public free at the recycling center at Ford Road and Chamounix Drive.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 2010 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
See Paul (Mark Ruffalo) harvest his lush vegetable garden to provide ingredients for his luscious organic restaurant in Los Angeles. Paul's fecundity is a wonder. Where he scatters seed, there is abundance. In The Kids Are All Right , Lisa Cholodenko's sharp and seriously funny portrait of an American family, Paul is about to learn that a little deposit he made at the sperm bank 18 years ago has yielded two strapping teenagers. Paul is the bio-dad of Joni (Mia Wasikowska)
NEWS
May 19, 2011 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
WE LOST Franny two weeks ago. My sister was the middle child in our family, the fifth of nine kids, our mascot, moral compass and comedienne. I feel like I've lost a limb. Franny's death from cancer at 50 was so different from my mother's death, six months ago. Mom was 84, had endured many age-related maladies and spoke often of being ready to go to Jesus. I buried my face in her neck and cried a river when she died. But in the days afterward, I was startled by how quickly a sense of peace eased my grief.
NEWS
May 9, 2012 | Inquirer Staff Report
Clarence Still Jr., 83, of Lawnside, a community historian who was a member of one of South Jersey's best-known African American families, died Friday, May 4, after a long illness. Still, a founder of the Lawnside Historical Society, lived on an expansive property on Oak Avenue where he hosted the Still Family Reunion, an annual event that draws family members from all over the United States. The Still family tree includes abolitionists, preachers, doctors, scientists, professors, composers, Tuskegee Airmen, and professional athletes.
FOOD
November 10, 2011 | By Michael Klein
For as long as anyone could remember, Angela DiMedio Carlino wanted to put down the recipes that built Carlino's Market into a suburban institution. The holiday soup, the wedding peaches, the meatballs. "She always said, 'I'm-a-write a cook-a-book and I call it Wanna Taste? ' " said Jill Santoro, who has worked at Carlino's for 15 years, lovingly mimicking "Mama" Carlino's thick accent. Mama Carlino died Nov. 4, 2007, on her 70th birthday - two days after her family opened a second store.
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